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  • #16
    Originally posted by cdubbin View Post
    And don't forget a AAA "Plus" membership, and a current copy of the Milepost....your best friends on the road....

    Great, tanks, didnt know about the Milepost

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    • #17
      Originally posted by AGL4now View Post
      Actually they are lots.


      tracts (plural noun)
      • an area of indefinite extent, typically a large one.
        "large tracts of natural forest"

      ah okay, thanks. If there was a road to sunrise, wed definitely take a look there also.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by flopitdown View Post
        ah okay, thanks. If there was a road to sunrise, wed definitely take a look there also.
        There is a road. Sunrise is basically Hope - a few miles before you get to Hope, but basically the same area. The guy who responded is selling some land in Sunrise. Nice area, missing some of what youre looking for. Of course, no place has everything youre looking for. Ill put together a reply tomorrow. Alaska is pretty amazing, but a few of the things youd like to find are unrealistic.

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        • #19
          We have wolverines on the Kenai Peninsula. Also herds of caribou. Lots of wolves, but you won't see them in town. More likely to see coyotes. We have lots of bears, both brown and black. Moose will be in your yard. We have an abundance of salmon.
          Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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          • #20
            Also I might be selling a furnished cabin about 35 miles north of Kenai about the time you come up.
            Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

            Comment


            • #21
              A few responses to specific questions:

              1 - Wolverine sightings are rare and unpredictable at best. I spend more time outdoors than most (though not as much as some on here), and I've seen two in 40 years of living here. Don't base where you want to live on the hopes of a wolverine sighting. They're amazing critters, but even in the highest density areas, seeing one can't be counted on. At all. Especially near one's home. If you want to see a wolverine, spend a lot of time in the mountains.

              2 - There are no towns on the road system where caribou migrate right through town with the possible exception of Paxson - though, it's a stretch to call Paxson a town. There are caribou in the mountains east of Healy, but there aren't caribou that pass through Healy itself, and the caribou in those mountains to the east don't herd up and migrate in a manner similar to what you might see in a nature documentary. You will never see caribou in Healy itself - much like wolverine, in that area you'll need to cover some ground and climb some mountains to see caribou.

              3 - Bison live in very few, very small areas. On the road system, the only bison are in the Delta Junction area. There are also small bison herds east of McCarthy, along the Iditarod trail between Rohn and Nikolai (commonly referred to as the Farewell area), on the east bank of the Copper River, and now there is a new herd along the Innoko River. The short version is that the only place you'd see bison is if you lived in Delta Junction or the immediate surrounding areas.

              4 - Wolves are where they are. Their populations fluctuate pretty wildly. In general, if you want to live where you might see a wolf, go as remote as possible. There are exceptions, though. I live in Eagle River, and about five years ago there were regular wolf sightings on the edge of town. In the past few years, though? Zero that I'm aware of. As with wolverines, if you want to see wolves, spent a lot of time in wild places away from any town. A LOT.

              5 - Zero caribou in Valdez or Girdwood. It's not due to the snow - there just aren't any herds in those areas. Zero.

              6 - Yes, a simple cabin 25-40 minutes out of town is realistic in many places in Alaska, especially Fairbanks. Fairbanks/North Pole is the king of dry cabins, but such a situation can be found outside many towns. Just get rid of the idea of seeing caribou, wolves, and wolverine traipsing through your lot.

              8 - I haven't lived in Healy, so take my perspective for what it's worth. In Healy you'd have good access to much of what you're looking for, but none of it right by your house. You would see moose in town, and that's about it. For caribou and the rest you'd be traveling into the park like the rest of the tourists, and in my perspective that kind of defeats the purpose. The first places that came to my mind in reading your post are Cantwell, Delta Junction, and Tok. None of those fit the bill perfectly either, but each offers a bit more that Healy based on your list.

