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Planted Tomatoes in GH today

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  • Planted Tomatoes in GH today

    Soil temp 71f (heat tape in soil boxes)
    Will cover at night.
    GH got to 76f today. (partly sunny day, 44f)
    Figured I'd try the tomatoes. (held some back-ups just in case)
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Originally posted by mudbuddy View Post
    Soil temp 71f (heat tape in soil boxes)
    Will cover at night.
    GH got to 76f today. (partly sunny day, 44f)
    Figured I'd try the tomatoes. (held some back-ups just in case)
    R U kidding me?? I want one of those greenhouses! I'm so ready to start gardening.

    Can we see pics of your greenhouse. I'm trying to talk my husband into building me a heated/semi-heated greenhouse so I can start earlier in the year.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by AKHuntressNP View Post
      R U kidding me?? I want one of those greenhouses! I'm so ready to start gardening.

      Can we see pics of your greenhouse. I'm trying to talk my husband into building me a heated/semi-heated greenhouse so I can start earlier in the year.
      I don't heat the GH, I heat the soil boxes with heat tape in the bottom, Plant deep & cover at night.
      The warm soil keep them warm at night.
      GH 8 X 12, 2X4s ,Barn style & tie downs to hold up in wind
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #4
        I tried something different. I am not quite sure what effect it may have or even how well it will work in the long run. But I backed our greenhouse up to our dryer vent on the outside of our house and extended the vent into the house. So far it has added heat and humidity. There are no plants in it yet they are all inside still because it is far too cold at night still. But when I was inside there is was HOT and humid and we usually do a load of laundry every other day to keep from having to do a bunch of loads at once. Again Not sure how it will work in the long run but as of now my theory seems to be correct everytime I have gone in it has been warm and humid. I think I will soon move a few plants inside to see if it will work out and if they die oh well I will chalk it up to trial and error. might as well harness that extra heat instead of letting it go wasted.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by mudbuddy View Post
          I don't heat the GH, I heat the soil boxes with heat tape in the bottom, Plant deep & cover at night.
          The warm soil keep them warm at night.
          GH 8 X 12, 2X4s ,Barn style & tie downs to hold up in wind
          Mudbuddy
          did you design and build your GH or did you buy a kit from someplace...?? I see Lowes and Home Dep have some flimsy little things that would work as long as there was never any winds... but here in the beautiful Mat-Su Valley I envision a few of those floating away the next good blow... I know buying the materials and building it myself is going to be a little more expensive up front, but probably last much longer... I been dinking around for 37 yrs trying to grow tomatoes outside, I think it's time I got serious and built a little GH.../John

          Comment


          • #6
            I had a fancy "Charlies GH" with the double wall GH sheet stuff, nice white aluminum, beautiful.
            http://www.charleysgreenhouse.com/SC...Eave-White.htm
            Early 90s winter, we had some 100 mph winds, Good By Charley. & lots of money
            So I built one for my location & strapped it down, going on 8 or 9 hears now.
            Made my own barn style to handle wind better , with 2 X 4 & Sun Tuff.
            Built one for a buddy in Willow, more snow load, less wind: 2 - 2X6s for the ridge pole & steep roof.
            No plans, just built a 2ft high 8X12 bottom wall (4 pcs) , 5ft wall on top of it, on 24" centers, door frame on front wall.
            Add trusses, cover with Sun Tuff, install door, luvers & fan
            He put his on a 4X6 base. then I made 3 - 16" X 16" X 16" soil boxes to fit inside.
            Total: a little more than $1k, Suntuff & fan kits most of the money.
            Some cheaper stuff out there to cover it with, but Suntuff is UV resistant. Box fan hung on a screened in frame. works if you are going to be home. (better too cool than too hot.)
            Neighbor has a frame, covers it with new clear 6 mil roll plastic every year, plugs in a fan with the homemade door open, works. Get nice tomatoes.
            Attached Files

            Comment


            • #7
              Nice greenhouse mudbuddy....The one that is on my property was here when we bought 4 years ago. Not sure how long it has been here. It was actually built on with a cinderblock foundation. Should hold up for a long time. I do need to replace one of the GH panels on the roof this year though. Some 60+ MPH winds that came thru last summer while I was gone ripped one off...Only problem, I'm not that fond of hieghts...HMMM what a pickle I'm in since my husband should be deployed before it's time to fix it. think I can send one of the kids up there? haha

