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  • Sourdough Starter

    I did a search for this and didn't come across one. Does anyone have any recipes? Thought I'd check here for some tried and true advice before doing an internet search. Any ideas, hints, recipes welcomed.

  • #2
    I actually just went through this same thing looking for a starter to give as a gift, and decided to buy something off the internet. Supposed to have its origins traced back to the Oregon Trail, could be total bull, dunno. In any event, it only cost me a few dollars and a stamp, so what the heck. If it shows up and is as advertised I will post more about it, I just don't want to send anyone down a bunny trail for nothing. Look on Google and you will find there is a TON of stuff.

    Cheers,
    Jay
    “The mountains are calling and I must go.” - John Muir

    "Better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

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    • #3
      Guys... it's so easy!
      1.) ask your neighbor for some;
      2.) leave out some regular pancake batter for a week and wait for it to ferment;
      3.) mix some potato water (after boiling potatoes) with flour and sugar and let it ferment for a week.

      The little spores are floating around everywhere, just waiting to help you out for free!

      You can also buy the powdered stuff at places like the Ulu Factory, probably even the tourist section of Wallmart or Freddy's.

      When you get some, drop me a line and I'll learn you how to make killer pancakes.

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      • #4
        I'll start scrounging around to see what I can find too. If it requires molding something I'm the right person! Seriously, though, I've been making homemade breads for a while now wanting to venture into other types. Let us know how yours turns out Jackson's Dad.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by sayak View Post
          Guys... it's so easy!
          1.) ask your neighbor for some;
          2.) leave out some regular pancake batter for a week and wait for it to ferment;
          3.) mix some potato water (after boiling potatoes) with flour and sugar and let it ferment for a week.

          The little spores are floating around everywhere, just waiting to help you out for free!

          You can also buy the powdered stuff at places like the Ulu Factory, probably even the tourist section of Wallmart or Freddy's.

          When you get some, drop me a line and I'll learn you how to make killer pancakes.
          I heard #3 thats what I am going to try, have you tried it that way? if not anyone here?
          Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
          "Rebellion is in my blood, I was born an American"
          Μολών λαβέ

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          • #6
            If you have access to real kefir, made with kefir grains and not a culture, then just add 1 cup kefir to 1 cup flour and you have your starter.

            Otherwise, just use your wild yeast. Each area will have a unique wild yeast and a unique flavor. As long as it does not start growing mold then you are OK. It might be hard to capture a wild strain this time of year, I have had the best luck outside.
            It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

            http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

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            • #7
              If you dissolve yeast in warm water add flour and let it sit covered in a warm place you will have sourdough in a few days. Keep adding flour and warm water every few days to feed it. It's really that simple.
              Art is making something out of nothing and selling it.
              - Frank Zappa

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              • #8
                I had some of this starter a number of years ago, it worked well, but I accidentaly killed it and never replaced it. It is free, you just send them a self addressed stamped envelope.
                http://carlsfriends.net/source.html

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                • #9
                  I originally started out last year with a starter kit that was included in an Alaskan sourdough book, killed it. Then I had a home brew (yeast from store) for about 2 months and I killed it too. I have 2 starter jars (same strain) now and done with natural yeast, one in Wasilla (home) and 1 in Seward (work). Had these going since July 2010. Trick is too keep it out of direct sunlight and after using, feed it and store in fridge, they keep for a month or so, depending on temp and ammount in the fridge without disturbance. The cold actually slows down the fermentation process. All you need to start a new starter is to: Scald a glass jar, mix 1 or 2 cups of ALL PURPOSE FLOUR ONLY, mix with luke warm water to pancake batter thickness, leave uncovered in warm area, kitchen, by stove is where I start them at. Leave uncovered for about 2-3 days, in which time natural yeast in the air will mix with starter and begin to fermentate. Place lid on (with pin hole) I pop a hole in the metal PB lid with a nail to vent it (Adam's peanut butter jars work the best). If you let it set for about a week on the counter, you will begin to smell it and see the liquid (alcohol/hooch) build up on top as well as throughout the starter. In about a week it'll be ready. When you use it, add same amount of water/flour mixture back to it, that's feeding it. Place in fridge and use when needed. Make sure you use non metalic utensils, bowls, spoons, whisks, or it can kill the starter, the metal and yeast don't get along. I mix with a wooded or plastic spoon only, and start my pancake mix the night before in a plastic bowl, let sit overnight before use. Sounds alot harder than it really is. The hardest part is the start up process, kill it a time or 2 and you get better at it. Sourdough pancakes are well worth the wait though. That's what's for breakfast tomorrow!
                  It's a Jeep thing, you wouldn't understand.

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                  • #10
                    when you get your starter up and running do a google search for sourdough and Peckham. He has about nine printed pages of recipes for sourdough breads and everything. So far every one that I have tried has turned out awesome. My mom made his sticky bun recipe and said that they were the best ever. Good luck.

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                    • #11
                      OK Y'all... if you're looking into sourdough starters on the web, you are going to find a TON of conflicting advice that varies from downright poor all the way to excellent. I've been baking with sourdough for 40 years and know what I am doing ...but if you don't want to trust just one person, then head on over to The Fresh Loaf at http://www.thefreshloaf.com and search on how to start a new starter. Lots of good information there, including on how to avoid the 'fake start' that occurs if your flour has a leuconostoc infection which is common in much of today's flours. OR, if you are in the Anchorage/Valley area, I'm happy to share a bit of my own starter to help you get started and I'll tell you what to do with it (haha ...how to use it that is). Mine was started several years ago in Fairbanks and now lives west of Wasilla. Save yourself some trouble and go with a starter from someone who's got a successful one or learn how to start one on your own and have the patience to do it. BTW, the Carl's starter mentioned above does originate on the Oregon Trail, but has also 'lived' in many locations and is now on the east coast. It's a fine starter that works well and the price could not be cheaper (postage only) and I can recommend it ...but note that starters do change depending on the environment where they are currently kept. Carl's is no longer what it was on the Oregon Trail, but it is nonetheless a good starter that all who have tried it like. It's your call. Lots of people in Alaska have starters to share...


                      Brian

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                      • #12
                        Here's bread that I made with my starter just this weekend:

                        Click image for larger version

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                        Brian

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                        • #13
                          I have starter from Juneau circa 1984 but has lived with me in Michigan since it's birth. I could dry some wafers and send them to you if interested. Re-constitute similar to conventional yeast. Grind to a powder, add some warm (not hot) water and a bit of sugar...few days later and you have sourdough starter.

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