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Halibut, Sablefish, and King Bycatch

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  • Daveinthebush
    replied
    Originally posted by fishNphysician View Post
    I'm no commercial halibut fisherman, but can anyone here explain the mechanism for such wildly disproprtionate exploitation based on sex? How is that even possible? Is it just a size-selective phenomenon where the biggest halibut are statistically female?

    Anyone?
    I know that with whitetail deer that the fawns born, if two, you and get two bucks, two does or a buck and a doe. In years of high mortality does quite often produce two female fawns.

    That said, has anyone ever determined the percentage of males/females born in a 4 million egg hatch? Even if you took 1K of the eggs laid and die a test as to the percentage. Maybe, and just a guess, more females are born than males. Just a thought here.

    Leave a comment:


  • iceblue
    replied
    Bingo Johnnycake. But that would be to simple and would force everyone to be accountable. Way easier to continue with business as usual. Pretty sad state of affairs

    Leave a comment:


  • johnnycake
    replied
    Originally posted by gbflyer View Post
    Ok we can all agree itís extremely harmful. But how do we solve it? By nature the trawl fishery is a giant vacuum cleaner and canít sort the pollock from everything else as I understand it. So do we stop the fishery? Make them use pots? Force them to bring the bycatch to market and crush the other fisheriesí markets? Start farming Filet Oí Fish sammiches?

    I ask as I truly donít know.
    Look into the "penalty box" style regulations coupled with 100% observation that were implemented by various Canadian fisheries and drastically reduced their bycatch overnight.

    Leave a comment:


  • twodux
    replied
    As for salmon, most of them are taken with mid-water gear during the pollock season. The hard on the bottom cod and sole and rockfish seasons are the ones responsible for the halibut and crab by-catch.

    The good news is, the gulf cod season is shut down this year because of low cod numbers. Hopefully that will help the halibut and crab out.

    Leave a comment:


  • twodux
    replied
    For the difference in price, it's not worth the extra bait and fuel and time to hi=grade, even if it was legal which it is not. I had a friend who made a 33 inch mark on his boat to make sure his crew didn't accidentally keep undersized fish. He got a ticket for high grading. As for the percentages, there has always been a much higher % of females than males in the longline catch. Don't know about other fisheries. Maybe it has something to do with the 32 inch rule. Maybe a lot of the smaller fish are males. But I'd say over the years I longlined, 75% or more of the fish I cleaned were females. Personally, I'd like to see an upper limit on the size of halibut that are retained. sport and commercial. Say 100 lbs. The same thing they do with Sturgeon now.

    Leave a comment:


  • gbflyer
    replied
    Originally posted by extrema View Post
    Wow! I seem to recall reading at some point that bigger halibut bring a higher price per pound. Is the catch being high-graded at sea by releasing the smaller fish (males) in favour of the larger and higher priced females?
    Where I live and fish in 2c, there is a lot of pressure put on the 38Ē and under fish due to charter fishing regulations. Those are males for the most part. Its well documented as we have a creel survey guy from ADFG at the dock every day. Itís good business for the long liners, fewer dinks to shake. But when looking at the overall picture, what happens here is a drop in the bucket.

    Yes, comm fishermen get more money for over 60ís. The yield is higher. I suppose high grading varies from boat to boat.

    All of that pales in comparison to the trawl by - catch though. Thatís where the real consumption occurs.

    Leave a comment:


  • extrema
    replied
    Wow! I seem to recall reading at some point that bigger halibut bring a higher price per pound. Is the catch being high-graded at sea by releasing the smaller fish (males) in favour of the larger and higher priced females?

    Leave a comment:


  • fishNphysician
    replied
    I'm no commercial halibut fisherman, but can anyone here explain the mechanism for such wildly disproprtionate exploitation based on sex? How is that even possible? Is it just a size-selective phenomenon where the biggest halibut are statistically female?

    Anyone?

    Leave a comment:


  • fishNphysician
    replied
    Originally posted by patsfan54 View Post
    we might not have to worry long about halibut bycatch, if all the females keep getting caught at the rate they are being caught...

