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Buying a Cow or Pig for slaughter questions...

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  • AKDoug
    replied
    You are going to pay a $1 a pound live weight in Alaska at a minimum for beef or pork. Add to that your processing fees at a meat cutter and the price is going to be even higher.

    I have raised both beef and pork in the Talkeetna area. The only benefit from doing your own is the knowledge of where your meat came from. When it was all done I could have called any local butcher shop and paid less.

    As far as buying on the hoof...most "farmers" in Alaska have no problem getting their asking price for their beef and hogs. They aren't screwing anyone when you figure in the fact that this is a hard environment to raise animals in.

    Because they always screw you on the price.
    It's really unfortunate you feel this way.

    Paying $80 for a larger wiener pig (40-50lbs) as mentioned above is a hard way to start if you look at return on your investment.
    I paid $50 for weiner pigs when the price my grandfather in Montana was getting was .15 a pound. Totally different world up here. Hogs do grow well up here and I was able to get pigs to market weight almost a week faster than my grandfather's commercial opperation. The cooler temps in Alaska have a lot to do with it. However, before he passed away, he was paying about 1/2 for his feed as I was. So, starting with a weiner that cost 10 times as much and feed that was twice as much, I could have simply bought pork at the market for less than I raised it.

    Beef is even worse. I had to have steers on about 360 days of grain and hay and only 180 days of pasture. In my grandfather's area he could get away with suplemental feeding on a grass raised steer for 60 days or less. Steers up here took me 18 months from birth to get to market weight.

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  • upinak
    replied
    I spoke to someone who's phone forwarded to Michigan. Why it did that... I have no clue, but I am not paying for something that is coming out of Michigan when i can pay a Alaskan Farmer. So I stopped and asked questions. No one has "sponsered' any names.. but that is ok, at least I have a good idea what to ask when I start calling.

    Originally posted by Alasken View Post
    Which really has nothing to do with most of your original questions. Have you talked to anyone who is selling live animals for slaughter?

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  • Alasken
    replied
    Originally posted by upinak View Post
    Because they always screw you on the price.
    Which really has nothing to do with most of your original questions. Have you talked to anyone who is selling live animals for slaughter?

    Leave a comment:


  • AKFishOn
    replied
    From the little I have seen here, those folks that raise hogs to sell at a large scale do it quickly, you can not expect to raise a hog cost effectively if not feed properly. Hogs sold at 8 months (normal average weight was 232lbs) have food all they want all day and night long, also they have the correct minerals and vitamin additives in their feed. Up here you will hear talk of outrageous feed prices well they are currently outrageous everywhere, barley use to be considered high price at $6 a 100, and at times over the past few years hit $20, if you can find it. Add to that the Alaska prices and it is not cost effective to raise hogs unless you are very large scale, which there are no large scale hog farms in Alaska. The high prices of feed have made it not cost effective to raise them in the lower 48 for small and medium operations, I know two farms in Montana that closed in the last two years that were selling more than 1,000 a year and you can not compete with the larger operations who sell more than that in a month. I guess if you could get feed for free you could make a go of it for a couple of hogs but you will spend considerable more time in raising them (to preferred weight) maybe you could then call it a hobby?

    Paying $80 for a larger wiener pig (40-50lbs) as mentioned above is a hard way to start if you look at return on your investment.

    Just my 2 cents…

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  • upinak
    replied
    Because they always screw you on the price.

    Originally posted by Alasken View Post
    Why don't you ask the person you would be buying the animal from?

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  • Alasken
    replied
    Why don't you ask the person you would be buying the animal from?

    Leave a comment:


  • Vince
    replied
    last time i bought pigs.. they were about 2 months old and nearly 40-50 lbs at the time.. 85 bucks a head... we bought 3. i feed them from the scraps of the soup kitchen in town and donated one back to them in the fall. OCT 15 smallest was 245lb. in sept i moved them over to grain 2 meals a day with all the fruit and veggies the kitchen could toss at us.. bread to. all in all i paid for about 200dollars worth of feed.


    you can toss lower 48 market price right out the window here. you'll get what the market can bare price.

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  • AKFishOn
    replied
    I will attempt to answer your question in the Hog area my folks sold many (1,000+ per year) where I grew up of that about 5-10 per year were locals who wanted a hog the rest were sold destin for the big slaughter house.

    1. When you buy the cow/pig via the farmer, are you responsible for the food for it and cleaning of stalls? (I heard in some states you do this, so I am curious)
    - You will normally buy a market hog, it has been fed/raised and is ready to sell.

    2. How much does a pig or a cow go for either calf/piglet or full grown?
    - We would charge $10 more than market costs, hogs are low now ~35 cents a lb, maybe more but a couple years back they were real low, so a 210lb market hog would run less than $100, cheap but that was in Montana, I see crazy folks up here wanting a $1 a lb on Craigs List.

    3. How old should the animal be before slaughter and processing? I am thinking around 8 months.
    - Hogs often are generally 6 months old (200+ lbs), all depends on what they are eating, imagine older up here longer (longer time to reach market size) as there are no large operations, it is colder, feed is expensive and the list as to a slow growth rate goes on.

    4. Do you have to put the animal down OR is there a place around that will slaughter them?
    - Normally we, depending on the situation, would help the individual buyer, many people wanted a whole hog for a roast and then we sold them smaller hogs. Ssometimes we put them down and bled them out off the tractor bucket but most often they came and picked them up with a stock rack.

    I like to stick to moose and fish.

    Leave a comment:


  • upinak
    started a topic Buying a Cow or Pig for slaughter questions...

    Buying a Cow or Pig for slaughter questions...

    A couple of us in here were talking about this, but I think I would like some more information on how it works. If anyone else has done this, can you point me (and the others) in a good direction?

    1. When you buy the cow/pig via the farmer, are you responsible for the food for it and cleaning of stalls? (I heard in some states you do this, so I am curious)
    2. How much does a pig or a cow go for either calf/piglet or full grown?
    3. How old should the animal be before slaughter and processing? I am thinking around 8 months.
    4. Do you have to put the animal down OR is there a place around that will slaughter them?

    I have NO clue on this and any advice on this would be very appreciated.

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