Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

when to use salt

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by cowboyfan View Post
    I would like some opinions from taxidermists, I am going brown bear hunting next Sept. in Alaska with my 2 brothers. This will be unguided, we are being flown in and dropped off for 12 days it will be the first have of Sept. so not overly cold. None of us has experience skinning bears, would our best option be to learn to skin and turn everything then salt or is there other options? Of course we want to save the trophys forever and not have them messed up.
    okay, my opinion as a taxidermist, there will be others.... You should learn how to flesh, turn and salt before you go. You can youtube videos of how its done or go on Amazon and order a CD. If you are truly stuck for 12 days in warm weather you will have to salt it. If all three of you are hunting take a 50lb bag and you should be able to do three bears if you are careful with the salt. Put up a tarp to keep the rain off and build a rack to keep the hide off the ground and so air can circulate.

    That being said, you should ask your flight service if they will come get the hide early and freeze it(some do, some don't). If that's possible don't salt it and let them freeze it. Or is there someone on Kodiak who will salt and dry for you.(I know there is a guy on POW that does this, not sure about Kodiak).

    good luck.
    In Nature's Image Taxidermy and Game Calls
    Palmer

    Comment


    • #32
      He's going in sept so it won't be to Kodiak. But sept temps can be touch and go. I always bring salt. Cheap insurance!
      I'm not a taxidermist but I used to be a full time skinner/flesher/tanner for one. If that helps my opinion have any value...
      Www.blackriverhunting.com
      Master guide 212

      Comment


      • #33
        not a taxidermist but I can tell you that blow flies suck. I have no idea how bad or even if at all it will effect the hide , but its nasty either way to have a bunch of maggots crawling all over your hide. Take game bags big enough for your hide and get the hide in in quick. if you plan on any other animals you might hunt for meat take a bunch of bags. take the meat off the body and put it immediately into a bag. nasty little suckers will get it quick. good luck.

        Comment


        • #34
          Originally posted by cowboyfan View Post
          I would like some opinions from taxidermists, I am going brown bear hunting next Sept. in Alaska with my 2 brothers. This will be unguided, we are being flown in and dropped off for 12 days it will be the first have of Sept. so not overly cold. None of us has experience skinning bears, would our best option be to learn to skin and turn everything then salt or is there other options? Of course we want to save the trophys forever and not have them messed up.

          This is a pretty comprehensive video of a large Kodiak brown bear being prepped a number of years ago. Also, line up a taxidermist in advance to get specific preferences before going afield. http://www.alaskaangler.com/store/p6...7s_Bears_.html

          Comment


          • #35
            Thank you all for the recomendations, I just ordered that video. Defineltly dont want to screw up this hunt, thanks

            Comment


            • #36
              Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_2345.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	44.5 KB
ID:	2497876
              Can anybody tell me what went wrong here? I just got this tanned hide back yesterday and everything looks great except that the hair is missing on the back of the ears. I was a bit rushed when I picked it up and didn't notice until I got it home.

              I killed this brown bear just before dark on a cool night in late October. Had it in the truck about 11:00 pm and spread it out skin side up to cool on the way home where it stayed all night. I took the head out and turned the ears, split the lips, etc the next day in an unheated garage. It was my first time turning ears and splitting lips. I could not figure out how to flesh it so I didn't salt it but left it outside (dry) again that night.

              The next day I got it sealed and took it to get tanned. They said they would flesh and salt it and threw it on the floor with a huge pile of other hides.

              I'm wondering if I made a mistake turning the ears or if they left it too long before fleshing and salting it.

              Wishing I had HoytGuy do this one like my first bear which turned out perfect. I wanted to learn how to do the work though.

              Comment


              • #37
                Looking at the slipped ear skin I'd say they weren't turned all the way to the edge is 1/16" of a ince from the edge. Other possibility is heat transfer from your hands in the ears taking s considerable amount of time to turn them if it was your first time. Should be able to turn a bear ear in 1-2 min and flesh the ear itself of membrane and the ear butt of meat, fat and the thin cartilage that connects the muscle on the top and back of the ear. Look triangular shape and are 1/8" thick,

                to reiterate on the salt and not to salt DO NOT SALT YOUR BEAR IF IT ISNT FLESHED, turned, all red meat and excess fat removed, ears turned, lips and nose split and eye area FLESHED, and the upper and lower eye lid SPLIT.

                I took 7 bears in today, 4 brown and 3 blacks, all 3 blackbears were not turned, and properly fleshed. 1 bear was taken 6 days ago, feet and head in and 25 pounds of salt dumped on it, no part of that advice is good.
                If you salt the bear why put it in the freezer? It's not going to freeze, I don't get it. If your a taxidermist and your giving out advice to just load it with salt and all will be good, shoot me a pm and I'll send every bear that comes in like jerky your way.

                Hoytguy
                Quality Counts @ Dahlberg's Taxidermy

                Comment


                • #38
                  Hahah Jesse links jerky!!! Salted unfleshed bears are zero fun...there's no reason for that!
                  Www.blackriverhunting.com
                  Master guide 212

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by BRWNBR View Post
                    Hahah Jesse links jerky!!! Salted unfleshed bears are zero fun...there's no reason for that!

                    The bear you brought in was great, I gave your client a discount as the hard work was fine and done right the first time. Most of the bears brought in from guides or hunters who used a guide are the worst skin jobs, worst fleshing and piss poor field care prep in general. You are an exception, thanks
                    Quality Counts @ Dahlberg's Taxidermy

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Couple questions for the taxis. Say I have a hide I fleshed, turned everything and salted myself. I have it outside, but covered to keep the weather off. The rainy weather keeps the humidity high and it's taking a long time for the hide to actually get dry. How long can a hide sit salted, but moist?

                      Second question, would you rather receive a salted/dry hide, or a tanned hide to be mounted?

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Im only speaking for me. I don't want you to give me a tanned hide. Ive spent over 20 years in the business and have found a tannery that I like, provides a good product with good stretch and a quick turnaround. Ive used many many tanneries over the years and by trial and error found one that I think produces the best product. And depending on what you want to have mounted(rug, 1/2 mount, shoulder etc., I will either have the hide wet tanned or dry tanned.

                        I have of course received tanned hides from people trying to save a couple bucks by having it tanned themselves. Generally you can get them to come together, but I have had skins come in that were tanned in Africa that were unmountable.

                        As for your first question, If you mean while you are waiting for your hunt to end, you should be fine. As the humidity increases you will see some sweating on the hide/hair from the high salt content in the hide. It actually draws moisture in, but as the humidity drops, you will see it go away. If you mean how long can you store it once you get home, I advise keeping it in a cool, dry place until you can get it to your taxidermist. I would not leave a salted hide outdoors. I have had salted hides come in from Africa on many occasions that were over 1 year old.

                        Hugh
                        In Nature's Image Taxidermy and Game Calls
                        Palmer

                        Comment

                        Footer Adsense

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X