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  • Trying to plan a move a couple years away

    my brain is fried, i have been researching and researching
    I am a junior in high school planing to move to Montana to work on a ranch. Then move to Alaska and i will be driving.
    what is the best time to move and are there any entry level jobs in Fairbanks. preferably outdoors all the time jobs i like working with my hands and plan on applying for the electricians union in Fairbanks, but the requirement is you must live in Alaska for 1 year first before you may even apply.

    thanks

  • #2
    Former military here - try talking to a recruiter and find out if you can enlist with a guaranteed duty station in Alaska. Army and Air Force have bases in AK. That would give you some job training and a job for a few years while you see if you like AK.


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    • #3
      Originally posted by dwm4375 View Post
      Former military here - try talking to a recruiter and find out if you can enlist with a guaranteed duty station in Alaska. Army and Air Force have bases in AK. That would give you some job training and a job for a few years while you see if you like AK.


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
      Great advise. Check into combat engineer field. Might have electrician segment.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ak47nutter View Post
        my brain is fried, i have been researching and researching
        I am a junior in high school planing to move to Montana to work on a ranch. Then move to Alaska and i will be driving.
        what is the best time to move and are there any entry level jobs in Fairbanks. preferably outdoors all the time jobs i like working with my hands and plan on applying for the electricians union in Fairbanks, but the requirement is you must live in Alaska for 1 year first before you may even apply.
        thanks
        There are ways to make the transition to a union apprenticeship easier and quicker. Give local 1547 IBEW in Anch or Fairbanks a call. Early efforts on your part can impress officials and give you a leg up on other applicants. Sometimes even eliminating waiting periods. Find and talk to those in the trade you seek to enter and start asking for advise and direction. Good luck on your quest.
        Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine! :whistle:
        WWG1WGA! QANON

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        • #5
          My dad is an electrician he has been explaining how the union and apprentice ship works
          thanks

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          • #6
            Not really interested in the military but thanks

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            • #7
              ...in Fairbanks. preferably outdoors all the time... (ha ha!)

              Cod is in the right ballpark. I spent years sitting on the committee that selects the apprentices for the IBEW in Alaska.
              After the year of residency, there will almost surely be another year of waiting. It is almost impossible to get in the apprenticeship on your first application. The number of applicants that we see up here is impressive. Some years we see over a hundred for very few slots. There are a lot of over qualified people also, including guys with multiple college degrees. Unless you are something special, you will not get in your first year. (the committee loves to see if you want it bad enough to keep trying)

              My advise to you is this. Join the union where you are as soon as you can.

              You have connections there and they can make the difference. I would also suggest that you look into being a lineman. We work outdoors in every part of the state. In all weather and terrain. We run heavy equipment and visit wild places. I have gotten to work in everything from a skiff to a helicopter and everything in between. Linemen are in high demand almost year around. We make more money and build a better pension. (Plus we are a tight knit bunch)

              Either way, once in the union apprenticeship, you can start the process of transferring your apprenticeship to Alaska. It is common for locals to allow apes to move. You may have to have a reason (sick Uncle needs help etc) but it gets you in here faster. If the local in your area is not putting apes to work, find a local nearby that is. Then transfer.

              If Montana is a must, then still start your apprenticeship where you can. (see if Montana is hiring) Take a year off (sometimes allowed w a reason) go to Montana then get back to work. Then transfer north. Once you get your lineman ticket, you can work almost anywhere in the states. Linemen are in demand world wide. It has been very good to me. It is a rough and dangerous trade, but it is not boring.

