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  • Little Local Help and Advise

    About 15 years ago started flying lessons got 10 hours in and did my first solo.(152)
    Due to kids and life had to stop.
    Now up here in AK with the MT home on the market, am ready to restart and get my license.
    Questions,
    Can I use my old logged flying time toward my new schooling? Also when the house sells here shortly will be buying a Maule and am wondering since it will be a tail dragger with more HP should I try and train in one also.
    How do the ratings work? If I train in say a 150 or 152 Cessna, how much more of a rating or time will I need to spend if I get say get an M4 220.
    Will I be limited in just flying in the same horsepower class? or trike gear?
    I am here in Anchorage now but will be moving to Palmer/Wasilla area next month. Where do you guy's recommend I get my flight traning from?
    Anchorage or Palmer? Anyone to stay away from? (PM on this one)
    Will be doing this kind of quick and would like to be flying by this summer and am starting a King Course next week.
    Any advise would be greatly appreciated
    Fish IT! Hunt IT! or *#%@ IT!

  • #2
    2 cents

    If you have the time logged from years back it counts. As far as training in a 152 to a maule you need a tailwheel endorsement. So, the smart way to do it is just wait till the maule shows up and do all your flying (training) in it. You will save money and get experience in the A/C you intend to fly anyway and get the tailwheel endorsement in the process.

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    • #3
      you will also need a high performance endorsement because the m4 220 is above 200 hp. I think.

      Comment


      • #4
        I'm pretty sure you need endorsements for both high performance and tailwheel. You can credit all the hours you have toward your certificate, there's no expiration on experience.

        I would have no qualms about starting out your training in the Maule. The military has trained many thousands of pilots from scratch in airplanes with more horsepower than that.

        Good luck and welcome to Alaska!...Louis
        Louis Knapp

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        • #5
          Train in the plane your going to buy. You will earn your tailwheel and high performace endorsments and flying a taildragger is just plain fun. Note that you will need your log book from your past flights for them to count. No logbook= no hours. The best flight schools are in ANC. Have fun and fly safe and often.

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          • #6
            instructor

            Try Walt Warner. Don't have a number but he lives close to the Willow airport and has an Maule M5. Used him years ago in my M4 and was great. Had my check ride with Herb Hubbard at Merrill. Don't know if he's still flying though. Pretty old but a great pilot.

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            • #7
              I had Herb Hubbard for my CFI instruction a number of years ago and also highly recommend him. I got a message a while back from someone on this list that Herb had planned to leave the State this spring but you should look him up anyway. It's been my experience that most people who plan to leave either don't, or return to AK in short order....Louis
              Louis Knapp

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              • #8
                Grizzly 1

                Originally posted by Tigermusky View Post
                you will also need a high performance endorsement because the m4 220 is above 200 hp. I think.
                To show you how dumb I really am, I have to ask: who requires these endorsements? The flight school? Insurance carriers?

                My poor ol' Commercial Land and Sea, with Instrument Privileges, carries neither of those endorsements.

                Anyone help me out with this one?

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                • #9
                  A tailwheel endorsement is required by the FAA, as is a high performance endorsement. I don't recall the dates these rules were implemented, but it was before I got my certificate. I have both endorsements in my log book. I believe the high performance endorsement is required for a constant-speed prop as well as >200hp.

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                  • #10
                    high perf. complex, and tailwheel endorsements..

                    I got my high perf. in 84 in a 206. I think it was a fairly new requirement at the time, and I remember wishing it was a 210 so I could get my complex endorsement at the same time. (all of controllable pitch prop, movable flaps, and retractable gear). If you have a Maule with greater than 200 hp, you can get your tailwheel endorsement and high perf. basically at the same time. I have given a lot of complex endorsements in a 177RG, but it didnt count as high performance because that aircraft had 200 hp.

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                    • #11
                      Grizzly,

                      I think you are exempt from those endorsements because of prior experience in type. The feds apparently felt the need to classify by performance and complexity sometime in the early 80's. noone I know who received certificates or ratings in the 70's or earlier has them that I know of.

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                      • #12
                        Grizzly 1

                        Originally posted by cubpilot View Post
                        I think you are exempt from those endorsements because of prior experience in type. The feds apparently felt the need to classify by performance and complexity sometime in the early 80's. noone I know who received certificates or ratings in the 70's or earlier has them that I know of.

                        Thanks!

                        My tickets and ratings go back into the mid-fifties and sixties. Guess I'm just older than dirt. Still flyin', though ............................

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                        • #13
                          Thanks

                          Thanks fellows for the info.
                          I am going to go ahead and get my license in a rental. Checking into things I see that going with an older Maule with over 200 Hp I will need a tailwheel and High Performance endorsment.
                          I will most likely train at Merrill. When I get my plane will go for the 2 endorsements and then up to Talkeetna for Float and mountain stuff. I have been told to stay away from Hood as it is a zoo and up Talkeetna way is amazing flying.
                          Thanks again.
                          Fish IT! Hunt IT! or *#%@ IT!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Having been based at Lake Hood for a long time I'd argue that Merrill is a zoo with ground control and constant touch and go traffic. You might check with Arctic Flyers and train in a T-Craft at Hood. I like gravel better than pavement. Your tailwheel training would be out of the way, anyway.

                            Hood has designated airspace corridors to enter and leave but so does Merrill. Both are restricted by adjoining airspaces. If you want to leave without talking to departure control you can go to 1200' off of Hood to cross the inlet. Merrill airspace tops at 600' unless you talk to departure. I reckon most students want flight following so that's probably not a big issue either way. You can climb to 2K with a squalk code and go across with radar from either place. I'd suggest you should get some time at both. Your instructor will most likely take you in and out of both regardless of where you settle in. You should ask for a run in and out of International as well.

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                            • #15
                              Grizzly 1

                              Originally posted by Mr. Pid View Post
                              Having been based at Lake Hood for a long time I'd argue that Merrill is a zoo with ground control and constant touch and go traffic. You might check with Arctic Flyers and train in a T-Craft at Hood. I like gravel better than pavement. Your tailwheel training would be out of the way, anyway.

                              Hood has designated airspace corridors to enter and leave but so does Merrill. Both are restricted by adjoining airspaces. If you want to leave without talking to departure control you can go to 1200' off of Hood to cross the inlet. Merrill airspace tops at 600' unless you talk to departure. I reckon most students want flight following so that's probably not a big issue either way. You can climb to 2K with a squalk code and go across with radar from either place. I'd suggest you should get some time at both. Your instructor will most likely take you in and out of both regardless of where you settle in. You should ask for a run in and out of International as well.
                              Used to be that, whether Merrill, Hood or International, crossings to and from McKenzie were to be below 500' or above 2000'. This on account of Elmendorf AFB traffic. Has that changed?

                              Comment

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