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Dreams Do Come True

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  • Dreams Do Come True

    Finally-after searching for almost a year, we have found the perfect piece of property to call our own.

    5-Acres near Talkeetna on a creek, and 500-feet above the sea level.
    Perfect place for solar panels and a wind generator.

    Plenty of game in the area from what I could see of the tracks going through the property.

    There isnt anyone within 1.5 miles, and its off-grid with road access all year round. There's a small 14x14 cabin on the property. it has a dirt floor and hasn't been used for several years. Not sure if i will rehab it, or use it as a storage shed.

    Already we have the power system ready to go, the tools and things that we will need once we start living there full-time.

    Lots of work to get done over the next few years.

    Build s small cabin, perhaps a shipping container house. Put in a well and septic system, and get some fruit bearing bushes planted.

    Lot's of work and sweat.

    Any advice from you "Done That Been There" guys.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Way to go

    Congratulations!

    Small creeks and springs can produce HUGE areas of overflow ice (glaciering) engulfing anything it's path - stay away! This time of year would be perfect to evaluate what goes on during the winter with that scenario.

    You can never have enough storage, both dry and secured (lockable), build accordingly!

    Put pencil to graph paper laying out your cabin design. You might find you need a little bigger place when you start asking yourself where will I put my this, that, and all my crap!

    Oh, and measure twice and cut once!

    Cheers

    Comment


    • #3
      Yer Right..

      We walked in there a couple of weeks ago. The road maintenance ends about s1.5 miles from the cabin, and the snow pack was pretty deep.

      It's gonna take us about 5 years to get the $moola$ saved up to pay for the cabin. (provided that they dont get above $16k)

      The creek is frozen solid right now. But the previous owner sent pix from last summer, and its a raging torrent of swirling water.

      Fortunatley, the state installed a couple of steel culverts under the road, and that seems to keep the water flowing in the summer. I'm sure that the ice will surely clog the pipes.

      We just came back from Wasilla. Bough a used little 19' camper trailer for a decent price. It's gonna serve as our "hotel room" while we are up there clearing the land, and getting things squarred away.
      Attached Files

      Comment


      • #4
        Land

        If I may ask, how did you find this piece of property? I myself am looking for a similar type of property. Thanks

        Comment


        • #5
          Congratulations. Enjoy the journey. I look forward to following your progress on this forum.

          Comment


          • #6
            congrats!! on your property good feeling isnt it........
            Lance
            http://www.tcguideservice.com/index.html

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks

              yes-It IS a good feeling. This past week we have been on pins & needles waiting for the loan to get approved. Bankers sure do work at a snails pace, unless their owed money HEH HEH

              I got the listing of Craiglist. Searched there every day for a year.

              Originally posted by qkayak View Post
              Congratulations. Enjoy the journey. I look forward to following your progress on this forum.

              Comment


              • #8
                Saw mill

                If you have the time and are a little short on cash, a saw mill may be the way to go? I built my first cabin in the bush outside of Talkeetna 15 years ago with an Alaska Mill (chainsaw mill). I hauled the roofing, flooring, pilings, wood stove and siding in in the winter. I cut a ring around the spruce logs that I selected for building one winter, left the trees stand over the summer, and built the cabin the following summer. The logs were well seasoned and dry when I cut them up into lumber. My original intention was to build a log cabin, but I thought a conventional "stick built" cabin would be quicker. As it turned out, by the time I cut the logs up into dimensional lumber and built the cabin, I could have built a log cabin in the same amount of time or maybe even a little quicker. An Alaska Mill chainsaw mill is not a fast way to cut up lumber! I have since purchased a band saw mill and wish I would have purchased it years ago! If you look for a while you may find a good deal on a used mill? It is well worth the investment! Good Luck! and Enjoy!

                Ak farmer

                Comment


                • #9
                  Log cabins are nice...

                  But if he is within 1.5 miles, not to practical.Materials arn't that expensive to stick frame a one story place.The nice thing about stick frame is the insulation you can fit in the walls.When winter comes and you can heat with a match, you'll thank me for this advise.Remember, your using wood for heat maybe 8 months a year .I have fir trees for wood over 2' at the base across and over 100' tall.I'm very thankful I can heat 24/7s for 6 months on 2-2 1/2 cords.Cabin main floor is about 475 sq ft.GR

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Sounds like you have some nice building logs..
                    Lance
                    http://www.tcguideservice.com/index.html

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Building logs...

                      Lance, I have some great logs(11 acres of them)But after talking with a friend who has a log home, and his comments on his power bills last winter, I'd have to stay with my stick frame.I like log homes...to look at.I'm just old enough that if I have a preference of cutting 12 cords to heat a place...or 4-5 ...My body says go with the 4-5.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by akfarmer View Post
                        If you have the time and are a little short on cash, a saw mill may be the way to go? I built my first cabin in the bush outside of Talkeetna 15 years ago with an Alaska Mill (chainsaw mill). I hauled the roofing, flooring, pilings, wood stove and siding in in the winter. I cut a ring around the spruce logs that I selected for building one winter, left the trees stand over the summer, and built the cabin the following summer. The logs were well seasoned and dry when I cut them up into lumber. My original intention was to build a log cabin, but I thought a conventional "stick built" cabin would be quicker. As it turned out, by the time I cut the logs up into dimensional lumber and built the cabin, I could have built a log cabin in the same amount of time or maybe even a little quicker. An Alaska Mill chainsaw mill is not a fast way to cut up lumber! I have since purchased a band saw mill and wish I would have purchased it years ago! If you look for a while you may find a good deal on a used mill? It is well worth the investment! Good Luck! and Enjoy!

                        Ak farmer
                        Ak farmer,

                        I'm curious about your cutting a ring around your trees. How deep did you cut the ring..? Then you left them to stand and they dried out good..? Is that correct.? If so that sounds like a great idea...

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Ring the trees....

                          One thing to remember is the beetles look for weak trees.If you don't have spruce beetles on your land, this is a good way to attract them.GR

                          Comment

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