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  • #16
    Originally posted by msta999 View Post
    I did put an outlet in, figured one plug for a heated waterer and one for a heat lamp......now I'm thinking I should install a light switch for a light......
    If you're going to keep chickens year-round you'll want to put the light on a timer; photoperiod is the physiological driver for egg laying, and also contributes to general health/wellbeing. No need for a heat lamp; if your coop is well insulated a 100 watt, or smaller bulb is sufficient for heat. They can tolerate below freezing temps in winter, but don't fare well with long periods of sub-zero. Note: DO NOT use a "rough service" bulb in your coop! They have a coating on them the offgassing of which is extremely toxic to birds.

    Originally posted by msta999 View Post
    I built nests, which hang on the outside of the coop, I plan on insulating them with 1 inch Styrofoam.
    Your chickens aren't going to want to use nest boxes outside in the winter. They'll venture outside some in winter, but they're not keen on snow, and they don't do sub-zero. Feet and combs are prone to frostbite. Even in summer they will probably be happier with them inside. Also: do not leave any styrofoam insulation exposed anywhere. They will eat it.

    Originally posted by msta999 View Post
    I'm almost done with my coop, I have to insulate it and put in some kind of paneling on the inside to cover the insulation. any recommendations for paneling on the inside, that isn't too pricey? I couldn't believe how much siding was! it has gone way up! and when I put insulation in the floor joists, when should I use to cover the bottom? I am also planning on putting in some kind of laminated flooring, to cover the particle board and make it easier to clean out.
    Plywood is probably best all-round material for interior surfaces. 1/4" is sufficient for walls and ceiling; heavier for floor, depending on what's supporting it. Insulate the heck out of the coop if you intend to keep birds through the winter. Make it tight; a weasel can get through a hole the size of a dime, and kill your whole flock in a few minutes overnight. I'm afraid you'll find particle board won't last long. Plywood will serve you better.

    You'll want to be able to close their yard door at night and during cold periods in winter. And you'll want an access door you can use without letting your flock escape around your feet when you're coming/going. A crotch height sill wall that you step over works fairly well.
    Last edited by iofthetaiga; 05-17-2021, 09:19.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It

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    • #17
      Originally posted by msta999 View Post

      Is this the hanging type? I see several types on Amazon, I'll stop by the local feed store and see what they have.
      yes, hanging. I got the one on Amazon that plugs in and has the nipples on the sides, not the bottom.

      Farm Innovators HB-60P Heated 2 Gallon Poultry Drinker



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      • #18
        What do you use to cover the bottom of the insulation under the coop floor boards (bottom of the coop)? I have some left over 1/4 inch birch sheets that I am thinking of using and sit the whole thing on a couple rail road ties.
        I plan on putting a window in the door, but do I need to worry about some kind of ventilation?

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        • #19
          Originally posted by msta999 View Post
          I plan on putting a window in the door, but do I need to worry about some kind of ventilation?
          Ventilation in the summer isn't difficult. We replace our man-door with a chicken wire door, so ventilation is essentially unlimited.

          Ventilation in winter is a sticky wicket. Chickens like to be dry. Wet/humid conditions beget disease/health issues, and a closed up coop in winter can become a humid mess. But to sufficiently ventilate a coop in winter requires the application of a lot of BTU's that most of us can't afford. It's a balancing act for which I don't have a good answer.
          ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
          I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
          The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It

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          • #20
            You need 3-4 square feet of space per chicken in the chicken coop and approximately 10 square feet per chicken in the chicken run. My coop is 4 ft x 8 ft and I usually keep 10 chickens in it but that's pushing it space wise a little bit. My outside run varies in width because I used scrap materials to build it but is approximately 8 ft wide by 25 ft long. My run is covered with herring seine netting to keep out the Hawks and eagles.This winter I covered part of my run with a tarp and the chickens loved going outside so long as they don't have to stand in the snow. <br/>I have a light on there in the winter time on a timer to give them at least 14 hours of daylight every day. I have two nest boxes that are approximately 10 in by 12 in. I have seedling heat mats in the bottom to keep the eggs from freezing in the winter time and they are connected to a electrical block that turns on when it's below freezing out.<br/>I have a Premier One heated electric nipple water inside the coop in the winter time and a separate outside bucket nipple water to give them additional water in the summer. I give them all the feed they want to eat and I also give them grit and oyster shells on the side free choice in separate feeders that I made out of ABS pipe. Of course you don't want to give them oyster shells or layer mix until they're at the point of lay as too much calcium is not good for young chickens. I leave the door to their run open year round day and night and I've not had any problems doing that. I also have a couple small circular vents located at the highest point one on each side of the coop. My coop has a man door on the side for getting in and cleaning it out and a window in the front. I have a couple of 2x2s mounted inside for roosting bars. I think overall having owned a lot of different pets chickens are one of if not the easiest and my personal favorite to raise.<br/>And the fresh eggs are always nice to receive!
            "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

            "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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            • #21
              I just have OSB on the floor and was thinking i should put some kind of flooring down....

