My 1970 winchester model 70 question

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  • My 1970 winchester model 70 question

    Hi,
    I bought a used Winchester model 70 in 30-06, the serial number dates it to 1969-1970. Would this gun be able to handle heavier loads such as 180gr or 200gr?
    any help would be appreciated.

  • #2
    YES......Inspect the bore for damage (Extremely Unlikely to exist) feel the outside of the barrel for any "Bump or Bulge" (Again highly unlikely). If all good, your good to go, for any factory loads of "ANY" weight, even 220 grain if you can find them. There is always slight risk with "Handloads"......Again not likely.

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    • #3
      Thank you so much I was a little worried, I bought it yesterday for $450. At first I thought the previous owner painted the stock black, but it turned out to be a weird smooth glossy fiberglass stock which will be replaced soon. it came with a old 3X6 burris scope, which Ill keep on it for the moment because it compliments the age of the rifle. If I ever do accomplish my dream of getting a nice brown bear it will hopefully be with this rifle.

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      • #4
        You might want to have someone identify what that stock is........It "might" be a $450.00 or $600.00 stock, and if it was properly bedded, could be great. We might be able to guess, with a good photo of the stock. If your only dislike with the stock is that it is smooth, that is easy to fix.

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        • #5
          The barreled action and bolt are about the only things I like. the action is super slick, the bolt is jeweled, and when you cycle the bolt the trigger is right on the wall with no creep. As you can see from the photos, the stock is usable but ugly. The inside of the buttstock has a piece of metal in the upper right of the photo. Im sure brand new the stock was nice but it hooks like whoever fitted it didn't know which way was up. looks like they just slopped resin all over. sorry for so many post but it would only allow 2 per post. Has anyone ever seen a stock like this?

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          • #6

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            • #7

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              • #8
                That appears to actually be a nice old laid up fiberglass stock. I would clean up the inside and square away the bedding, but would keep it on the gun. It's probably as good as anything made today.
                "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by gunbugs View Post
                  That appears to actually be a nice old laid up fiberglass stock. I would clean up the inside and square away the bedding, but would keep it on the gun. It's probably as good as anything made today.
                  I think Ill just leave it as is, reason being is that they may have put al that excess to make it fit. the outside is nice other then a few chips but I can live with that.
                  i found this photo online its the same stock, I believe its a verminator made by kelbly and there $600 brand new
                  Attached Files
                  Last edited by Erik7181; 2 weeks ago.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Erik7181 View Post
                    Thank you so much I was a little worried, I bought it yesterday for $450. At first I thought the previous owner painted the stock black, but it turned out to be a weird smooth glossy fiberglass stock which will be replaced soon. it came with a old 3X6 burris scope, which Ill keep on it for the moment because it compliments the age of the rifle. If I ever do accomplish my dream of getting a nice brown bear it will hopefully be with this rifle.
                    I have guided for brown bear for most of my adult life (I'm 60 now). Most brown bear guides consider a .300 Win Mag a minimum for brown bears and would not advocate someone bringing an 0/6 for brown bear. Brown bears are extremely tough to kill. I remember skinning one and while boning out the skull I found a thirty caliber bullet resting at the back of an eye socket from a long ago wound. We can only assume it was from an under powered thirty caliber like an 0/6, 30-30 or .308. The bullet penetrated the eye until it hit bone and was stopped.

                    I would suggest a Magnum of some kind. If that's not something you want to do, a buck-up hunter with some brown bear experience and a bigger rifle would be a good idea.

                    Its a fine rifle an certainly useful for most of Alaska's big game. You wouldn't want to loose a nice bear because you came under-gunned, you certainly wouldn't want to get hurt either.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by mark knapp View Post

                      I have guided for brown bear for most of my adult life (I'm 60 now). Most brown bear guides consider a .300 Win Mag a minimum for brown bears and would not advocate someone bringing an 0/6 for brown bear. Brown bears are extremely tough to kill. I remember skinning one and while boning out the skull I found a thirty caliber bullet resting at the back of an eye socket from a long ago wound. We can only assume it was from an under powered thirty caliber like an 0/6, 30-30 or .308. The bullet penetrated the eye until it hit bone and was stopped.

                      I would suggest a Magnum of some kind. If that's not something you want to do, a buck-up hunter with some brown bear experience and a bigger rifle would be a good idea.

                      Its a fine rifle an certainly useful for most of Alaska's big game. You wouldn't want to loose a nice bear because you came under-gunned, you certainly wouldn't want to get hurt either.
                      I was scouting an area on the Western shore of Cook Inlet years ago. I had passed a particular area a couple times already looking for a way through the alders. On my 3rd pass a huge brown bear got up and trotted away. It looked like a house on 4 legs. I looked down at my Sako in .300 win mag and decided I wasn't packing enough gun to be there by myself.
                      I did kill a 9 1/2' brownie with a Winchester 71 in .348 a few years later. It took 7rounds though.
                      Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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                      • #12
                        I would respect the advice from native Alaskans more than anything. Last time I was up there we went to Katmai to do some fishing we flew in from Wasilla and we must of seen about 10 bears all over, I ran into one walking a trail in the woods scared the **** out of me but he just went about his business. But like you guys said I would not want to be in a situation where im under gunned.
                        I plan to just enjoy this rifle,
                        Attached Files

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gunbugs View Post
                          That appears to actually be a nice old laid up fiberglass stock. I would clean up the inside and square away the bedding, but would keep it on the gun. It's probably as good as anything made today.
                          Absolutely!


                          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mark knapp View Post

                            I have guided for brown bear for most of my adult life (I'm 60 now). Most brown bear guides consider a .300 Win Mag a minimum for brown bears and would not advocate someone bringing an 0/6 for brown bear. Brown bears are extremely tough to kill. I remember skinning one and while boning out the skull I found a thirty caliber bullet resting at the back of an eye socket from a long ago wound. We can only assume it was from an under powered thirty caliber like an 0/6, 30-30 or .308. The bullet penetrated the eye until it hit bone and was stopped.

                            I would suggest a Magnum of some kind. If that's not something you want to do, a buck-up hunter with some brown bear experience and a bigger rifle would be a good idea.

                            Its a fine rifle an certainly useful for most of Alaska's big game. You wouldn't want to loose a nice bear because you came under-gunned, you certainly wouldn't want to get hurt either.
                            That being said, and I mostly agree, but I do know of a few nice 9'+ brownies that were killed, dead right there, with an 06'. The key, imo, is range. Inside of 100 yards is optimal for any shot taken on a brownie, especially a large one, and, again, imo, is what a hunter, and any guide, should strive for. You want that bear to absorb as much energy as possible that the slug can deliver. Which means, the closer the better. At close range the 06' with a quality slug is certainly capable. But for the record, I'm just not an advocate of long-range shots on big bears.
                            Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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                            • #15
                              Might the stock be an older Bell & Carlson one? I have one that looks close to this one on my Model 70 338 Win Mag. I would be willing to bet that the rifle will be a good shooter, as all of my Model 70's are. Good score!

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