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FERC Accepts Preliminary Permit for Kenai Tributary Hydropower Project

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  • #16
    The purpose of a preliminary permit from FERC is to secure the site for future development for three years (max), and to study the potential for hydropower development. It does not authorize any ground-disturbing activities such as drilling or site clearing. It's just a paper exercise to determine whether hydropower could be developed, or not. The studies usually involve economics and engineering, but in this case environmental concerns would be equally important.

    If high flows from glacial run-off or lahars would be a concern, the preliminary permit stage is the place to identify those challenges. Also, if the project would effect Pacific salmon, that's a huge issue that will be a substantial concern. I'm not saying those challenges can't be overcome, but they have alot of work to do. Best of luck.

    I'm not sure what other sources of energy are available in rural KP, but a hydropower project sure beats burning 10,000 gallons of fuel oil a month to spin a turbine......

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    • #17
      Originally posted by FishGod View Post
      Cooper Lake? Ha, you mean the once vibrant tributary of the Kenai that used to support a large sockeye run and had massive rainbow trout and other salmonids, which were eliminated with the Cooper Lake/Creek project? Now, it's just a shadow of what it used to be. Great example:topjob:
      I was more pointing out that there is an existing hydro project in the Kenai watershed than saying it was good or bad.

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