              Ultimately, you need to understand that two of the three things you listed as priorities at the end simply won't be passing through your yard - wolves and caribou. For those, you'll need to spend serious time traveling, watching, and listening. You could choose to live truly remote and have caribou pass by a couple times per year, but it sounds like you also want access to groceries (and I don't blame you for that!). Again, Alaska is pretty dang awesome, but even for those of us who live here and know the land well, sightings of wolves and wolverine are very rare and caribou herds are largely far from the road or in places where grocery stores don't exist. You can see all of it, but not in your yard.


              Good luck with the search!

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              • #22
                Originally posted by SmokeRoss View Post
                We have wolverines on the Kenai Peninsula. Also herds of caribou. Lots of wolves, but you won't see them in town. More likely to see coyotes. We have lots of bears, both brown and black. Moose will be in your yard. We have an abundance of salmon.

                Interesting to know this, thanks.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by SmokeRoss View Post
                  Also I might be selling a furnished cabin about 35 miles north of Kenai about the time you come up.

                  I will definitely get in touch before we leave.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by Brian M View Post
                    A few responses to specific questions:

                    1 - Wolverine sightings are rare and unpredictable at best. I spend more time outdoors than most (though not as much as some on here), and I've seen two in 40 years of living here. Don't base where you want to live on the hopes of a wolverine sighting. They're amazing critters, but even in the highest density areas, seeing one can't be counted on. At all. Especially near one's home. If you want to see a wolverine, spend a lot of time in the mountains.

                    2 - There are no towns on the road system where caribou migrate right through town with the possible exception of Paxson - though, it's a stretch to call Paxson a town. There are caribou in the mountains east of Healy, but there aren't caribou that pass through Healy itself, and the caribou in those mountains to the east don't herd up and migrate in a manner similar to what you might see in a nature documentary. You will never see caribou in Healy itself - much like wolverine, in that area you'll need to cover some ground and climb some mountains to see caribou.

                    3 - Bison live in very few, very small areas. On the road system, the only bison are in the Delta Junction area. There are also small bison herds east of McCarthy, along the Iditarod trail between Rohn and Nikolai (commonly referred to as the Farewell area), on the east bank of the Copper River, and now there is a new herd along the Innoko River. The short version is that the only place you'd see bison is if you lived in Delta Junction or the immediate surrounding areas.

                    4 - Wolves are where they are. Their populations fluctuate pretty wildly. In general, if you want to live where you might see a wolf, go as remote as possible. There are exceptions, though. I live in Eagle River, and about five years ago there were regular wolf sightings on the edge of town. In the past few years, though? Zero that I'm aware of. As with wolverines, if you want to see wolves, spent a lot of time in wild places away from any town. A LOT.

                    5 - Zero caribou in Valdez or Girdwood. It's not due to the snow - there just aren't any herds in those areas. Zero.

                    6 - Yes, a simple cabin 25-40 minutes out of town is realistic in many places in Alaska, especially Fairbanks. Fairbanks/North Pole is the king of dry cabins, but such a situation can be found outside many towns. Just get rid of the idea of seeing caribou, wolves, and wolverine traipsing through your lot.

                    8 - I haven't lived in Healy, so take my perspective for what it's worth. In Healy you'd have good access to much of what you're looking for, but none of it right by your house. You would see moose in town, and that's about it. For caribou and the rest you'd be traveling into the park like the rest of the tourists, and in my perspective that kind of defeats the purpose. The first places that came to my mind in reading your post are Cantwell, Delta Junction, and Tok. None of those fit the bill perfectly either, but each offers a bit more that Healy based on your list.

                    Ultimately, you need to understand that two of the three things you listed as priorities at the end simply won't be passing through your yard - wolves and caribou. For those, you'll need to spend serious time traveling, watching, and listening. You could choose to live truly remote and have caribou pass by a couple times per year, but it sounds like you also want access to groceries (and I don't blame you for that!). Again, Alaska is pretty dang awesome, but even for those of us who live here and know the land well, sightings of wolves and wolverine are very rare and caribou herds are largely far from the road or in places where grocery stores don't exist. You can see all of it, but not in your yard.


