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PWS Shrimping is in trouble

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  • AKBassking
    replied
    Originally posted by MRFISH View Post
    Yes on the permit. I'm glad they brought it back...I think it helped gather useful information. Some may fear that it just gathers information that can be used against you in allocation fights, but it can also help in allocation fights.

    And, the 5 pot limit isn't a change...that's the way it has been.
    OK.

    Issue: A friend of mine was shrimping around Homer years back. He reported his spot to fish and feathers. 2 weeks later there were boats and pots all over. Last time he was truthful about it.

    Leave a comment:


  • MRFISH
    replied
    Originally posted by AKBassking View Post
    So now you have to have a permit again and I can only have 5 pots?
    Yes on the permit. I'm glad they brought it back...I think it helped gather useful information. Some may fear that it just gathers information that can be used against you in allocation fights, but it can also help in allocation fights.

    And, the 5 pot limit isn't a change...that's the way it has been.

    Leave a comment:


  • AKBassking
    replied
    So now you have to have a permit again and I can only have 5 pots?

    Leave a comment:


  • aktally
    replied
    If you look at the attached link under RC118 you will get a general idea of what was passed, including a general map of the three areas open to commercial fishing under a rotational basis.

    http://www.boards.adfg.state.ak.us/f...-proposals.pdf


    Basic highlights of the plan:
    Minimum threshold required to open a commercial fishery is a total allowable harvest (TAH) of 110,000 lbs. This year the TAH is estimated to be 96,500 lbs. so the commercial fishery will not open in 2009.

    Of the TAH, 60% is allocated to the noncommercal fishery and 40% to the commercial fishery. This year the TAH for the noncommercial fishery is 57,900 lbs (60% of 96,500 lbs).

    A permit/harvest reporting form is now required for the noncommercial fishery.

    Season for both fisheries remains the same, April 15 - September 15.
    Pot limits for noncommercial remains at 5 per person/5 per vessel, although the department may liberalize or restrict pot limits/seasons/area in order to stay within the guideline harvest range.

    Commercial fishery will be rotated on an annual basis between three areas.

    There are some areas which are popular noncommercial areas that are closed to commercial fishing. Example: Passage Canal, Pigot Bay, Cochrane Bay, Culross Passage, some of Port Nellie Juan, down around Latouche Island and Port Ashton, Valdez Arm, Tatitlek, and Columbia Bay.

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  • akfishnut
    replied
    Any Further Word From The BOF

    It's my understanding the commercial shrimp season proposal passed.
    Any ideas on what the final outcome was as far a proposed regulations?

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  • willphish4food
    replied
    its official

    We do have a commercial season again in the sound. Steps were made to make it compatible with all user groups. We'll just have to see how it plays out.

    Leave a comment:


  • twodux
    replied
    personally

    Personally, I love the eggs. They're kinda crunchy and taste great!

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  • Brian M
    replied
    Dave - I understand that, but I'm pointing out that if you catch females in the spring, it's no different than killing them in the fall when they're carrying eggs. They look different, but the end result is same - taking a breeding female out of the population. A dead female in the spring is no different than a dead female in the fall. If there was cause for concern with regards to the population, I would argue that shrimping when the eggs are there would be better. In that case we could release those with eggs, thus protecting the females that we would otherwise kill in the spring when they have no eggs.

    Think of it in terms of cow moose hunts. Is a dead cow moose in September when they're not pregnant any different than a dead cow moose in March when she is pregnant? The end result is the same - one less breeding female.

    Leave a comment:


  • bushboy
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian M View Post
    Dave - In that case, it seems like it would make more sense to shrimp in the fall and mandate the release of all females like we do with crabs. Instead of killing them early in the year, we could be sure we were releasing the breeding females.

    Brian,

    I'm sorry if you got the wrong idea from my post - I'm advocating shrimping earlier in the season (Spring) to avoid catching the eggers (in the Fall) to advance the population of shrimp in PWS for us personall use fishers.

    dave

    Leave a comment:


  • AKBassking
    replied
    Update?

    Any update with the BOF?

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian M
    replied
    Dave - In that case, it seems like it would make more sense to shrimp in the fall and mandate the release of all females like we do with crabs. Instead of killing them early in the year, we could be sure we were releasing the breeding females.

    Leave a comment:


  • bushboy
    replied
    Originally posted by Brian M View Post
    How is catching a female without eggs in the summer different than catching a female with eggs in the fall? That female caught in the summer would be an egger in a few months, so the effect is the same - you're still killing an egg producing shrimp. It may look different when they're full of eggs, but there is no biological difference to the health of the resource when that female is caught.
    I don't know the answer to that question Brian. But how about this;

    When I catch a shrimp without eggs during the summer, I really don't know if that shrimp is going to produce eggs that fall so I keep her unknown to me if she will produce eggs in the fall.
    When I catch a shrimp in the fall and she is full of eggs, I now know she is producing eggs and I let her go when she's still alive and there's a chance that those eggs will survive to populate the species. I realize that earlier in the season no one would know but what about later in the season when the evidence is obvious if the egg laden females are still alive??

    Dave

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian M
    replied
    How is catching a female without eggs in the summer different than catching a female with eggs in the fall? That female caught in the summer would be an egger in a few months, so the effect is the same - you're still killing an egg producing shrimp. It may look different when they're full of eggs, but there is no biological difference to the health of the resource when that female is caught.

    Leave a comment:


  • bushboy
    replied
    Originally posted by potbuilder View Post
    DON'T EVER SAY FEE !!! the old permit system was fine, just a simple few questions to get a idea of what is being caught. Another thing i'd like to see is the season opened a bit earlier and closed bit bit sooner, why you ask?? well did you ever notice how many more eggers you catch later in the season? let them spawn out so this nice fishery we have keeps going.
    Have to agree 100% with closing the season earlier due to the amount of eggers brought up later in the season. If they show signs of life I throw throw them back but still feel bad about catching a female with eggs. As far as opening the season earlier as a tradeoff - great idea!! Would make the winter downtime a little shorter. Who doesn't want to be out in PWS ASAP ?

    Leave a comment:


  • akjeff
    replied
    Originally posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    Writing a law that is not enforceable is a waste of time even in the troopers minds.
    That's what the Government is really good at.

    Leave a comment:

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