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  • Glock trigger pull

    How do you adjust trigger pull on a glock?

    Regards

  • #2
    Send it here

    http://www.custom-glock.com/
    Normal people believe that if something ain't broke, don't fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet.

    Scott Adams

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    • #3
      Very simple. Change the connector and give it a polish job. You're looking for the 3.5# connector bar. The polish job is very easy to do with a couple Arkansas stones and some honing oil, but get someone who knows what they are doing to take care of that part for you.
      Winter is Coming...

      Go GeocacheAlaska!

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      • #4
        Originally posted by JOAT View Post
        Very simple. Change the connector and give it a polish job. You're looking for the 3.5# connector bar. The polish job is very easy to do with a couple Arkansas stones and some honing oil, but get someone who knows what they are doing to take care of that part for you.
        I dropped off a G35 at a reputable smith here in AZ with a 3.5 connector. He told me to take it back. He said he could make a 2.5 pound pull with stock parts, it turned out great. Evidently the only difference in a 3.5 connector and the stock one is some materiel is machined off. A good smith can do that to the stock one with files, stones and attention to detail.

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        • #5
          While there is probably a way to "machine" parts to specs that would give you a 2.5# pull, there is no way to take the stock 5# connector and "machine" it to be the same as the 3.5# connector. They are manufactured with a 90 bend in a piece of sheetmetal at different angles. There is nothing about one part that can be changed with any level of machining that will make the other part.

          My guess is that what he's doing is machining the trigger bar to a smaller angle of incidence to the connector. While this might be functional, it would be very difficult for anyone to even attempt without knowing the final profile. I'm sure it took a whole pile of ruined trigger bars before he figured out what radius would work. Simply changing the connector takes all the guesswork out of this because you keep the stock radius on the trigger bar.

          I think it's just a heck of a lot easier to go with the 3.5# connector and a full trigger polish job. It's like a $20 part and 15 minutes of your time with a sharpening stone set. What does the gunsmith charge for his work?
          Winter is Coming...

          Go GeocacheAlaska!

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          • #6
            I watched on American Rifleman TV as they dropped in a kit that gives a 3.5 pull and cuts the length of pull in half. It was very cool and was done in about 2 minutes total time but about $200 I think. It replaced almost all the guts so you could go back to stock at will. I like the stock setup so I did not get the info on where to get it, but if you search the American Rifleman TV website for Glock trigger pull kit I am sure it will come up. Worth looking at if nothing else.:cool::cool:
            Andy
            On the web= C-lazy-F.co
            Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
            Call/Text 602-315-2406
            Phoenix Arizona

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JOAT View Post
              I think it's just a heck of a lot easier to go with the 3.5# connector and a full trigger polish job. It's like a $20 part and 15 minutes of your time with a sharpening stone set. What does the gunsmith charge for his work?
              That 3.5 connector actually pulls about 5 pounds when measured, very inconsistent. I'm not a Glock expert just a shooter, I'm not sure about the shape of the internal pieces.

              He charged $80.00 and kept it for three days. When I got it back it was a great production class shooter. He did a few tricks along the way and I'm very happy with it.

              I too was just going to have him drop in the 3.5 connector per GlockTalks recommendations, he steered me an other way. This is a steel match gun with a 2.5 measured pull. I wouldn't do that for a personal carry bun.

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              • #8
                Sure, by doing nothing but dropping in the 3.5 you won't know exactly what your trigger pull is going to be. It ought to range between 3.5 & 5, but will vary, and can show a wide variation from pull to pull. It is the polish job that is the most important aspect of getting a clean and consistent pull.

                And you bring up a great point... what is the intended purpose of the gun? It's a big difference between a CCW and a Comp gun. If you're serious about competition, then dropping some extra $$ for the smith to do his magic would be worth it to most. If it is just a target shooter then you could do some decent work at home. If it is a CCW, then I'd highly recommend keeping a heavy trigger pull. A great combo there is the 3.5# connector with a basic deburring polish of everything, then install the Olive NY 8# trigger spring to bring it back up to a 5# pull. That combo produces a very consistent 5# pull that feels a lot better than the stock spring with the 5# connector. The trigger bar polishing is still needed as part of this combo.
                Winter is Coming...

                Go GeocacheAlaska!

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                • #9
                  JOAT,

                  No argument from me about any of your comments. I was just offering another approach. As mentioned I did buy the 3.5 connector and under a smiths advise didn't use it. The results of his work were very good.

                  As far as CCW purposes goes, leave it stock or be prepared to defend your motives if you ever have to use it for such purposes. If I recall the NYPD uses a heavier pull in their attempt to prevent the dreaded accidental discharge.

                  I would hate to be face down with a cop pointing a gun at me while shouting instructions, those guys can be intense.

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