                    Good luck with the search!

                    Hey Brian, I really appreciate this long explanation. I will definitely look into those places you mentioned. We never really expected to see wolverines or wolves on our property, but I was just curious what people here would say. You mentioned a lot of things though that are great, thanks. By thew way, we do not plan on moving to a place like Circle but we were curious, if we settled down in Circle, would people in these small places accept outsiders moving in, or would they just ignore you and give you the feeling of not being welcome?
                    Also, are any of the places on our list a dangerous place to be in terms of crime?

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Kenai lowland Caribou frequently stop traffic in the Kenai, Soldotna, Sterling area. It's often a big surprise to drive around a corner on the highway in the KW and discover stopped motor homes in both lanes and tourists standing in the road with the cameras out. For caribou or moose. At least pull off the road.
                      Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by SmokeRoss View Post
                        Kenai lowland Caribou frequently stop traffic in the Kenai, Soldotna, Sterling area. It's often a big surprise to drive around a corner on the highway in the KW and discover stopped motor homes in both lanes and tourists standing in the road with the cameras out. For caribou or moose. At least pull off the road.

                        I can imagine that can be frustrating with all the tourists. We dont plan on annoying the locals

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          The best place to live and watch wildlife from your cabin window, is to have the cabin on the shore of a very-very large lake. When I lived on the shore of "majestic" Lake Clark you could always watch wildlife.
                          Especially in the winter when the lake was frozen and had fresh snow. Having 3 to 5 miles across and 52 miles long expanse with no brush, trees or grass, any movement as quickly observed.

                          Another tip for watching wildlife is raising domestic animals in Alaska. Several years ago I large flocks of turkeys and geese, they were great for attracting wolves and bears.

                          Another way to attract wildlife to your yard for observation and study is to set-up a predator call where you can watch from your window, and activate it a half hour before first daylight.
                          "Life Is Either a Daring Adventure or Nothing" - Helen Keller

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            A wolverine got a few pet rabbits last week on the Anchorage hillside.
                            When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
                            '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"
                            2018 12' Moto Jet "River Pup"

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by AGL4now View Post
                              The best place to live and watch wildlife from your cabin window, is to have the cabin on the shore of a very-very large lake. When I lived on the shore of "majestic" Lake Clark you could always watch wildlife.
                              Especially in the winter when the lake was frozen and had fresh snow. Having 3 to 5 miles across and 52 miles long expanse with no brush, trees or grass, any movement as quickly observed.

                              Another tip for watching wildlife is raising domestic animals in Alaska. Several years ago I large flocks of turkeys and geese, they were great for attracting wolves and bears.

                              Another way to attract wildlife to your yard for observation and study is to set-up a predator call where you can watch from your window, and activate it a half hour before first daylight.

                              Thanks. We actually have spoken about this. We considered getting chickens an goats, so we looked up the best chickens for cold weather in Alaska. But our concern was we dont want our livestock to attract wildlife to our home, as much as we like wildlife. If a bear walks through our yard, great, Ill watch it from the kitchen window haha (but we do not expect tos ee any willife from our yard, even if everyone told us we will eventually see at least moose. Were trying not to set ourselves up for disappointment). But if wildlife coming to our home because our livestock looks like a good meal, wed prefer not to have a hungry bear there only because he wants to eat something like a chicken, or a person lol
                              Also, for the first 2-3 years we wont get any chickens, if we even do, because we want to travel some and visit places like Brooks Range, Kodiak, Aleutians, Unalaska, etc and dont want to be tied to staying at home those first 3 years.
                              Were actually concernnd even a dog or 2 may attract wildlife to our home because he looks like a piece of bacon to a bear.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Music Man View Post
                                A wolverine got a few pet rabbits last week on the Anchorage hillside.

                                maybe ill just get a thousand rabbits and see what happens haha

                                Comment

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