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  • aknome
    replied
    "Things like a wood splitter, generator, tools, atv, one of two boats, etc..."
    All of these can be found new and used in Abundance in every town or the road system and the larger places in the bush. (Bethel, Nome, Kotz, Dillingham, etc)
    The only stuff you need to pack are the things you can't replace: Dad's pre 64 Model 70, Model 12 or something along those lines. The wife may have some things like that also.

    Leave a comment:


  • LeonardC
    replied
    Lots of great information here. We were going to drive through Canada this summer & haul our first load up in a trailer, but our plans fell through, so I flew up instead. Nice to know it's a "per person" limit on ammo. I tried to get some answers from their web site for powder limits, but they just sent me to another web site with no clear answers.

    Watch those 10/22 magazines. Canada has a limit on # of rounds a mag. can hold??

    During my way too brief stay near Wasilla, I didn't see any .22 ammo. Powder was spotty. Only hand gun powders I saw were 4227 & Blue Dot. Noticed rifle powder in IMR 4895 & 4064 in a couple of stores (Artic Ammo, SWH, & Three Bears), a few others were available, but nothing I was interested in. I drove by SWH on the previous Tuesday & they didn't have any powder (well they did have 50 BMG & some other stuff), but when I stopped in a day or two latter they had several kinds of rifle powders on the shelf. Seems like everyone had a good selection of primers.

    Leave a comment:


  • Yukon Cornelius
    replied
    Originally posted by Arrowchaser View Post
    I tried to look up the info earlier on and some sites were saying something like 200 and 1500 rounds for competition.
    I dug deeper after reading your reply. It's much easier to find info on guns than it is to find ammo info. I found the 5k
    here- http://canadaonline.about.com/gi/o.h.../index-eng.htm

    So yes you and Mobius are correct. Do you know if the Canadian gun fee is a one time thing or charged for each gun? I still have some with barrels that are too short. I thought I read that revolver (handgun) barrels have to be over 4 inches long. I have to double check that.

    I'm also wondering about taking a 22-10 Takedown semi-auto.

    It also depends on where we end up. A place like Wrangell would require a ferry from either direction. But Kenai area could be driven to by way of Canada.

    I guess the 5000 cartridges could weigh more or less depending on the caliber. Something like 22 LR would weigh less because it would be similar to taking 10 - 500 22 LR round boxes. One 500 round 22 LR box is around 4 pounds. So the ferry would allow 16.25 boxes of 22 LR. In that case the ferry allows more. -- 30-06 (20) round box weighs around 1.5 pounds. So if I figured it right I could take 43.33 boxes of 30-06 on the ferry. Which would be around 866.66 rounds of 30-06 on the ferry. So in that case it would be better to go through Canada.

    But if two people could take 5000 each then Canada would clearly be better no matter what the caliber.

    I probably messed something up in the calculations. I've been trying to figure out what sized trailer I should buy. Should it have two axles? What I can fit? How much do certain things weigh? It's 2 am and my mind is tired.
    You do know you can mail your long rifles and shotguns right? It cost me $35 to ship my 30-06 and a shotgun from GA to Ak including insurance. Guns arrived in three days. I mailed them in a case that locked but you can actually mail in a regular box. Handguns can't be shipped but you can through a FFl.
    As far as ammo...5000 is a lot of rounds. You can buy ammo up here.

    not sure about the take down through canada. ARs are a no no.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arrowchaser
    replied
    Originally posted by romadhawk View Post
    You can take 5,000 rounds (or primed cases) per adult over the age of 18 through Canada. Please do your homework and go prepared.
    I just made the move up again, last month.
    I tried to look up the info earlier on and some sites were saying something like 200 and 1500 rounds for competition.
    I dug deeper after reading your reply. It's much easier to find info on guns than it is to find ammo info. I found the 5k
    here- http://canadaonline.about.com/gi/o.h.../index-eng.htm

    So yes you and Mobius are correct. Do you know if the Canadian gun fee is a one time thing or charged for each gun? I still have some with barrels that are too short. I thought I read that revolver (handgun) barrels have to be over 4 inches long. I have to double check that.

    I'm also wondering about taking a 22-10 Takedown semi-auto.

    It also depends on where we end up. A place like Wrangell would require a ferry from either direction. But Kenai area could be driven to by way of Canada.

