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  • #76
    Be sure to plant your tomatoes deep when you move them into a bigger pot or outside. If the plant is leggy, just remove the lower leaves and dig a trench to bury the stem in. It has been proven that tomatoes will fruit up to 2 weeks earlier and larger fruit if planted this way. If you succeed in getting thick short stems then plant them up to the first set of true leaves. Anything that you bury will sprout roots and feed the plant.

    I'll be making a garden update on my blog tomorrow.

    Originally posted by AKHuntressNP View Post
    Hi COtoAK...glad to see your stuff is off to a great start. I'm trying to get my tomatoes to grow a little slower this year as they were huge by the time I put them outside. (big as in needed to stake them up already) So, I put them where it is a little cooler in my house which seems to be working. I'm trying to get them to stay a bit shorter but with bigger stems at the bottom. Well, see how all that works.

    I also seemed to go a little overboard on my 4 varieties of tomatoes. I have tomato starts coming out my you know what. Didn't realize how many I had started until it was time to transplant into bigger pots. Now I'm out of room to put other seed starts that will start here shortly. I already have 2 small grow lights and one big flourescent light fixture on the tomatoes, peppers and melons.
    It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

    http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

    Comment


    • #77
      Originally posted by garnede View Post
      Be sure to plant your tomatoes deep when you move them into a bigger pot or outside. If the plant is leggy, just remove the lower leaves and dig a trench to bury the stem in. It has been proven that tomatoes will fruit up to 2 weeks earlier and larger fruit if planted this way. If you succeed in getting thick short stems then plant them up to the first set of true leaves. Anything that you bury will sprout roots and feed the plant.

      I'll be making a garden update on my blog tomorrow.

      Thanks for the advice garnede. When I transplanted, I planted up to the first set of leaves on most of them. the ones that seem leggy at greenhouse time, get planted deep so they grow the extra roots. You are right, they do a lot better job growing and fruiting when planting this way.

      Comment


      • #78
        My garden moved beyond starting this week. I had my first harvest of strawberries this morning. You can see pictures on my blog in my signature line.

        For the person who has left mean and abusive comments, no I am not in Alaska but I lived there for 5 years and I love it. I still feel like I am part of the family, and I still have family there. I enjoy talking about my garden like most gardeners, but the Georgia forums talk about deer food plots and roundup ready corn, not organic and heirloom gardening.
        It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

        http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #79
          Planted my first round of seeds Monday and Tuesday and am now just waiting for the first sprouts to arrive. Thus far we've got broccoli, cauliflower, leaf lettuce, kale, bok choi, swiss chard, and zucchini going. We also bought two varieties of carrots and some spinach, but will wait to put those seeds directly in the ground.

          Comment


          • #80
            My wife and daughter planted a batch of seeds today in planters similar to what bsj425. We have brussel sprouts, 2 different varieties of broccoli, cauliflower, summer squash, and zuchinni. We'll do some lettuce after awhile as well. Our plan is to let Dimond Greenhouse or Bell's nursery get our tomato plants coming along and we'll buy them once it gets closer to the time for putting them out. We got a greenhouse this past week at Sam's. It is a 10x10 metal frame with a heavy plastic covering. I may build a more permanent one as well, but we figured this would get us started in learning what to do.
            Never count your days, but rather, make all of your days count.

            Comment


            • #81
              What I have growing right now:

              8 varieties of heirloom tomatoes
              spinach
              New Zealand Spinach (likes the heat)
              red onions
              white onions
              garlic
              leeks
              kale
              beets
              radishes
              kalrobi
              amarillo carrots
              parsnips
              collards
              lettuce
              rainbow chard
              sweet corn
              field corn
              Asparagus
              Artichoke
              oregon sugar pod peas
              alaska snow peas
              wax beans
              bush green beans
              pinkeye purple hull peas
              Asparagus stringless green bean, pole beans with 18-24" beans
              pumpkins
              water mellon
              jelly mellon
              banana mellon
              a french musk mellon
              gourds several varieties
              japanese serpent mellon
              winter squash
              2 varieties of plumb trees
              quince
              japanese red mustard
              lettuce
              mesclun
              peaches
              huckleberry
              3 varieties of grapes
              squash
              zucchini
              chives
              elephant garlic
              Strawberries
              carrots (orange and yellow)
              Wild flowers
              Amaranth
              Sorghum (dwarf)
              parsley
              cilantro
              lemon balm
              spicy bush globe basil
              genovese basil
              lemon basil
              rosemary
              dill
              ginger
              sweet potatoes
              Serano Peppers
              Sweet peppers
              Cayenne Peppers
              Apple trees
              Cabbage
              Broccoli
              Radishes
              Beets
              lemon grass
              6 types of potatoes
              sage
              thyme
              sweet potatoes
              raspberry's
              blackberry's
              And several others
              It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

              http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

              Comment


              • #82
                Originally posted by garnede View Post
                What I have growing right now:

