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Corner posts for moose fence

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  • Corner posts for moose fence

    I'm enclosing my garden and trees this year. I plan on doing 4x4 PT post on the corners and T posts in between. I figure well anchored 4x4 will let me have a nice and tight fence, I'm using Tenax Deer control fencing. I ordered some of that stuff last year and I'm very happy with it.

    I'm right inbetween Palmer and Wasilla. How deep should I put my corner posts? What I have seen is that accounting for frost line is 60 inches but this sounds a bit excessive, considering that this is not for a foundation and will not be holding weight. For those who have put fences down, how deep did you go and how did that work out for you?

  • #2
    You should be fine with four feet in the ground.





    Michael Strahan
    Site Owner
    Alaska Hunt Consultant
    1 (406) 662-1791

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    • #3
      We used pressure-treated 4x4 posts (10') a LONG time ago, many years, but ran railings off of the posts with 2x4 at 4' height (using 2x4 blocks to support the railings at the 4' height), and across the tops at 7' height, with 3' of the posts in the ground. We knee-braced the 4' railing and the 7' railing to either side of each opening, with about 6' between posts, and ran welded wire (2'x4' mesh) top to bottom, using outdoor electrical staples to hold the wire to the wood.

      Still there, and never had to install the electric fencing to the outside, as the moose quit eating my broccoli YEARS ago.

      Good luck.

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      • #4
        I take it with that much post on the ground that I could just back fill it with gravel? My soil is the usual valley sand/river rocks. I still have a pile of clean gravel from regrading my driveway.

        Not that this is happening anytime soon. I just tried to remove the mulch from one of my trees to mix in some compost, both the compost and the mulch were frozen solid a few inches under the surface.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by dbcooper View Post
          I take it with that much post on the ground that I could just back fill it with gravel? My soil is the usual valley sand/river rocks. I still have a pile of clean gravel from regrading my driveway.

          Not that this is happening anytime soon. I just tried to remove the mulch from one of my trees to mix in some compost, both the compost and the mulch were frozen solid a few inches under the surface.
          We used standard post hole diggers, made the hole notable wider than needed, to the 3' depth/mark, then used our local soil (silt, silt, and more.... silt) to repack the hole around the post, holding a level to alternating sides of the post as we put a bit of fill in, then tamped it down with a hardwood shovel handle, then a bit more fill, then more tamping, until the thing was done. That way, by stopping at each X amount of fill, and compacting the fill with the handle as well as could be expected, it was more firm, with less movement when finished. Add a touch of extra at the top, as it may still settle a bit with rain, etc.. Which is also helped by the knee-bracing we did to the railings at the 4' and 7' levels..

          Once all tied in, even just with the silt back-fill, it's pretty stout.

          USE GROUND CONTACT PRESSURE_TREATED POSTS, NOT DECK WOOD POSTS. The railings can be deck wood, but the posts MUST/SHOULD be ground-contact. Mine weren't, and they're till there, but I'm getting too old to redo them, and these days I try to make sure I only do a job once..

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          • #6
            I'm slowly replacing sections of fence that were put in over 30 years ago. The original fenceposts were 4x4 ten feet long, put in holes about 3' deep. They originally used concrete but I am just filling with crushed gravel. I like the crushed because it locks things in immediately.

            I have witnessed an adult moose jumping over a 5' fence from a dead still standing position. I couldn't tell you how tall is tall enough but I would go as high as you possibly can.

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