    I guess the 5000 cartridges could weigh more or less depending on the caliber. Something like 22 LR would weigh less because it would be similar to taking 10 - 500 22 LR round boxes. One 500 round 22 LR box is around 4 pounds. So the ferry would allow 16.25 boxes of 22 LR. In that case the ferry allows more. -- 30-06 (20) round box weighs around 1.5 pounds. So if I figured it right I could take 43.33 boxes of 30-06 on the ferry. Which would be around 866.66 rounds of 30-06 on the ferry. So in that case it would be better to go through Canada.

    But if two people could take 5000 each then Canada would clearly be better no matter what the caliber.

    I probably messed something up in the calculations. I've been trying to figure out what sized trailer I should buy. Should it have two axles? What I can fit? How much do certain things weigh? It's 2 am and my mind is tired.

    Leave a comment:


  • romadhawk
    replied
    You can take 5,000 rounds (or primed cases) per adult over the age of 18 through Canada. Please do your homework and go prepared.
    I just made the move up again, last month.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arrowchaser
    replied
    I don't want anyone to think that I don't read their replies. I would much rather learn from other peoples mistakes or successes. I never want to be the person that doesn't even learn from his or her own mistakes. - We've been trying to take steps each day towards moving. Some days we take baby steps and other days we take big steps. I was able to finally sell my motorcycle yesterday. It's sad to see it go but it allows us to move forward some. We still have some larger items to sell. I've also been looking for a enclosed trailer to pull behind my truck.

    Leave a comment:


  • soon2beinAK
    replied
    We are in the same process right now. It has been a 2 year journey spiritually, financially and emotionally. We began sacrificing back then, and continue every day to re-evaluate what we 'think' we need. How it has changed.

    Soul searching......thats the best way to describe it. Not easy, but definitely worth the effort.

    And tell yourself to just keep moving forward. Otherwise you will end up right where you are. And you must not want to be there, or you wouldn't be headed to AK, right? :-)

    Good luck! Fingers crossed........

    Leave a comment:


  • Yukon Cornelius
    replied
    Originally posted by Arrowchaser View Post
    I think you can only take 200 rounds of ammunition into Canada and the Alaskan ferry allows 65 pounds.
    You also can't take things like bear spray or handguns with barrels under 4 inches long through Canada. Canada also charges a fee for people to transport their rifles. Passports are also required to travel through Canada. Which is okay if we had more time to get passports. Passports can take 4-6 weeks to get.
    it than 200 rounds. There is a small fee for rifles but I am sure all the fees will add up to less than the cost of taking the barge. The barge route costs per vehicle them per person. We looked at it this summer instead if driving through CAnada and our cost with a family of four (but I believe our two kids were free because of their ages) was going to cost $3500 and that was just us plus the car.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arrowchaser
    replied
    Originally posted by Mobius View Post
    Is there some reason you can't drive through Canada? I moved up last year with my family. We priced shipping, barging, ferry, flying, movers, etc. The cheapest route was renting a U-haul and driving up (including gas, hotels, and food). We did have to pare down a LOT. I mean a LOT. Most of it was a large garage sale. Gave a TON of stuff to charity (tax write off). And in the end, the day before we drove out, we slipped the trash guys $100 to take the rest away. We're a family of 5 plus my M-I-L. We fit it all into a 26' U-haul.

    Then, what we didn't have, we are replacing as we go up here.

    BTW, driving through Canada, you can take a LOT more ammo.
    I think you can only take 200 rounds of ammunition into Canada and the Alaskan ferry allows 65 pounds.
    You also can't take things like bear spray or handguns with barrels under 4 inches long through Canada. Canada also charges a fee for people to transport their rifles. Passports are also required to travel through Canada. Which is okay if we had more time to get passports. Passports can take 4-6 weeks to get.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mobius
    replied
    Is there some reason you can't drive through Canada? I moved up last year with my family. We priced shipping, barging, ferry, flying, movers, etc. The cheapest route was renting a U-haul and driving up (including gas, hotels, and food). We did have to pare down a LOT. I mean a LOT. Most of it was a large garage sale. Gave a TON of stuff to charity (tax write off). And in the end, the day before we drove out, we slipped the trash guys $100 to take the rest away. We're a family of 5 plus my M-I-L. We fit it all into a 26' U-haul.

    Then, what we didn't have, we are replacing as we go up here.

