Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why not halibut catch and release?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Why not halibut catch and release?

    It seems as if the halibut charter boat fleet could solve virtually all their allocation problems by adopting the simple concept of catch and release fishing. I think they have deluded themselves, their clients, and the public to believe that they canít run a fishing business without killing millions of pounds of fish. I don't believe that.

    There are thriving sport fisheries all over the world that function under catch and release fishing. It doesnít matter if itís by business practice or by law, but the angling public easily embraces the concept. Go chase sailfish in Costa Rica, marlin in Mexico, salmon in Russia, bonefish in the Bahamas, or trout in Bristol Bay , and youíll see the effects of catch and release fishing at work: the lodges are full, the guides work every day of the season, and the support service businesses thrive. These fisheries are only a handful of examples Ė there are many more.

    So why donít Alaska charter boat operators get with the program? Why canít they see that they can have their cake and eat it too? Yes, there very likely will be a couple of transition years where client-anglers have to become re-educated that they arenít going to go home with hundreds of pounds of packaged fish product at the end of their trip, but predicting doom for the industry if charter boat anglers can't take their x million pounds of fish each year doesnít hold up in light of all the other sport fisheries that stand in stark contrast.

  • #2
    Dude i like to EAT halibut! I like to release in grease!

    Comment


    • #3
      Hundreds of pounds of packaged fish? Right.....no one I know ever gets close to that.

      If I want to catch and release, I'm going to the Gulf, of Mexico that is, where the fish fight hard and it's 80ļ in November. Halibut are about the boringest fish I can possibly think of to catch and release, except for maybe walleyes. You can't be serious.

      Comment


      • #4
        I dunno maybe with airlines charging for every bag on the plane you can convince more people to release the big mama fish and keep chickens.
        If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction.
        Dietrich Bonhoeffer

        Comment


        • #5
          Insane

          Are you insane?
          Marc Theiler

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by moose-head View Post
            I dunno maybe with airlines charging for every bag on the plane you can convince more people to release the big mama fish and keep chickens.
            Well, if I can pay 1000 for a ticket, 500 for a rental car, 1000 for charters, and another 2 grand in food and hotels, I don't think a 50$ charge for a box of fish is going to deter me much....

            Catch and release halibut fishery is a fantasy. I told my friend this idea last night and he laughed right through the phone. It would be the kiss of death for the charter industry in Alaska. Take it from 2 typical outsiders who have spent a lot of $$ the last few years in Alaska. It wouldn't stop me from coming to Alaska, but it would stop me from fishing halibut.

            Comment


            • #7
              For what it's worth I am happy to say the biggest halibut I ever caught (150-175 mebby 2) is still swimming and I took home a limit that day.
              If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction.
              Dietrich Bonhoeffer

              Comment


              • #8
                if halibut fishing is sport fishing than catch and release makes sense.
                I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
                  if halibut fishing is sport fishing than catch and release makes sense.

                  GREAT point!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    It is sport fishing with the reward of some of the best eating that can be had at any price. If i really wanted a fight i would fish salmon sharks. Why dont I? They make poor table fare!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
                      if halibut fishing is sport fishing than catch and release makes sense.
                      So who put that inappropriate title to it?

                      Why do personal use fishermen have to have a sport fishing license in possession?

                      What's next? Catch and release moose hunting?

                      Has the entire world gone mad, or is it still just the liberals?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Mark, I don't see you complaining when the state restricts non resident hunters or hunting guides being restricted, how come you are so againsts non resident fishermen facing similar restrictions (98% of southeast charter anglers are non res)?

                        So lets review, the limit is now 1 fish for chartered anglers in SE unless the charter operator buys IFQ in which case they can allow anglers to catch 2 fish, so its a compromise of the solutions offered.

                        Lastly why the heck should we give away our halibut to non resident anglers? Because all this restriction is doing is limiting non residents.

                        And Mark, sport fishing and sport hunting are vastly different, sport hunting is about killing, sport fishing is not, at least for most
                        I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
                          Mark, I don't see you complaining when the state restricts non resident hunters......
                          That's because you're not paying attention.

                          This forum is literally full of my complaints regarding the guide requirement on non-resident hunters hunting brown bear in GMUs where predators are intensively managed.

                          In fact, the forum archives are full of my complaints of the above. I've been complaining about the above since before predator management became a buzz word.

                          ....how come you are so againsts non resident fishermen facing similar restrictions (98% of southeast charter anglers are non res)?
                          Because:

                          1) Sport fishermen are a wide representation of the "public" (and I don't have a hard-on for screwing non-residents)

                          2) Commercial fishing industry literally harvests tons and tons of the resource, to the tune of 80% - 90% of the total harvest

                          3) The same is not true of guided hunters

                          .....Lastly why the heck should we give away our halibut to non resident anglers?....
                          Because:

                          1) They paid more money for a fishing license to catch them?

                          2) And they're paying us more than people in Japan who are buying fish meat from the commercial industry?

                          .....And Mark, sport fishing and sport hunting are vastly different....
                          So why are you making a comparison above?

                          ....sport hunting is about killing, sport fishing is not, at least for most
                          So, if my intent is to catch burbot for table fare, I'm not sport fishing, right?

                          So why am I buying a sport fishing license to do so?

                          Are you trying to re-define sport fishing so that all fishermen must catch-and-release?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            In most places in this state you do not need a sport fishing license to fish for subsistence, you do need the proper subsistence permit. So in subsistence areas if you are following subsistence regulations in most cases you don't need a sport fishing license. In fact any Alaskan resident is welcome to set a halibut skate in most of SEAK and guess what, those folks (Alaskans) get management priority.

                            Sport fishing is fishing for sport and food is sometimes a bonus, but it is not primarily for food, that would be subsistence (which again the management priority for the feds).

                            The fact of the matter is that charter fishing is commercial fishing in every sense of the word, whats wrong with treating all commercial fishermen the same?
                            I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by ak_powder_monkey View Post
                              In most places in this state you do not need a sport fishing license to fish for subsistence, you do need the proper subsistence permit......
                              In many areas of this state no subsistence fishing is allowed at all.

                              .....So in subsistence areas if you are following subsistence regulations in most cases you don't need a sport fishing license. In fact any Alaskan resident is welcome to set a halibut skate in most of SEAK and guess what, those folks (Alaskans) get management priority....
                              But I can't do so with burbot, which I much prefer to eat over halibut, and nor can I do that in Cook Inlet.

                              ....Sport fishing is fishing for sport and food is sometimes a bonus, but it is not primarily for food, that would be subsistence (which again the management priority for the feds).....
                              So, people who are fishing for halibut for sport enjoy the food as a bonus, and that's good because playing a halibut on rod and reel isn't nearly as exciting as playing billfish or many other species in areas of the globe that absolutely love Americans to bring their money.

                              .....The fact of the matter is that charter fishing is commercial fishing in every sense of the word, whats wrong with treating all commercial fishermen the same?
                              Because charter fishing is not commercial fishing in any sense of the word:

                              1) Those fishing on charter boats in any area of the world and for any species buy sport fishing licenses, not commercial fishing licenses

                              2) Commercial fishing licensees catch fish by the ton, and do not have daily limits to slow them down

                              Only in Alaska (or California) are there so many people so desperate to redefine words to fit their agendas.

                              It's amazing.

                              Comment

                              Footer Adsense

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X