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Yurts????

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  • Yurts????

    The wife and I are still looking at some remote land in the Hatcher's pass area. We want somewhere to spend the summer months (May-Sept) and we like the idea of being able to take it down during the winter months so we wouldn't have to deal with vandalism. What's the pro's-con's of Yurts? Thanks in advance. Steve.

  • #2
    They are overpriced for the size of structure you get, they require much more heat than a permanent structure, and if you have one set up by a river it'll magnify the sound of the water.

    If you want temporary shelter, you can get a nice wall tent for maybe 1/10th the cost of a yurt. If you are going to spend as much as a yurt will cost, you can build a permanent structure.

    The only advantage I can see for a yurt is forest survice type cabins where the labor to have a crew errect a permanent structure in a remote location is high. Other then that, I can't think of any advantage of a yurt.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    • #3
      Thanks Paul. That's what I was kind of figuring out. It would probably be cheaper to build a small cabin than to purchase a yurt.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Paul H View Post
        They are overpriced for the size of structure you get, they require much more heat than a permanent structure, and if you have one set up by a river it'll magnify the sound of the water.

        If you want temporary shelter, you can get a nice wall tent for maybe 1/10th the cost of a yurt. If you are going to spend as much as a yurt will cost, you can build a permanent structure.

        The only advantage I can see for a yurt is forest survice type cabins where the labor to have a crew errect a permanent structure in a remote location is high. Other then that, I can't think of any advantage of a yurt.

        I agree, if you have to buy a yurt, you might as well build a permanent structure.

        However, I have two of them I use for hunt camps (1-3 weeks), a 16ft and a 22ft that I built myself and I am cheap and it was not expensive and it should end up costing about the same as a good wall tent. Mine is made of 1x2 sides, 2x2 roof, heavy duty plastic on the sides and blue tarps for the roof.

        I like them, they are a real novelty item, they are comfortable, very strong but not as efficent space wise as a square structure. But again if you have to buy one they are expensive.

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        • #5
          i would contact nomad shelters in homer the make them here in alaska seem like very nice people to deal with, i think they have a website not sure,

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          • #6
            The sad truth

            In todays world you always have to worry about vadalism.
            It's not as bad in Alaska as other places I've lived. Los Anchorage is pretty bad.

            Good luck and I would go with a nice wall tent.
            Good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment.

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            • #7
              Sorry I'm not adding any new info. I have been looking at building on my property and I have found that the Yurts are as much as some cabin kits. Although it may be fun to "live in the round" as yurt enthusiasts call it, building a small cabin would be more efficient. You may only want it for the summer now, but in Hatchers it may work as a winter get away too with all the snow. If nothing else maybe a weekend rental for sledheads. And if that is the case a winter insulated yurt could appeal to folks. Isn't it great to have choices?

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              • #8
                Also don't forget that in a Yurt which is round, the devil can't corner you.

                Sorry about that, I just could not resist.

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                • #9
                  And you can go crazy looking for a corner to pee in.
                  When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
                  '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"
                  2018 12' Moto Jet "River Pup"

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                  • #10
                    I lived in one for 4 years when I first moved up here. With the arctic insulation kit we stayed warm at 30-40 below with just a Toyo Type stove.
                    wall tent, cabin or yurt if someone wants to vandalize or break in they will.
                    I could here all the wildlife outside my yurt.
                    I used to love laying in bed watching the birds snatch up mosquitoes that were hovering above the yurts dome.
                    As for portability, my 20 foot yurt was taken down by just me. and is now stored inside my cabin.

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                    • #11
                      four legged vandals

                      Never had a yurt and don't think I will. While building our cabin, bears would get into and chew anything that was plastic while we were gone. Couldn't imagine leaving a big, expensive piece of plastic out there all by its lonesome. It would get mauled big time!

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