insulate floor?

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  • Mr. Pid
    replied
    Moving outside air through your insulation toward the heat will make condensation, too. That's the likely scenario with your floor. Absolutely yes you should insulate. Since you're doing that you need to add a vapor barrier. Foil faced insulation installed with the foil facing up is a decent way of doing it easily. Adding a sheet vinyl floor on the top side helps, too. Critters will love your insulated floor if you don't take measures to keep them out.

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  • rifleman
    replied
    Vapor barrier should be on the side of a wall, floor, or ceiling that places it as close to the heated living area as possible. This means that when you are inside the cabin, the vapor barrier is the first thing beneath the subfloor, or behind the dry wall/panelling. For cabin floors, it's best to put vapor barrier down on top of the floor joists before installing the sub-floor.

    The idea is that the living space is where moisture accumulates from cooking, breathing, bathing, etc. If there were no vapor barrier, the moisture in the air (water in a gaseous state) would migrate outward through the walls, floor, and ceiling. Eventually, as it moves outward through the insulation, it will cool until its temperature reaches the dew point. At the dew point, you would get water condensing in the insulation, or if the dew point were below freezing, you would get frost formation in the insulation. The vapor barrier prevents this migration of the humid interior air.

    Fortunately, winter air in south central and interior Alaska is usually very dry to begin with. This means the air in a cabin will start out very dry and become only moderately humid while you stay there. So, in a cabin without vapor barrier, there may be little or no problem depending on the habits of the occupants. If you were to install a high capacity camp shower, and take a lot of long hot showers, your insulation with no vapor barrier protection could end up dripping wet!

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  • AKFishOn
    replied
    I would use a vapor barrier if you are in a wet area. I did not where my cabin is (not to wet). I also later skirted the cabin as that is what State Farm wanted me to do in order to insure it.

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  • Malamute
    replied
    You should have a vapor barrier above the insulation, but I didnt and it hasnt been a problem so far. It's very dry here tho.

    I also insulated full depth of my floor joists with fibreglass batts, then covered over from the bottom with OSB. I just nailed it on.

    It made a huge difference in my place also. Didn't have the bottom skirted, and the dog water froze in the bowl in the house in some 20 below weather. I thought the floors felt a bit cold,....

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  • Dirtofak
    replied
    I used 12" JCIs on 12 in centers. R34 fiberglass between them, then put 2"blueboard on the ledge. The whole bottom is sheeted with OSB using sheetrock screws. It made a HUGE difference.

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  • akriverunner
    started a topic insulate floor?

    insulate floor?

    I am using BCI's floor joists and wondering how I should go about insulating the floor. I was thinking of ripping osb to lay between the joints then use fiberglass bats but should I vapor barrier before the subfloor?

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