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  • Question about which aircraft would work

    I am building a new cabin up in the Skwentna area, I am on a remote lake that is 1600ft. long. My land is at the top {looks like an island} to the right is the end of the lake which is North and is marsh. I need to get some things in and the plane will be going out without me. Any ideas planewise? Thanks

    JOHN

  • #2
    Depends on how much you need to haul in. A beaver on floats could do it. If you need to haul in more than a beaver load, the next best would be a single-engine turbine otter. Rust's Flying Service out of Lake Hood can provide either option.

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    • #3
      You might try giving Willow Air a call as well. I think they have a Beaver and a 185 on floats. They're a little closer so it may save a few bucks. You may have to wait for a day with a little wind, 1600 ft doesn't leave much wiggle room.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by tralika View Post
        You might try giving Willow Air a call as well. I think they have a Beaver and a 185 on floats. They're a little closer so it may save a few bucks. You may have to wait for a day with a little wind, 1600 ft doesn't leave much wiggle room.

        I'm not doing this until June. I talked to Willow Air and they are going to look at the lake. They are thinking only a Supercub but, I need something a little bigger.
        JOHN

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        • #5
          Call Jimmy at Trail Ridge Air, he knows the area and should be able to get a Beaver in there. Leaving empty is a plus. There number is 248-0838 and the e-mail to show them the pic of the lake is Jim@trailridgeair.com. Jims a great guy with a good reputation.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by alexander View Post
            Call Jimmy at Trail Ridge Air, he knows the area and should be able to get a Beaver in there. Leaving empty is a plus. There number is 248-0838 and the e-mail to show them the pic of the lake is Jim@trailridgeair.com. Jims a great guy with a good reputation.

            Thanks, will call them.
            JOHN

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            • #7
              Originally posted by alaska4ever View Post
              I am building a new cabin up in the Skwentna area, I am on a remote lake that is 1600ft. long. My land is at the top {looks like an island} to the right is the end of the lake which is North and is marsh. I need to get some things in and the plane will be going out without me. Any ideas planewise? Thanks

              If the airplane isn't severely overloaded, a C-182 o9n floats should do it. So will a C-206. With heavier loads, and the open ground around the water, either plane could do it, but it might depend upon who's driving . . . . .

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Grizzly 1 View Post
                If the airplane isn't severely overloaded, a C-182 o9n floats should do it. So will a C-206. With heavier loads, and the open ground around the water, either plane could do it, but it might depend upon who's driving . . . . .
                Just me, possibly 2 people and taking in maybe 200lbs of frieght, or less.
                JOHN

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                • #9
                  A Cessna 206 would do it, especially coming out empty. I would suggest any of the long-time pilots at Rust's. They're all high time and know the limits of the planes they fly. I don't know of any C-182s on floats in commercial service in your neck of the woods.

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                  • #10
                    With 200# the 206 is the way to go. If you were hauling a much larger load I say either barge or fly it up in a larger plane and then have someone with a helicopter sling it to your sight from the barge or airport.

                    Just my nickel
                    Drew
                    Normal people believe that if something ain't broke, don't fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet.

                    Scott Adams

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Toddler View Post
                      With 200# the 206 is the way to go. If you were hauling a much larger load I say either barge or fly it up in a larger plane and then have someone with a helicopter sling it to your sight from the barge or airport.

                      Just my nickel
                      Drew


                      That is just to costly, I think I got enough info to help me. Thanks to everyone that responded.
                      JOHN

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                      • #12
                        A reasonably skilled pilot could easily get in with a 206 at full gross weight. It's getting out empty that's the critical factor.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Monguse View Post
                          A Cessna 206 would do it, especially coming out empty. I would suggest any of the long-time pilots at Rust's. They're all high time and know the limits of the planes they fly. I don't know of any C-182s on floats in commercial service in your neck of the woods.

                          Oops! Should have read my response. I MEANT to say: C-185, not C-182. My apologies to all . . . . .

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                          • #14
                            Put that length into context. If I take off from the buoy line in front of the Millennium Hotel it's approx 2000' to the east tip of Gull Island. Go watch the float planes leave on the west route and try to determine what's in the plane and where they get out of the water. If the operator is on the fence about the lake now you can expect their attitude to get worse as the weather gets warmer. An airplane's performance is better in 60* than 80*. The Skwentna area can get warm in the summer.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Mr. Pid View Post
                              Put that length into context. If I take off from the buoy line in front of the Millennium Hotel it's approx 2000' to the east tip of Gull Island. Go watch the float planes leave on the west route and try to determine what's in the plane and where they get out of the water. If the operator is on the fence about the lake now you can expect their attitude to get worse as the weather gets warmer. An airplane's performance is better in 60* than 80*. The Skwentna area can get warm in the summer.

                              I talked to Willow Air and they are going to look at the lake. IfI can't get on my lake, there is another lake 1500ft. from me and that lake is about 3000ft. The only problem is between the two lakes there is a creek about 10 to 30 ft. across. I'll figure it out.
                              JOHN

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