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Thinking of moving back to Alaska

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  • #16
    It's not a bother at all. I just expressed disbelief that personal political drivel was injected into a thread where there was no call for it. Substitute "con" for "lib" and the comment is just as applicable and truthful.

    In other words, it was 100% "pissin and moaning".

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Cheeser View Post
      It's not a bother at all. I just expressed disbelief that personal political drivel was injected into a thread where there was no call for it. Substitute "con" for "lib" and the comment is just as applicable and truthful.

      In other words, it was 100% "pissin and moaning".
      And you're reply 100% pissing and moaning about a guy pissin and moaning lol...

      Anchorage blows couldn't pay enough to live there.. it it's obvious you love the place.. as the say los anchorage you are only 20 minutes from the real Alaska..

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      • #18
        Originally posted by 323 View Post
        And you're reply 100% pissing and moaning about a guy pissin and moaning lol...

        Anchorage blows couldn't pay enough to live there.. it it's obvious you love the place.. as the say los anchorage you are only 20 minutes from the real Alaska..
        Did I say I loved the place? No need to make up stuff. Just ask.

        I've lived in enough places around the world where I don't play the "where I live is better than where you live" kindergarten game.

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        • #19
          There is no perfect location in Alaska. The happy hunting an fishing grounds require you to either be:
          a) independently wealthy
          b) take a vow of poverity
          c) work remotely

          If you have to work for a living, then it's a balance of where there is available work with your job skills and finding the time to enjoy Alaska.

          You can say money isn't important to you, but it's tough to enjoy Alaska unless you're making a 1/2 way decent living. If you have the opportunity to make a decent living in the Kenai area and want to live in Alaska, I'd jump on it.
          Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

          If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Paul H View Post
            There is no perfect location in Alaska. The happy hunting an fishing grounds require you to either be:
            a) independently wealthy
            b) take a vow of poverity
            c) work remotely

            If you have to work for a living, then it's a balance of where there is available work with your job skills and finding the time to enjoy Alaska.

            You can say money isn't important to you, but it's tough to enjoy Alaska unless you're making a 1/2 way decent living. If you have the opportunity to make a decent living in the Kenai area and want to live in Alaska, I'd jump on it.
            I'd certainly agree with this ^^^. If you can make the $$, it's easier to get out in Alaska (and therefore might weigh more on the "pro" side for moving back) than if you don't have the $$.

            Another point (from direct personal experience): The attractions of Alaska can be enjoyed at any age, late 20's to 60 (why's that # seem familiar ) but when one is young (below 45 IMO), it's "easier" and more "on point" to enjoy much of what Alaska has to offer....can still be done in one's 50's / 60's, but a lot more considerations of energy, physical fitness, general health etc have to factor in and those considerations are not always or directly offset by experience and understanding.

            Recognizing that it's not this simple, if one had a choice to spend 20 years in AK from age 29 - 49 or from age 49-69, I'd suggest the 29-49 period if other factors were not the decision-making factors. Again, it's not same thing, but after hiking through the muskeg for 8 hours looking for a moose, at age almost-60, I find myself (slightly) wanting the lodge with full bar on the XXX Ranch in Texas vs. the perfectly adequate wall tent pitched by a clear-running stream in AK. At almost 40, I wouldn't have cared about the accomodations....moose hunting was preferable to whitetail chasing no matter what. Still preferable, but one does get a hankering for more conveniences as one ages.

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            • #21
              If you are looking to be able to get fishing and hunting in close to home and on short evening trips I'd recommend southeast alaska. I do love the kenai peninsula and the river itself but most locations in southeast have at least half decent spring black bear hunting (excluding baranof, chichagof, and admirality) and sitka blacktail oppertunities. Saltwater fishing as well as stream fishing is decent as well, I'm from POW island originally and the fishing and hunting is excellent (saltwater and stream). I live in juneau now and the fishing and hunting is more limited and difficult for the most part but there are still good oppertunities. Fall trips up north for moose/caribou are pretty common for a lot of locals.

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              • #22
                The Kenai Peninsula is not a sportsman's paradise. On top of that (unless you are a winter person) during the best time of the year you'll be competing with half of Anchorage fleeing the city (can't blame them), so camping/picnic/fishing spots are at a premium or unavailable.
                Kenai and Soldotna are growing, but still have a small town feel. Good people here. But if you're serious about most big game and waterfowl, you'll have to go elsewhere to hunt it. Most serious hunters down here do.

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