    "coastwide, catches are coming in at 82 percent female on average by total number of fish."

    "
    in some areas, itís higher. Area 4, which covers the bering sea and aleutian islands, the catch was 92 percent female. Areas c, d and e, the central bering sea, were 97 percent female."

    https://www.alaskajournal.com/2019-1...ed-annual-data

    holy moses!

    Leave a comment:


  • Patsfan54
    replied
    We might not have to worry long about halibut bycatch, if all the females keep getting caught at the rate they are being caught...

    "Coastwide, catches are coming in at 82 percent female on average by total number of fish."

    "
    In some areas, itís higher. Area 4, which covers the Bering Sea and Aleutian Islands, the catch was 92 percent female. Areas C, D and E, the Central Bering Sea, were 97 percent female."

    https://www.alaskajournal.com/2019-1...ed-annual-data

    Leave a comment:


  • Rob B
    replied
    Here is the latest in Bycatch numbers.

    https://www.kbbi.org/post/week-bycatch-november-6

    Leave a comment:


  • Patsfan54
    replied
    Originally posted by cdubbin View Post
    One halfway decent season in one river system because of unusually heavy rains during one winter does not mean salmon are recovering on the west coast....
    I'm not sure who is saying that kings are recovering on the west coast, it certainly wasn't me. I also wasn't aware that king salmon were a single year species capable of hatching out, going out to sea and then returning from sea to spawn all during one year. I always thought kings took years to go through their entire life cycle. Thanks for correcting my misunderstanding.

    Leave a comment:


  • cdubbin
    replied
    Originally posted by Patsfan54 View Post
    King salmon are returning in greater and greater numbers in California, as state well known for having much warmer temperatures than Alaska. If global warming is hurting kings in the Kenai is it also helping them in California?
    One halfway decent season in one river system because of unusually heavy rains during one winter does not mean salmon are recovering on the west coast....

    Leave a comment:


  • Patsfan54
    replied
    Originally posted by kidfromgarcia View Post
    A common theme in articles about climate change is some species will thrive, some will hang-on at very low levels, and some will go away. In my opinion Kings are a loser in climate change warm and changing ocean and fresh waters are dooming kings. so all the fishing regulations people want to change will not make a difference to the changing environment. There is already studies showing several areas in Cook Inlet will be too warm in 25 years to support salmon. Go ahead make the Kenai drift only, catch and release only and close the set netters and trawlers forever. Not gonna change the air and water temperatures from getting warmer. The environment is not able to make them big fish and large numbers any more. A bigger government is not going to solve the problem.
    King salmon are returning in greater and greater numbers in California, as state well known for having much warmer temperatures than Alaska. If global warming is hurting kings in the Kenai is it also helping them in California?

    Leave a comment:


  • kidfromgarcia
    replied
    Originally posted by Cohoangler View Post
    Actually, it might be fairly simple.

    Other fishing sectors have solved their by-catch issue by improving their gear and getting better time/location information for deployment. Shrimp fisheries are a great example.

    If NMFS would greatly restrict the Pollock by-catch (as an example), it might force the user groups to re-invent their gear to only catch the target species. A restrictive limit on by-catch should be a limit where fishing is uneconomical with the current gear. This would require users to develop better gear, and to deploy that gear at times and locations where by-catch is close to zero. If not, they can’t go fishing. So they can either adapt or die.

    It’s worked before. It can again, but only if NMFS is willing and able (politically) to do it.
    A common theme in articles about climate change is some species will thrive, some will hang-on at very low levels, and some will go away. In my opinion Kings are a loser in climate change warm and changing ocean and fresh waters are dooming kings. so all the fishing regulations people want to change will not make a difference to the changing environment. There is already studies showing several areas in Cook Inlet will be too warm in 25 years to support salmon. Go ahead make the Kenai drift only, catch and release only and close the set netters and trawlers forever. Not gonna change the air and water temperatures from getting warmer. The environment is not able to make them big fish and large numbers any more. A bigger government is not going to solve the problem.

    Leave a comment:

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