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  • The best flight ever

    I had one of the best flights ever yesterday. I didn't even plan it. I went out to check on Miss T (our Taylorcraft), and decided that it was way to beautiful out not to fly. So I called home and left a message saying where I was going and for how long. I've made numerous landings on lakes with skis before, but none like this one so far. Towards the end of the flight I decided to head over to the Muklung and Iwithla area, about 10-15 minutes NE of Dillingham. As I got closer I had the urge to relieve myself. When I got there I started flying around the ridges. On one of the last shoulders I spotted a place that I thought might just be good enough to land, or at least drag my skis. So I made a pass, and then another one, and another. Getting a little bit more bold every time. I picked out a good touchdown point, and told myself "No pressure, if everything doesn't look good just go around. You don't NEED to land here." On my last final everything was stable, so I decided to commit. I held the yoke all the way back, and she plopped down an airplane length or less from my aim point. We slid to a stop, and I hopped out. Looking at Miss T was truly an amazing sight. I could see mountains and frozen rivers and blue bird skies everywhere I looked. Being out there all by myself with no one to give me lessons or advice was awesome. After producing a little yellow snow, I walked forward to determine how much real estate I had left. Clambering back into Miss T, I buckled up and firewalled the throttle. The mighty A-65 roared to life, and my 65 stallions charged forward towards the edge of the world. My tail was up in two seconds flat, and was at flying speed in no time. It was over way too fast, and entirely addicting. Slowly I turned towards home, and the fading sun. Savoring the moment all the way.
    -Out-of-State for school, remembering why I love Alaska so much

  • #2
    Looking forward

    I am still going for my private pilot's license. Your story gives me more to look forward to! It will take me a while longer to get to the wilderness, but I know it is out there.
    Thanks,
    Patrick

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    • #3
      My opinion...

      That is what flying in alaska is all about. Now i just can't wait to get my plane out of its annual. Actually its getting in that seems to take alot of time. :rolleyes:

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      • #4
        Now why did you have go and tell a flying story like that! It makes me jealous as heck! I spent thousands of hours flying in that area both personally and as an airtaxi pilot. Though some days were boring you never got tired of the "really" nice days whether its up the lakes or out on Cape Constantine. I used to get away from it all and relax at a strip located in the Muklung Hills that you talk about. Those experiences give me something to daydream about while I sit for hours in the cockpit of the Boeing that I now fly.
        Cool story, it reminds me of home!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by NERKA71 View Post
          Now why did you have go and tell a flying story like that! It makes me jealous as heck! I spent thousands of hours flying in that area both personally and as an airtaxi pilot. Though some days were boring you never got tired of the "really" nice days whether its up the lakes or out on Cape Constantine. I used to get away from it all and relax at a strip located in the Muklung Hills that you talk about. Those experiences give me something to daydream about while I sit for hours in the cockpit of the Boeing that I now fly.
          Cool story, it reminds me of home!
          Its a good place to get berries and catch grayling too. We went on a snogo ride over there sat. and got about 25 ptarmigan total, 10 of which were mine. Saw a sow with two cubs that just woke-up, and about 8 moose. Beautiful place
          -Out-of-State for school, remembering why I love Alaska so much

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          • #6
            Sweet story.
            It's funny that your's was the first post I've read on this site because I too fly a 65h.p T-craft down here in MN. The plane is my fathers and I've only have about 150 hrs. I'm going to school about four hours from where she is hangered and sometimes I get flying withdrawls and cruise pilot sites in an attempt to subside such urges. Funny thing it never helps especially after reading a story like that. Just had to comment........keep em coming.

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            • #7
              great story ward!

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              • #8
                You did better than this guy!

                Uh, control tower, I'm in a little predicament here . . .
                __________________________________________________ ________

                I've just soiled myself . . . :eek:





                Full story:

                http://www.adn.com/news/alaska...on/story/776605.html

                I think this is a Taylorcraft too . . . .

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by L. G. View Post
                  Uh, control tower, I'm in a little predicament here . . .
                  __________________________________________________ ________

                  I've just soiled myself . . . :eek:





                  Full story:

                  http://www.adn.com/news/alaska...on/story/776605.html

                  I think this is a Taylorcraft too . . . .
                  The guy who was flying that plane is a guy I've been friends with since 1st grade and a top-notch pilot.
                  Surviving one day at a time with a PhD in Physics.

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                  • #10
                    Top notch pilot? according to the article in ADN he has had his license about a year, and for 'crusty snow' those are pretty deep tracks. From the way it looks he was about 5 feet from being an ex-human. It is hard to admit that a friend screwed up, but it is about that time. Most times you go into a new place it is best to drag the landing area, that is what he should have done.
                    The winner isn't the person with the most gold when they die, but rather, the person with the most stories.

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                    • #11
                      Good point, top-notch was probably not the best word choice. I agree that he screwed up, but I would have no problem getting into a plane with him, I trust this guy more than words can convey. He's one of the most methodic people I've ever met, too.

                      and to keep with the title of the thead, last summer we went for a stroll around kachemak bay and that was the best flight of my life
                      Surviving one day at a time with a PhD in Physics.

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                      • #12
                        1st grade and a top-notch pilot.
                        He's landing,and about to go over a sheer cliff with what looks like a substantial drop off. Am I wrong in my reasoning here, but my thought would be to firewall it,and given the terrain, pitch down to get airspeed. But I read in ADN he was trying to "steer it away from the edge" On skis? More money than brains, IMO.

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                        • #13
                          It is easy to make a judgement when your not in that pilots seat. Anyone can say "I would have done this or that", but I'm sure those of us that fly enough know that we've got away with stupid s*%$ that we know we shouldn't have, or could have just as easily gone wrong. I've always been told there are two groups of pilots; those that have, and those who will.
                          -Out-of-State for school, remembering why I love Alaska so much

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by alaskadrifter View Post
                            It is easy to make a judgement when your not in that pilots seat. Anyone can say "I would have done this or that", but I'm sure those of us that fly enough know that we've got away with stupid s*%$ that we know we shouldn't have, or could have just as easily gone wrong. I've always been told there are two groups of pilots; those that have, and those who will.
                            OK I have made poor decisions in the past[mostly involving flying into IMC]
                            my issue here is like so many others,he tried to save a botched landing and made a routine go round into a near disaster. Yes I do feel I would have reacted differently.

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                            • #15
                              I think I would have done things differently too. I'm just saying hindsight is 20/20 and its often easier to see what went wrong when you are removed from the situation.
                              -Out-of-State for school, remembering why I love Alaska so much

                              Comment

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