              Good luck and learn everything you can until you apply. Most of the above also applies to the electrician trade, but they go to work at the same place for months, inside work and lower pay. Zzzzzzzz.
              Live life and love it
              Love life and live it

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              • #8
                my uncle is a lineman is the lineman apprenticeship also flooded.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by bullbuster View Post
                  Cod is in the right ballpark. I spent years sitting on the committee that selects the apprentices for the IBEW in Alaska.
                  After the year of residency, there will almost surely be another year of waiting. It is almost impossible to get in the apprenticeship on your first application. The number of applicants that we see up here is impressive. Some years we see over a hundred for very few slots. There are a lot of over qualified people also, including guys with multiple college degrees. Unless you are something special, you will not get in your first year. (the committee loves to see if you want it bad enough to keep trying)

                  My advise to you is this. Join the union where you are as soon as you can.

                  You have connections there and they can make the difference. I would also suggest that you look into being a lineman. We work outdoors in every part of the state. In all weather and terrain. We run heavy equipment and visit wild places. I have gotten to work in everything from a skiff to a helicopter and everything in between. Linemen are in high demand almost year around. We make more money and build a better pension. (Plus we are a tight knit bunch)

                  Either way, once in the union apprenticeship, you can start the process of transferring your apprenticeship to Alaska. It is common for locals to allow apes to move. You may have to have a reason (sick Uncle needs help etc) but it gets you in here faster. If the local in your area is not putting apes to work, find a local nearby that is. Then transfer.

                  If Montana is a must, then still start your apprenticeship where you can. (see if Montana is hiring) Take a year off (sometimes allowed w a reason) go to Montana then get back to work. Then transfer north. Once you get your lineman ticket, you can work almost anywhere in the states. Linemen are in demand world wide. It has been very good to me. It is a rough and dangerous trade, but it is not boring.

                  Good luck and learn everything you can until you apply. Most of the above also applies to the electrician trade, but they go to work at the same place for months, inside work and lower pay. Zzzzzzzz.
                  You said a mouth full there. My son is a lineman and has worked in about every area of the state. They just got back right before Christmas from Buckland and will head to Stebbins on Jan. 5th. for 3-4 months. He loves the village work and is alway anxious to head to a new place.
                  Vegetables arenít food, vegetables are what food eats.

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                  • #10
                    The best time to move is when you have about $5,000 in your pocket and June is several weeks off. Living in your rig makes the money last.


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                    • #11
                      Has anyone every mushed or has been a handler for sled dogs I have been trying to find out what jobs are available in fair banks or wasilla until I get into the apprentice ship that are not just for the summer.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Ak47nutter View Post
                        Has anyone every mushed or has been a handler for sled dogs I have been trying to find out what jobs are available in fair banks or wasilla until I get into the apprentice ship that are not just for the summer.
                        It's possible you could find a gig working as a handler, sometimes for room/board. Watch the classifieds in the back of Mushing Magazine. Consider joining the Alaska Dog Mushers Association, and fishing around through the organization. Someone may put you in touch with someone who needs help.
                        ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
                        I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
                        The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It

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                        • #13
                          For the most part if you get a job as a handler for a team, all you will get out of it is room/board....and a lot of dog experience. These jobs are really geared to people that want to be a musher.

                          I think you're going to have a hard time getting a job up here right off the bat as an electrician or something similar. I know of a few people that worked as a union laborer for a while before applying for the IBEW, might give that some thought.

                          Good luck

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by oakman View Post
                            For the most part if you get a job as a handler for a team, all you will get out of it is room/board....and a lot of dog experience. These jobs are really geared to people that want to be a musher.

                            I think you're going to have a hard time getting a job up here right off the bat as an electrician or something similar. I know of a few people that worked as a union laborer for a while before applying for the IBEW, might give that some thought.

                            Good luck
                            Thanks i did not know it would just be room and board

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by oakman View Post
                              For the most part if you get a job as a handler for a team, all you will get out of it is room/board....and a lot of dog experience. These jobs are really geared to people that want to be a musher.

                              I think you're going to have a hard time getting a job up here right off the bat as an electrician or something similar. I know of a few people that worked as a union laborer for a while before applying for the IBEW, might give that some thought.

                              Good luck
                              Ill look into that thanks

                              Comment

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