    BTW, driving through Canada, you can take a LOT more ammo.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arrowchaser
    replied
    Originally posted by YellowstoneShane View Post
    We moved up to Girdwood in April. We sold some things, gave away a lot, and kept a lot. I learned a lot of lessons in the process too.

    You should really sit down and think about what you are going to need or not when you get here. It's expensive to transport items such a long distance, but it's also expensive to buy things in Alaska. So if you are going to need it later (I mean, really need it), then you should consider keeping it.

    It also depends on what your lifestyle is going to be here. For example, if you are going to sell your $2000 couch for $50 on craigslist and then buy another $2000 couch (for $2500 in AK), maybe you should keep it!

    I sold or gave away a few things I wish I still had. My 4-wheeler, a trailer, and some tools are among the things that I wish I'd kept because I am building a cabin out by Willow right now, and I am going to need a trailer and some of those tools I sold.

    After moving to Girdwood, I ended up taking about 10 boxes of basically junk to the thrift store. I should have just gotten rid of that stuff in Colorado.

    Then there's the wife's stuff. Yeah. We brought all of that. Useful or not! LOL

    All told, move moved a 3 bedroom house worth of crap about 3500 miles in a Ford F150 and a 27 foot UHaul along with 3 kids, a dog and a cat. (Probably should have just left the cat in Colorado! Just kidding). It cost over $6,000 to move that way, but with a family and the season, we stayed in hotels along the way. The biggest expense was the UHAUL and the gas though. Gas for the uHaul was about $2000.

    If it was just me, I would have just brought a backpack, some clothes, my chainsaw, tools and guns. But I have a family, and in this society it's not always the right thing to do to just dump your junk.

    By the way. Storage sheds are pretty expensive here too.
    I'm working on getting a enclosed trailer. Then I could always use it as a shed for a little while later. Then maybe sell it.
    The one thing I refuse to give up is my atv. I rely on it too much to give it up.

    Leave a comment:


  • YellowstoneShane
    replied
    We moved up to Girdwood in April. We sold some things, gave away a lot, and kept a lot. I learned a lot of lessons in the process too.

    You should really sit down and think about what you are going to need or not when you get here. It's expensive to transport items such a long distance, but it's also expensive to buy things in Alaska. So if you are going to need it later (I mean, really need it), then you should consider keeping it.

    It also depends on what your lifestyle is going to be here. For example, if you are going to sell your $2000 couch for $50 on craigslist and then buy another $2000 couch (for $2500 in AK), maybe you should keep it!

    I sold or gave away a few things I wish I still had. My 4-wheeler, a trailer, and some tools are among the things that I wish I'd kept because I am building a cabin out by Willow right now, and I am going to need a trailer and some of those tools I sold.

    After moving to Girdwood, I ended up taking about 10 boxes of basically junk to the thrift store. I should have just gotten rid of that stuff in Colorado.

    Then there's the wife's stuff. Yeah. We brought all of that. Useful or not! LOL

    All told, move moved a 3 bedroom house worth of crap about 3500 miles in a Ford F150 and a 27 foot UHaul along with 3 kids, a dog and a cat. (Probably should have just left the cat in Colorado! Just kidding). It cost over $6,000 to move that way, but with a family and the season, we stayed in hotels along the way. The biggest expense was the UHAUL and the gas though. Gas for the uHaul was about $2000.

    If it was just me, I would have just brought a backpack, some clothes, my chainsaw, tools and guns. But I have a family, and in this society it's not always the right thing to do to just dump your junk.

    By the way. Storage sheds are pretty expensive here too.

    Leave a comment:


  • Yukon Cornelius
    replied
    Originally posted by Arrowchaser View Post
    We have been trying to work towards moving to AK from Pa. How did you thin down your stuff? I have read suggestions that people should bring less. I have been trying to sell a really nice motorcycle with low miles for two
    years now. Things just don't seem to be selling. We had a yard sale and priced things
    really low but didn't sell much. I am seeing a lot of craigslist ads that were advertised last year. People
    just don't seem to be buying much. How did you do it? How long did it take you?

    It's tough because we are older w/kids and have a lifetime collection of stuff. I have come to love it when something breaks because
    I can just throw it away.
    What part of the state are you wanting to move to? Why?
    What sort of jobs are you looking for?