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              • #22
                Originally posted by msta999 View Post
                I just have OSB on the floor and was thinking i should put some kind of flooring down....
                If I had OSB on there that would absolutely be a must. That chicken waste is going to eat through that fairly quickly plus the OSB is going to break apart as you're scraping and cleaning every couple of weeks or so.
                Last edited by kasilofchrisn; 06-05-2021, 11:45.
                "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

                "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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                • #23
                  I bought some laminated flooring and put it down.

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                  • #24
                    Here is the inside of my chicken coop: Inside the Chicken Compound! (rumble.com)

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                    • #25
                      lost one chicken, it went under the gate to the back yard and my dog killed it! I worry that the dogs may get out and kill them all.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by msta999 View Post
                        lost one chicken, it went under the gate to the back yard and my dog killed it! I worry that the dogs may get out and kill them all.
                        Sorry to hear that!<br/>My buddy lost 40 chickens he incubated and raised up.Found his neighbor's dog in his chicken run.<br/>His neighbor came looking for his dog.<br/> My buddy gave him his collar back. His neighbor was positive his dog wouldn't do that even though the dog was caught red handed! <br/>I guess he's still mad years later for losing his dog. Though the dog had it coming.<br/>Lucky my buddy didn't sue the dogs owner for his lost birds!My sister lost a rooster to a stray dog but, the dog left bleeding all over his face as her rooster fought pretty hard to protect his flock! Dogs and chickens most often do not get along well.<br/>My new chicks are getting pretty big. Can't wait until they start laying and my egg production picks back up.<br/>Probably late September or early October for these girls.<br/>
                        Last edited by kasilofchrisn; 2 weeks ago.
                        "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

                        "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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                        • #27
                          Over the years we've had labs, husky mixes and terriers, and none of them could have cared less about our chickens, which we routinely let run loose during the day. I had one dog which was really interested in them when they were chicks....that incessant peeping from the cardboard box in the garage was awfully tempting to him...but after that he had no real interest in them. I think it's mostly a matter of training and familiarization.

                          A loose guinea pig or hamster in the living room on the other hand... No chance! lol.
                          ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
                          I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
                          The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It

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                          • #28
                            I started thinking about it and I can remember when I was a kid, we lived on a farm and my dad said, if your dog goes after the chickens, tie a dead chicken around his neck and leave it till it rots and falls off, then the dog won't bother the chickens again....anyone else ever heard that?

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by msta999 View Post
                              I started thinking about it and I can remember when I was a kid, we lived on a farm and my dad said, if your dog goes after the chickens, tie a dead chicken around his neck and leave it till it rots and falls off, then the dog won't bother the chickens again....anyone else ever heard that?
                              Yes, I've heard that as well. I think your own dogs can be taught to not bother your chickens. It's stray dogs that I think are of concern. Fortunately where I'm at strays are rare. But you never know.<br/>That's why my coop and run are dog/hawk/eagle proofed.<br/>Bears could also be concerning but are much harder to keep out if they are determined to get in.
                              Last edited by kasilofchrisn; 1 week ago.
                              "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

                              "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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                              • #30
                                whats crazy is we leave our plastic food bin with a cover on it right by the coop. We have had bears come through our yard multiple times and walk right by it and not even try to open it. We had a bird feeder on our deck and the bear went up the deck reached up to the gutter and grabbed the bird feeder but didnt take a second look at the 40 pounds of feed in the bin by the coop. Only thing that has ever got into the bin was a moose last winter that had its way with a bunch of cracked corn and feed. We also picked up 5 turkeys this spring and are going to be harvesting them this november. Those things grow so fast compared to the chickens.
                                I will never be a "Prostaffer" its not that I am not good enough
                                but its because I refuse to pimp products for free.

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