Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Help!! Ornery rooster...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Help!! Ornery rooster...

    I figured gardening is probably best for this topic?

    We have a hen house full of great layers, even during the coldest months the girls have been giving an abundance of eggs.
    Unfortunately our one and only rooster has gotten very ornery lately. He does a great job of watching over his hens, but he has gotten increasingly more aggressive to us.

    The birds were free ranging in the yard today when he flared up and came toward me aggressively and I had to kick him three times, the last time he really launched. I hated to do it, but sheesh, he's outta control.
    I'm running out of patience with him. He did run off and sulk after that last drop kick (my boot flew off!) Maybe he got the message?

    Am I wasting my time? Is there hope for an angry rooster? He was a good boy just a few months ago.

    Hate to release him into the deep fryer....:eek:
    Proud to be an American!

  • #2
    YEP

    Can you say chicken & dumplings ? Thats what he's gonna need to be; a flogging rooster doesn't change his ways. Unless your a cockfighter I'ld replace him with a friendlier bird.

    Comment


    • #3
      my solution

      Coq au Vin Recipe

      Ingredients

      1/2 lb bacon slices
      20 pearl onions, peeled, or 1 large yellow onion, sliced
      1 rooster, 4 lb, cut into serving pieces, excess fat trimmed, skin ON
      6 garlic cloves, peeled
      Salt and pepper to taste
      2 cups chicken stock
      2 cups red wine (pinot noir, burgundy, or zinfandel)
      2 bay leaves
      Several fresh thyme sprigs
      Several fresh parsley sprigs
      1/2 lb button mushrooms, trimmed and roughly chopped
      2 Tbsp butter
      Chopped fresh parsley for garnish

      Method

      1 Blanch the bacon to remove some of its saltiness. Drop the bacon into a saucepan of cold water, covered by a couple of inches. Bring to a boil, simmer for 5 minutes, drain. Rinse in cold water, pat dry with paper towels. Cut the bacon into 1 inch by 1/4 inch pieces.
      2 Brown bacon on medium high heat in a dutch oven big enough to hold the chicken, about 10 minutes. Remove the cooked bacon, set aside. Keep the bacon fat in the pan. Add onions and chicken, skin side down. Brown the rooster well, on all sides, about 10 minutes. Halfway through the browning, add the garlic and sprinkle the chicken with salt and pepper. (Note: it is best to add salt while cooking, not just at the very end. It brings out the flavor of the chicken.)
      3 Spoon off any excess fat. Add the chicken stock, wine, and herbs. Add back the bacon. Lower heat to a simmer. Cover and cook for 20 minutes, or until chicken is tender and cooked through. Remove chicken and onions to a separate platter. Remove the bay leaves, herb sprigs, garlic, and discard.
      4 Add mushrooms to the remaining liquid and turn the heat to high. Boil quickly and reduce the liquid by three fourths until it becomes thick and saucy. Lower the heat, stir in the butter. Return the chicken and onions to the pan to reheat and coat with sauce. Adjust seasoning. Garnish with parsley and serve.
      Serves 4. Serve with potatoes or over egg noodles.






      We kept chickens when I was growing up, and I can't see you having any luck with rooster behavior modification.


      Matt Drayton, Chef de Cuisine
      Captain Steve's Fishing Lodge
      www.captainstevesfishinglodge.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks, guys.

        My rooster says, @#$@#!! to you both, lol!
        Proud to be an American!

        Comment


        • #5
          Fullkurl I hear your frustration. I have a couple youngens who wouldn't forgive me for butchering our rooster... I have seen roosters do this before, and chances are they'll stop if you kick em. I tried it many times with an Americanus rooster that turned 2 y.o. He attacked my wife, kids, and even the lab! Finally he spurred me upside my head while feeding the ladies, and that was the last straw! I kicked him twice, and he pouted for a couple days only to attack again and again... We went around a couple times and I had enough.... He just turned downright mean and I finally explained to the kids that he was "not living with us anymore." His less dominate and docile brother took over the flock without incident, and lifes much easier! That angry rooster also crowed an aweful lot prior to his dismissal, making life rough as a shift worker.
          I have seen a kick in the butt work well! However, sometimes those birds can be pigheaded and won't correct their behavior. Just make sure everyone who interacts with that bird knows to give it a kick if it attacks... Otherwise he'll gain confidence and his fear of humans will be lost. Sounds cruel to bunny huggers, but it's the only way...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by barleydog View Post
            Fullkurl I hear your frustration. I have a couple youngens who wouldn't forgive me for butchering our rooster... I have seen roosters do this before, and chances are they'll stop if you kick em. I tried it many times with an Americanus rooster that turned 2 y.o. He attacked my wife, kids, and even the lab! Finally he spurred me upside my head while feeding the ladies, and that was the last straw! I kicked him twice, and he pouted for a couple days only to attack again and again... We went around a couple times and I had enough.... He just turned downright mean and I finally explained to the kids that he was "not living with us anymore." His less dominate and docile brother took over the flock without incident, and lifes much easier! That angry rooster also crowed an aweful lot prior to his dismissal, making life rough as a shift worker.
            I have seen a kick in the butt work well! However, sometimes those birds can be pigheaded and won't correct their behavior. Just make sure everyone who interacts with that bird knows to give it a kick if it attacks... Otherwise he'll gain confidence and his fear of humans will be lost. Sounds cruel to bunny huggers, but it's the only way...
            Thanks for posting, Barley.
            I went out last night to gather eggs and throw down some spinach scraps and the ole boy and I threw down near the coop door. He's never hurt anyone, but last night he spurred my left leg--and it hurt. It happened very fast.
            I then went into the house, grabbed the .22, and put him down.
            Just two months ago he was very docile and his spurs were dull. He had no interest in meaness at all.

            Recently he had become unbearable with his endless crowing, just like yours. I suppose it was a precursor to what he became--very dominant and territorial.
            After shooting and then picking him up I saw why my leg hurt so bad, those same dull spurs had become knife sharp.
            I can see why people say that roosters can take an eye out, especially with small kids. They are nothing to fool around with.

            We'll get another friendlier fella.
            Proud to be an American!

            Comment


            • #7
              Was he too tough for dumplins?
              Vegetables arenít food, vegetables are what food eats.

              Comment


              • #8
                Chicken noodle soup for this guy.
                Proud to be an American!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Roster

                  We ONCE had a roster that would stock my wife around the coop. He ended up as chicken an dumplings. Was good! We make every attempt to get only hens now but every once in a while....
                  Sorry that you got spurred, but good that it was not a child.

                  Comment

                  Footer Adsense

                  Collapse
                  Working...
                  X