    My wife and I were able to secure jobs up here while we were on vacation in Puerto Rico. We have two small children and one was born during summer break.

    I understand the jobs not calling back. You're not here. They want a commit. I don't recommend this but could you move in waves? You come up to land the job and find a place to rent, while wife sells stuff?

    Moving to Alaska is not cheap. And I am not sure I would have done it without landing a job first. We interviewed via Skype. Mailed the essentials and came up with our clothes. Then mailed our clothes to bring in food.

    We are all here to help.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arrowchaser
    replied
    Originally posted by Paul H View Post
    If the military is paying to move your personal belongings, you'll likely have a different perspective on the advantages of paring down what you move.

    I'd say try to categorize your possessions into a few different categories:

    Items you use regularly, i.e. daily, weekly, monthly
    Heirlooms and items that would be difficult or impossible to replace
    Items you rarely use, i.e. having used in over a year.

    If you haven't used an item in over a year, and it's not an heirloom or difficult to replace, sell it or give it away

    If an item is used regularly, is in good shape, and/or worth more than several $'s per pound and/or is an heirloom keep it.

    If a regularly used item could use replacement or will cost more to ship than it's worth it, sell it or give it away.
    I wish the military was paying for us to move. I remember all the stuff the military moved back from Europe for my brother years ago.

    We've been narrowing things down to sell, keep, donate and throw away. Then we pause. And then we do it all over again.
    Every time we do it we are willing to part with more stuff.

    I wish I would have moved years ago. It's tougher doing it with kids. We have moved before but not that far away. A lot of stuff to balance. Then we still have to live here while we are trying to move there. So things pop up like should I cut more firewood for next winter. I like to have one or two years worth of wood ahead of time. Balancing school years and trying to sell seasonal items like motorcycles within a certain time period. Then there seems to be a window of opportunity for moving as far as weather and seasons go. Balancing a job search with a home search. Then people call back and ask if we can come in for a interview. Then we say we're in Pa and never hear anything again. It would cost around 6500 for us to fly up as a family. Then the hotels, car rental, etc... I would just rather save the money for the move or to put it into a home. I guess it will all come together at some point.

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul H
    replied
    Originally posted by Arrowchaser View Post
    I replied earlier but the post didn't go through.
    We have been looking for information from different sources. I have read where people have suggested selling stuff and then buying
    more in Alaska. We have also talked to a couple people in Alaska that have suggested the same. I would love to be able to just have everything we
    own appear in Alaska at our new home. I usually save things for a second purpose. So I usually never need to rush to a store for parts,
    nuts, bolts, etc... I guess I have hit a point in my life where I feel like things hold us down. But still have a hard time letting go of some things.
    But we have sold and given away a lot so far.
    While trying to figure out the capacity of the trailer I would like to get after the motorcycle sells, I realized that it is going to fill up quick. So I started to read about shipping companies. I read that it could cost something like 2.18 per pound for shipping. Our gym equipment would be very helpful during the winter months in Alaska. My dumbbells alone would cost more to ship than they originally cost to buy. Then there's the tools, atv, splitter, etc... I wish I could talk one of my tractor trailer driving cousins into driving some stuff up through Canada.
    I have also been reading about moving things like ammunition. The ferry limit is something like 65 pounds. I would hate to sell ammo right now considering how hard it is to find. But I would also hate to mail it up just to have it lost in the mail. We bought my father-in-law a camera once and someone stole it somewhere along the way. We had it insured but they didn't want to pay because they said they delivered it. We had to push for them to honor the insurance.
    We might rent our current home to a family member. If so, we could leave some things stored here. So the most important thing would be to sell my motorcycle right now. We try to make some kind of progress each day.
    If the military is paying to move your personal belongings, you'll likely have a different perspective on the advantages of paring down what you move.

    I'd say try to categorize your possessions into a few different categories:

    Items you use regularly, i.e. daily, weekly, monthly
    Heirlooms and items that would be difficult or impossible to replace
    Items you rarely use, i.e. having used in over a year.

    If you haven't used an item in over a year, and it's not an heirloom or difficult to replace, sell it or give it away

    If an item is used regularly, is in good shape, and/or worth more than several $'s per pound and/or is an heirloom keep it.

    If a regularly used item could use replacement or will cost more to ship than it's worth it, sell it or give it away.

    Leave a comment:

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