              Anyone have a heated greenhouse that can be started up around Jan/Feb here in the interior?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by mudbuddy View Post
                I had a fancy "Charlies GH" with the double wall GH sheet stuff, nice white aluminum, beautiful.
                http://www.charleysgreenhouse.com/SC...Eave-White.htm
                Early 90s winter, we had some 100 mph winds, Good By Charley. & lots of money
                So I built one for my location & strapped it down, going on 8 or 9 hears now.
                Made my own barn style to handle wind better , with 2 X 4 & Sun Tuff.
                Built one for a buddy in Willow, more snow load, less wind: 2 - 2X6s for the ridge pole & steep roof.
                No plans, just built a 2ft high 8X12 bottom wall (4 pcs) , 5ft wall on top of it, on 24" centers, door frame on front wall.
                Add trusses, cover with Sun Tuff, install door, luvers & fan
                He put his on a 4X6 base. then I made 3 - 16" X 16" X 16" soil boxes to fit inside.
                Total: a little more than $1k, Suntuff & fan kits most of the money.
                Some cheaper stuff out there to cover it with, but Suntuff is UV resistant. Box fan hung on a screened in frame. works if you are going to be home. (better too cool than too hot.)
                Neighbor has a frame, covers it with new clear 6 mil roll plastic every year, plugs in a fan with the homemade door open, works. Get nice tomatoes.
                That is a very good looking green house... both of them are IMHO... here in the beautiful Mat Valley, I will have to worry more about wind than snow.. I been thinking of pouring a pad to have something to bolt a GH down to.. If it would just stop snowing I could start getting ready.../John

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Old John View Post
                  That is a very good looking green house... both of them are IMHO... here in the beautiful Mat Valley, I will have to worry more about wind than snow.. I been thinking of pouring a pad to have something to bolt a GH down to.. If it would just stop snowing I could start getting ready.../John
                  Think about pouring a ring beam instead of a pad. Then you still have a solid foundation for whatever you build, but you still have access to the soil.
                  You hear about hothouse tomatoes that don't taste as good as ones from outdoors. The biggest reason for this is many people grow their plants in a greenhouse in a potting mix and not their own soil. The soil can provide more trace elements, especially when it has been amended with compost, than any bagged soil mix. Trace elements are important to the plant's health, the fruit's flavor, and your health.
                  It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

                  http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Garnede
                    I'm an old Sailor not too knowledgeable when it comes to terms such as "ring beam".. You'll have to explain that one..
                    I have to import all the soil for lawn/garden here... we are setting on some tightly compacted glacier silt, gravel and clay.. wouldn't even grow good weeds... So I've had to buy a couple truck loads of "topsoil" and add a lot of compost/manure to even get a decent crop of chickweed.. The 5 gal planters I plan to use for the tomatoes are full of a mixture of "topsoil" and compost.. and have grown decent plants, just haven't produced much in the way of fruit (yet).../John

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Toms looked great this morning. So far so good.

                      Using soil boxes does not mean you don't have soil with trace elements for the plants.
                      Pretty easy to mix in some local soil. But with an continuos use of the soil, it will run out of nutrients
                      if it is not maintained. I take out the top 4 inches, add & mix garden compost & perlite in.
                      Give it a shot of beer & corn syrup (1 beer(ale better yet), 1 cup syrup, 1 can of coke, in a 5 gallon bucket of warm water) a week before planting & cover it. Helps activate the soil microbes. Feeds the soil.
                      Having above ground soil boxes here is almost a must for early planting, but I've found "early" to mean different thing to different people, "early" to me for my GH is by April 15th. Some heated GHs can plant in March.
                      I found "temperature at night" to also effect the taste of tomatoes greatly, But Georgia don't have the same climate as we do here in Alaska. A warm night for us is 50+(typical is some where in the 40s), even if it is only for a few hours. Our few"hot" days in the 70s is colder than Georgia's normal summer nights.
                      The rule of thumb "Never refrigerate a tomato" is tough here. So the plant & fruit sugar production process is different here.

                      Comment

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