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Fixed Sights on a handgun

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  • Smitty of the North
    replied
    Originally posted by Amigo Will View Post
    I like fixed sights. I also like good files and make the sight work for me
    I reckon that is a "Possibility".

    It's easy to file too much. I've done that and needed Andy to weld some more on, so I could file it off again. (Talking bout rifle here.)

    Smitty of the North

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  • Smitty of the North
    replied
    Originally posted by BrownBear View Post
    I'm happy with them on guns that will be fed only one load. They can be really frustrating if you're shooting lots of bullet weights and vels.

    It's pretty easy to do a little reloading to find a load that hits right on with fixed sights. But wander too far into loads with more or less recoil than standard loads the gun was sighted with, and you're not going to be happy. Snort up a 45 Colt to 454 vels, and you're not going to be a happy camper. But fixed sights on a 454 will likely be right on the money, even if standard vel 45 Colt loads hit elsewhere.

    Guys that are happy with fixed sight usually aren't the same guys who complain about short case life using their Super Dooper Internet Loads. The pressure gauge on a computer keyboard just doesn't work well enough for fixed sights.
    I would think that many, if not most of us would be using loads that are not like the FLs that the gun was supposedly sighted in for.

    When you HUNTED with handguns, did you use those that had Fixed Sights?

    SOTN

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  • Smitty of the North
    replied
    Originally posted by AZVince View Post
    Using fixed sights requires knowing your load but they do work, and well I might add, on fighting handguns.
    I prefer fixed sights on my carry revolvers and bottom feeding pistols.

    Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk
    You must have a reason for that preference.

    SOTN

    Leave a comment:


  • Smitty of the North
    replied
    Originally posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    Are you berating all fixed sights, or just the few examples you sighted? All my pistols and wheel guns have fixed sights, and I wouldn't categorize them as "close range sights at best" simply by virtue of them being fixed. I would ask what is the point of having adjustable sights on a handgun anyway; in reality, how many handgun shooters are ever going to adjust their sights for windage or elevation between shots?
    I was knockin ALL fixed/non-adjustable handgun sights. Why not? It's not like knockin Motherhood and Apple Pie. Or is it?

    Surely, we can't expect that fixed sights will be that closely sighted in for any ammunition.

    My Ruger SS has a dovetailed rear sight which I had to adjust a long time ago when I bought it.

    My Walther PPK, has a dovetailed Rear sight, and I've never felt the need to adjust it.

    My CC 38 has the groove rear sight, and I hafta use a HIGH front sight picture so it shoots even close.

    The Bearcat was unsuitable for anything but fun. The sights on the Colt SA 357 limited it's usage too.

    Surely, adjustable sights are better. I was just curious as to how other folks felt about the non-adjustable variety. (In this day and age)

    Smitty of the North

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  • AGL4now
    replied
    Perfect assessment.........

    Originally posted by rbuck351 View Post
    A lot of the older type guns had a very poor groove/notch in the top rear of the frame or even in the hammer. These sights are frequently hard to align rapidly and usually aren't square sided making them harder to align. Not sticking up from the gun makes them difficult for me to align rapidly. That being said, there are some very good fixed sights and semi fixed (slide for windage) that are excellent sights. The fixed and semi fixed are a lot more difficult to knock out of adjustment and once either filed to fit or load adjusted, rarely need anything tweeked forever.

    Leave a comment:


  • rbuck351
    replied
    A lot of the older type guns had a very poor groove/notch in the top rear of the frame or even in the hammer. These sights are frequently hard to align rapidly and usually aren't square sided making them harder to align. Not sticking up from the gun makes them difficult for me to align rapidly. That being said, there are some very good fixed sights and semi fixed (slide for windage) that are excellent sights. The fixed and semi fixed are a lot more difficult to knock out of adjustment and once either filed to fit or load adjusted, rarely need anything tweeked forever.

    Leave a comment:


  • AGL4now
    replied
    Ditto......

    Originally posted by amigo will View Post
    i like fixed sights. I also like good files and make the sight work for me

    Leave a comment:


  • Amigo Will
    replied
    I like fixed sights. I also like good files and make the sight work for me

    Leave a comment:


  • Snyd
    replied
    ...all of the above. And, you can have a couple different loads that have the same POI. I have two 45 Colt loads that hit the same POI out to 50-70yds when shot from my SBH, 355gr 1200fps (21.5gr H110) and 255gr at about 8-900 (8.5gr Unique), can't remember for sure the exact fps.

    But I have a Ruger P345 45 Auto that according to Ruger is regulated for a "standard" 230r 45 load. They are right. My 200r swc target loads shoot a few inches high. Factory Speer Gold Dot 230gr hp's are right on the money.

    Leave a comment:


  • BrownBear
    replied
    I'm happy with them on guns that will be fed only one load. They can be really frustrating if you're shooting lots of bullet weights and vels.

    It's pretty easy to do a little reloading to find a load that hits right on with fixed sights. But wander too far into loads with more or less recoil than standard loads the gun was sighted with, and you're not going to be happy. Snort up a 45 Colt to 454 vels, and you're not going to be a happy camper. But fixed sights on a 454 will likely be right on the money, even if standard vel 45 Colt loads hit elsewhere.

    Guys that are happy with fixed sight usually aren't the same guys who complain about short case life using their Super Dooper Internet Loads. The pressure gauge on a computer keyboard just doesn't work well enough for fixed sights.

    Leave a comment:


  • AZVince
    replied
    Using fixed sights requires knowing your load but they do work, and well I might add, on fighting handguns.
    I prefer fixed sights on my carry revolvers and bottom feeding pistols.

    Sent from my SGH-M919 using Tapatalk

    Leave a comment:


  • iofthetaiga
    replied
    Are you berating all fixed sights, or just the few examples you sighted? All my pistols and wheel guns have fixed sights, and I wouldn't categorize them as "close range sights at best" simply by virtue of them being fixed. I would ask what is the point of having adjustable sights on a handgun anyway; in reality, how many handgun shooters are ever going to adjust their sights for windage or elevation between shots?

    Leave a comment:


  • Smitty of the North
    started a topic Fixed Sights on a handgun

    Fixed Sights on a handgun

    Nother thread reminded me of this. Humph!

    I've not had great luck with them.

    I hadda Colt SA Army with only the groove for a sight. I figgered it was only for close range Bear Protection, so I probably would just be pointing anyway.

    I had me a Ruger Bearcat, and it wasn't much good for it's purpose of bagging small game, because I could never figger out the proper sight picture.

    Also, a Cap'n Ball 44 Colt, with only the notch on the hammer for a sight, when it was cocked, and that did purty good, ????

    They are close range sights at their best.

    What good are they, anyway? Am I missing something, (More than usual)

    Please share your thoughts on such sights. If you don't mind.

    Thanks

    Smitty of the North

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