                8 varieties of heirloom tomatoes
                spinach
                New Zealand Spinach (likes the heat)
                red onions
                white onions
                garlic
                leeks
                kale
                beets
                radishes
                kalrobi
                amarillo carrots
                parsnips
                collards
                lettuce
                rainbow chard
                sweet corn
                field corn
                Asparagus
                Artichoke
                oregon sugar pod peas
                alaska snow peas
                wax beans
                bush green beans
                pinkeye purple hull peas
                Asparagus stringless green bean, pole beans with 18-24" beans
                pumpkins
                water mellon
                jelly mellon
                banana mellon
                a french musk mellon
                gourds several varieties
                japanese serpent mellon
                winter squash
                2 varieties of plumb trees
                quince
                japanese red mustard
                lettuce
                mesclun
                peaches
                huckleberry
                3 varieties of grapes
                squash
                zucchini
                chives
                elephant garlic
                Strawberries
                carrots (orange and yellow)
                Wild flowers
                Amaranth
                Sorghum (dwarf)
                parsley
                cilantro
                lemon balm
                spicy bush globe basil
                genovese basil
                lemon basil
                rosemary
                dill
                ginger
                sweet potatoes
                Serano Peppers
                Sweet peppers
                Cayenne Peppers
                Apple trees
                Cabbage
                Broccoli
                Radishes
                Beets
                lemon grass
                6 types of potatoes
                sage
                thyme
                sweet potatoes
                raspberry's
                blackberry's
                And several others

                This is the gardening forum, and most of us are trying to grow a garden. THAT is not a garden, that's a farm. :topjob:
                Never count your days, but rather, make all of your days count.

                Comment


                • #83
                  It is really an exercise in efficiency. I have 4' rows separated by 2' walkways. Then I don't waste space between each vegie to have a walkway. I only have 900-1000 sq ft dedicated to garden, including the foundation plantings and mulched areas around trees. I have stacked some plantings too. I have lettuce and basil under my tomatoes. Beans planted in the corn, to give it a "pole" to climb on. Then in my flower beds, foundation plantings, and mulched areas around trees I have added sweet potatoes, cumin, cilantro. artichoke bushes, blueberry, kale, radish, beet, swiss chard, onions, garlic, and dill. I replaced some ornamental trees with plumb and huckleberry, and after I root them some fig too.
                  It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

                  http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Originally posted by garnede View Post
                    It is really an exercise in efficiency. I have 4' rows separated by 2' walkways. Then I don't waste space between each vegie to have a walkway. I only have 900-1000 sq ft dedicated to garden, including the foundation plantings and mulched areas around trees. I have stacked some plantings too. I have lettuce and basil under my tomatoes. Beans planted in the corn, to give it a "pole" to climb on. Then in my flower beds, foundation plantings, and mulched areas around trees I have added sweet potatoes, cumin, cilantro. artichoke bushes, blueberry, kale, radish, beet, swiss chard, onions, garlic, and dill. I replaced some ornamental trees with plumb and huckleberry, and after I root them some fig too.
                    boy thats the best idea i herd for a while, planting beans with corn so you get a free pole
                    Semper Fi!

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Planted a second round today in one of those little Jiffy greenhouse containers. This one had 72 different pellets to put into. We planted 2 different types of lettuce, 4 plants each. Four plants of spinach. A bunch of sugar snow peas, some regular peas, and a whole bunch of tomatoes. Really our first try at tomatoes up here in AK. We tried some Sweetie tomatoes, which are the small cherry tomatoes. Then we tried Siletz from Ed Hume seeds, and Early Tanana seeds from Denali Seeds. I think we have a total of 36 tomato plants. I don't think we'll turn all of those into full plants, but we wanted to get them going to see what they do. We'll see how it goes.
                      Never count your days, but rather, make all of your days count.

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        I harvested Mesclun mix, arugula, lettuce, strawberries, and radishes yesterday. I also have tomatoes blooming!
                        It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

                        http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Newbie Question....

                          Would anybody care to give their 2 cents worth on which plant starts would survive if I planted them today or next week?:question: (I live just outside of Palmer.)

                          I have 6 tomato plants, 2 green peppers, & some assorted herbs.

                          I also have a bunch of seeds to stick in the ground. Peas, beans, carrots, radishes, nasturtiums, & sunflowers.

                          I've gardened all my life, just not here in Alaska! ((Wanting to learn, as now it's my HOME!!! :w00t)

                          Thanks for listening!
                          Sincerely,
                          Kim

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Originally posted by MommaF8 View Post
                            Would anybody care to give their 2 cents worth on which plant starts would survive if I planted them today or next week?:question: (I live just outside of Palmer.)

                            I have 6 tomato plants, 2 green peppers, & some assorted herbs.

                            I also have a bunch of seeds to stick in the ground. Peas, beans, carrots, radishes, nasturtiums, & sunflowers.

                            I've gardened all my life, just not here in Alaska! ((Wanting to learn, as now it's my HOME!!! :w00t)

                            Thanks for listening!
                            Sincerely,
                            Kim
                            Peas, carrots, onions, and maybe the beans depending on the variety should do fine. The peppers and tomatoes need weather warmer than 40 at night to survive and 60 at night to fruit. Plant them near a brick or block wall on the south side of your house or near an rock outcropping. The rock/masonry will hold the day's heat and help the heat loving plants thrive in cool conditions without a greenhouse, but having one of those would help.
                            It ain't about the # of pounds of meat we bring back, nor about how much we spent to go do it. Its about seeing what no one else sees.

                            http://wouldieatitagainfoodblog.blogspot.com/

                            Comment

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