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  • #16
    Originally posted by PG13 View Post
    Do yourself a favor and just buy Hank's newest book. Until it arrives, use his extensive recipe collection on his website:

    https://honest-food.net/wild-game/ra...irrel-recipes/
    Thanks just ordered it
    Is it opening day of duck season yet
    Member of Alaska Waterfowl Association

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    • #17
      Hasenpfeffer
      Make a marinade
      1 cup water1 cup red wine
      1 cup red wine vinegar

      1 tablespoon salt
      2 tablespoons chopped rosemary (fresh is better)

      1 tablespoon juniper berries, crushed

      1 tablespoon cracked black peppercorns

      3 bay leaves

      4 cloves
      1 teaspoon dried thyme
      1/2 cup chopped onions

      Put everything in a pot, bring to a boil and simmer for 15 minutes. Cool to room temp



      1 snowshoe hare, or rabbit, or 3-4 squirrels cut up into serving size pieces

      MARINATE MEAT in Ziploc bags in the fridge for 24 to 48 hours



      1 full stick butter butter + 2 TBSP cooking oil

      Flour for dredging

      1 tsp each salt, pepper, ground or rubbed sage, and 1/2 tsp nutmeg

      2 to 3 cups chopped onion

      4 or 5 slabbed carrots or parsnips (peeled, split, cut in 3rds)

      4 or 5 stalks celery cut in 4ths

      1/4 cup sour cream



      When it's time to cook setup plates for dredging and get out your Dutch oven or heavy casserole
      Preheat the oven to 325
      Remove the hare from the marinade and pat it dry. Save the marinade.
      Heat the oil and half the butter in Dutch oven/casserole on medium. Mix spices into flour and dredge the meat and brown well on all sides.
      Remove meat pieces as they brown and set aside

      As the last pieces are browning strain the marinade into a bowl.


      After the meat is done melt remaining butter then add the onion and stir to coat with the butter. Cook onions over medium-high heat until they are soft and a little brown on the edges. Sprinkle salt over them as they cook.

      Return the browned meat to the pot and add the strained marinade. Bring to a simmer, add remaining vegetables, cover and put into the oven.
      Cook until the meat wants to fall off the bones: This will take 2 to 4 hours for wild meat, or between 90 minutes and 2 hours for a store-bought rabbit.

      To serve the hasenpfeffer, remove it from the Dutch oven/casserole and add 1 cup of sour cream to the sauce and mix on low heat just enough to heat sour cream. Plate the meat with some pieces of vegetables and spoon some of the sauce over everything
      If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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      • #18
        Put it in a crockpot with water covering it, add a chicken bullion cube and let it cook several hours. Meat falls off the bone (like shredded meat) and is delicious.
        Use it like chicken for anything from tacos to stroganoff to ďpulled porkĒ sandwiches.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Erik in AK View Post
          Hasenpfeffer
          Make a marinade
          1 cup water1 cup red wine
          1 cup red wine vinegar

          1 tablespoon salt
          2 tablespoons chopped rosemary (fresh is better)

          1 tablespoon juniper berries, crushed

          1 tablespoon cracked black peppercorns

          3 bay leaves

          4 cloves
          1 teaspoon dried thyme
          1/2 cup chopped onions

          Put everything in a pot, bring to a boil and simmer for 15 minutes. Cool to room temp



          1 snowshoe hare, or rabbit, or 3-4 squirrels cut up into serving size pieces

          MARINATE MEAT in Ziploc bags in the fridge for 24 to 48 hours



          1 full stick butter butter + 2 TBSP cooking oil

          Flour for dredging

          1 tsp each salt, pepper, ground or rubbed sage, and 1/2 tsp nutmeg

          2 to 3 cups chopped onion

          4 or 5 slabbed carrots or parsnips (peeled, split, cut in 3rds)

          4 or 5 stalks celery cut in 4ths

          1/4 cup sour cream



          When it's time to cook setup plates for dredging and get out your Dutch oven or heavy casserole
          Preheat the oven to 325
          Remove the hare from the marinade and pat it dry. Save the marinade.
          Heat the oil and half the butter in Dutch oven/casserole on medium. Mix spices into flour and dredge the meat and brown well on all sides.
          Remove meat pieces as they brown and set aside

          As the last pieces are browning strain the marinade into a bowl.


          After the meat is done melt remaining butter then add the onion and stir to coat with the butter. Cook onions over medium-high heat until they are soft and a little brown on the edges. Sprinkle salt over them as they cook.

          Return the browned meat to the pot and add the strained marinade. Bring to a simmer, add remaining vegetables, cover and put into the oven.
          Cook until the meat wants to fall off the bones: This will take 2 to 4 hours for wild meat, or between 90 minutes and 2 hours for a store-bought rabbit.

