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  • #31
    Some things never change: https://www.historyplace.com/speeches/vest.htm

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    • #32
      Originally posted by beachbunny View Post
      god bless sunny sir.
      Yes, thank you. God bless Sunny as he has blessed us...
      Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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      • #33
        Originally posted by AK Troutbum View Post
        I’m just now reading this for the first time, and I’m so sorry for your loss. “Mans best friend” doesn’t really do justice to the relationships we share with our dogs. We’ve had chocolate labs now for almost 30 years, our current one will be 11 this November, and they are a special breed for sure. Again, I’m really sorry to hear of Sonny’s passing, stay well 4mer, and take care.<br/><br/><br/>Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
        Thank you my friend. And I agree, "man's best friend" doesn't quite cut it all the time. It just seems like some of them are so much more than that. When someone says "they are part of the family." now THAT conveys a bit more of the actual relationship that we have with them. We all have friends. Some we see and visit with daily, and some we don't see as often. But these animals live with you and are a part of your daily lives. They share in your happiness and sorrows, as they can always sense both. Many years ago I remember going through a tough time in my life. It was winter, I was alone, and a number of other "things" just weren't so good. Cheska my Chesapeake was sleeping against the wall across the room. I remember stoking the woodstove and starting to cry a little. Next thing I knew, Cheska was all up in my face nuzzling me. She picked up on my emotion and wanted to comfort me. They know when you're hurting as well as when you're happy and playful with them. One of the members of this forum has a young hunting dog that says he and the dog read each other's minds. I believe that. Some dogs are just exceptional animals for sure. Btw, If I don't end up with another chessy, I'm leaning toward a chocolate next time. I've always wanted one ever since I hunted over my uncle's chocolate/chessie mix. She was a phenomenal hunter and great fiend. Thanks again...
        Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Daveintheburbs View Post
          Indeed, mankind has quite a long and beautiful history with our canine friends.
          Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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          • #35
            my last one died in my arms from lyme disease at 6 yrs
            swore i would never get another.
            i got home after working the season,got to the top of the stairs, heard a wee yip and this little chocolate lab squirted through the door and all i could do was laugh and adore her.
            my kid picked her up the day after i left for camp,5 months earlier,
            sleeping right next to me now 4 years later,
            started hunting ducks again just for her,

            i really think it is the other dog reincarnated,she's his dog (but she likes me better!)

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            • #36
              Anyone who has ever owned a dog (or been owned by a dog) knows the sense of loss, regret and grief that a dog's death brings.
              I've had a lab (sometimes 2) since I was 21 and can recall the hurt that their loss meant, at the time and still does. They were all individuals with their own idiosyncrasies and foibles. They could be aggravating when they would feign "deafness", knowing that I knew better; then act like they were only kidding. 3 males and 4 females; 4 black, 2 chocolate and 1 yellow, Buck a black male currently lives with us. Some were great hunters and some were wonderful house dogs (that hunted a little).
              Dave - I understand your sense of loss and pain and nothing any of us say will do much to ease it. Unless knowing that there are others who feel and have felt the same loss and pain have (eventually) recovered.

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              • #37
                Thanks, got to get back on that horse.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by Daveintheburbs View Post
                  Thanks, got to get back on that horse.
                  Ha! ya beat me to it. I had forgotten you had checked in to this forum, and seeing that my name is Dave too I thought he was talking to me! I have mentioned my name on the forum a few times and thought maybe he had picked up on it at some time. Either way Gary, thanks for your input, and yes, we are a fraternity for sure. If you're a dog lover and have owned dogs for any length of time then you've experienced the loss. I guess the question is....at what magnitude? I've known some guys that either they are not that bothered by it much at all, or they hide it well. I guess there are just dog owners, and there are dog lovers. Personally I've cried over every dog I've lost since I was a kid, and I doubt that'll ever change. And yes Dave, it's time to "get back on that horse." In fact some people feel that the best way to fill that "hole" in your heart is by getting another dog right away. I'm sure we'll get another dog, but when? I don't know. I do know however that if I want to keep hunting birds, ducks especially, then I'll get another dog, as I love training dogs and hunting birds over them.
                  Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by 4merguide View Post

                    Ha! ya beat me to it. I had forgotten you had checked in to this forum, and seeing that my name is Dave too I thought he was talking to me! I have mentioned my name on the forum a few times and thought maybe he had picked up on it at some time. Either way Gary, thanks for your input, and yes, we are a fraternity for sure. If you're a dog lover and have owned dogs for any length of time then you've experienced the loss. I guess the question is....at what magnitude? I've known some guys that either they are not that bothered by it much at all, or they hide it well. I guess there are just dog owners, and there are dog lovers. Personally I've cried over every dog I've lost since I was a kid, and I doubt that'll ever change. And yes Dave, it's time to "get back on that horse." In fact some people feel that the best way to fill that "hole" in your heart is by getting another dog right away. I'm sure we'll get another dog, but when? I don't know. I do know however that if I want to keep hunting birds, ducks especially, then I'll get another dog, as I love training dogs and hunting birds over them.
                    I was talking to both of you. The absolute best way (IMO) to get over the loss is to have 2 dogs at the same time. I used to get a new pup when the resident dog was between 5-7 y/o, figuring the older dog still had 4-5 years (good years) of hunting left and when he/she breathed their last, the new dog would be ready to replace it in the field. That system worked pretty well for a number of years. The real benefit though was that after a death, you were still greeted at the door by a wagging tail; it greatly eased the period of grief after losing a best friend. I realize that this just isn't workable for many, but it worked great for me.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Gary View Post

                      I was talking to both of you. The absolute best way (IMO) to get over the loss is to have 2 dogs at the same time. I used to get a new pup when the resident dog was between 5-7 y/o, figuring the older dog still had 4-5 years (good years) of hunting left and when he/she breathed their last, the new dog would be ready to replace it in the field. That system worked pretty well for a number of years. The real benefit though was that after a death, you were still greeted at the door by a wagging tail; it greatly eased the period of grief after losing a best friend. I realize that this just isn't workable for many, but it worked great for me.
                      Thanks again Gary. My son and his wife live with us and they have a little dachshund. She's a little diva, pretty much believes she owns the house, and has personality coming out her ears! I have to say it's been a blessing to still have here around now. My daughter has a young border collie/aussie mix that is so smart it really is a joy to see. She brings her over quite often and shows us all the fancy little tricks she's taught her and we all adore her as well. I keep threatening my daughter that I'm gonna make a bird dog out of her! So anyway, it has been nice to still have these fun little critters around to help soften the blow....
                      Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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                      • #41
                        Back from the woods! Yeah I am a two dog kind of guy as well. Helps a lot, but I need to find a new second dog. Going with another lab after a break from them that just happened. Always good to have a spare dog! It is just too hard right after one goes. Thanks again for posting Dave.

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