A Snare or Two For a Survival Kit, Post Your Ideas.

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by Anton74 View Post
    I myself would ditch the fishing gear and snares and get an ELB. If you go out on a snowmachine and die, it will be from Hypothermia, an avalanche, a crash, or drowning.
    The ELB is nice but you should always prepare in case it is broken/dead or the weather becomes too bad for rescue. Too many people die because they plan on either nothing going wrong or that someone will rescue them in a hurry.

    I've done search and rescue. It can be a needle in a haystack.

    Originally posted by Erik in AK View Post
    22 gauge (stainless) aircraft safety wire.

    A spool of 600 feet runs about $40. Invest in a pair of safetywire pliers (no idea on cost...$20ish?) Pull off 6 feet of wire, double it and twist it--8 to 10 twists per inch (this is where the pliers come in handy)

    The wire comes in handy and is a useful thing to carry.
    I agree on the wire. I always carry it, maybe not 600 feet, wire can be handy for a lot of things. Everything you plan on for survival should be a multi-tasker.

    I also always carry a small container of cooking oil too. High fat content will keep you warm and give you loads of calories.
    That's what she said...

    Comment


    • #32
      snares for survival

      I have been trapping for 8 years now and during that time I have put together a small survival kit that I always carry when I am trapping. As for snares, I usually carry one or two in my pocket in case I see a good place to set then while I am checking my 'line. I also have 3 that I carry in my survival kit. they are made out of braided picture hanger wire, and are about 5' long.
      I also carry,
      Vaseline and cotton balls to start a fire with
      matches
      Esbit stove and very small pot, with fuel bars for it
      10 to 12 bullion cubes
      A small Ziploc bag full of various nuts and raisins
      sewing kit with spectra fishing line
      signal mirror
      flint and steel
      heat factory body/hand/toe warmers
      first aid kit
      TP
      ganion line
      small hatchet
      folding knife
      sheath knife
      leatherman multi tool
      16 gauge tie wire
      and 2 heavy duty black trash bags
      The trash bags are to sleep in, in a pinch. I have done it before and believe me it wasn't comfortable but I was way warmer than my buddies

      This is what I take along with me, but I mostly go short trips (5-7 miles) on foot, so it is light and simple. It should also be noted that this is what I carry while I am out in the winter.

      Just my thoughts
      "If you were to spit in a snake's eye, you would have to stoop to his level to do so."

      Comment


      • #33
        A great emergency stove

        I carry an emergency kit similar to what several people here have posted but one thing I recently added was a small emergency stove that weighs nearly nothing (a third of an ounce). It's made from a soda can but very professionally done. I bought mine here:

        http://stores.ebay.com/Thru-Hikers-C...eNameZl4QQtZkm

        It cost me $5.98 which I consider it worth because I don't have the tools or the patience to make one. The guy sends it in a nice little container with instructions. The recommended fuel is methyl alcohol which is what HEET is made of but other fuels will also work. Now I'm not saying this is going to replace my MSR Dragonfly but in a pinch this is better than nothing and it's small enough and light enough that I can and will take it when I would not consider taking one of my larger camp stoves.

        As it happens, I found this stove suggestion here, and for you survivalists out there this guy is funny and knowledgeable and has a lot of good ideas for survival:
        http://www.m4040.com/Survival/Survival.htm
        "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

        Comment

        Footer Ad Module 300 x 300

        Collapse

        Footer Adsense

        Collapse
        Working...
        X