          To serve the hasenpfeffer, remove it from the Dutch oven/casserole and add 1 cup of sour cream to the sauce and mix on low heat just enough to heat sour cream. Plate the meat with some pieces of vegetables and spoon some of the sauce over everything
          That sounds yummy! Thanks for reminding me. I also brown them in flour and butter/oil prior to cooking.
          Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by FishGod View Post
            That sounds yummy!
            I was thinking the same thing!

            So that's how hasenpfeffer is made. Makes me wish I killed more cottontails when I was down in the lower 48. Now THOSE are some delicious rabbits, hasenpfeffer or not. But I sure wish I would have tried it back then. Unfortunately I haven't killed a snowshoe in years. Just don't see them around like we used to...
            Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by akrstabout View Post
              I donít soak em. No need. Cook fresh. Often slow simmer till falls off the bone, hour or less, while doin that throw in veggies ya already chopped while simmering bunny. Add noodles. I like soup over a big pile of mashed potatoes. Or more often I just mashed potatoes in same pot. Makes a thick style stew.


              Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
              No offense, but I respectfully disagree. I shoot and eat a lot of rabbits. Probably at least 20-30 a year, if not more. And in my opinion, soaking in saltwater is a must. Unless you like your meat to taste gamey. But everyone's different I guess.

              Originally posted by Erik in AK View Post
              Hasenpfeffer
              Make a marinade
              1 cup water1 cup red wine
              1 cup red wine vinegar

              1 tablespoon salt
              2 tablespoons chopped rosemary (fresh is better)

              1 tablespoon juniper berries, crushed

              1 tablespoon cracked black peppercorns

              3 bay leaves

              4 cloves
              1 teaspoon dried thyme
              1/2 cup chopped onions

              Put everything in a pot, bring to a boil and simmer for 15 minutes. Cool to room temp



              1 snowshoe hare, or rabbit, or 3-4 squirrels cut up into serving size pieces

              MARINATE MEAT in Ziploc bags in the fridge for 24 to 48 hours



              1 full stick butter butter + 2 TBSP cooking oil

              Flour for dredging

              1 tsp each salt, pepper, ground or rubbed sage, and 1/2 tsp nutmeg

              2 to 3 cups chopped onion

              4 or 5 slabbed carrots or parsnips (peeled, split, cut in 3rds)

              4 or 5 stalks celery cut in 4ths

              1/4 cup sour cream



              When it's time to cook setup plates for dredging and get out your Dutch oven or heavy casserole
              Preheat the oven to 325
              Remove the hare from the marinade and pat it dry. Save the marinade.
              Heat the oil and half the butter in Dutch oven/casserole on medium. Mix spices into flour and dredge the meat and brown well on all sides.
              Remove meat pieces as they brown and set aside

              As the last pieces are browning strain the marinade into a bowl.


              After the meat is done melt remaining butter then add the onion and stir to coat with the butter. Cook onions over medium-high heat until they are soft and a little brown on the edges. Sprinkle salt over them as they cook.

              Return the browned meat to the pot and add the strained marinade. Bring to a simmer, add remaining vegetables, cover and put into the oven.
              Cook until the meat wants to fall off the bones: This will take 2 to 4 hours for wild meat, or between 90 minutes and 2 hours for a store-bought rabbit.

              To serve the hasenpfeffer, remove it from the Dutch oven/casserole and add 1 cup of sour cream to the sauce and mix on low heat just enough to heat sour cream. Plate the meat with some pieces of vegetables and spoon some of the sauce over everything
              I've never really cared for Hassenfeffer. We've tried it a couple different times and didn't care for it. I think it's an acquired taste.

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
                No offense, but I respectfully disagree. I shoot and eat a lot of rabbits. Probably at least 20-30 a year, if not more. And in my opinion, soaking in saltwater is a must. Unless you like your meat to taste gamey. But everyone's different I guess.



                I've never really cared for Hassenfeffer. We've tried it a couple different times and didn't care for it. I think it's an acquired taste.
                Donít think itíd gamey, I clean right away in field tho, atleast fling the guts out. I donít eat as many as you and havenít even killed one in 3 years I think. But hope to this year. Miss that bunny stew.


                Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
                  No offense, but I respectfully disagree. I shoot and eat a lot of rabbits. Probably at least 20-30 a year, if not more. And in my opinion, soaking in saltwater is a must. Unless you like your meat to taste gamey. But everyone's different I guess.
                  I agree. It's old school imo....My Dad used to soak all small game before eating. From rabbits and squirrel to pheasants, ducks and geese. It's draws a lot of blood impurities out that can make some of those critters a little strong tasting.
                  Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by 4merguide View Post
                    I agree. It's old school imo....My Dad used to soak all small game before eating. From rabbits and squirrel to pheasants, ducks and geese. It's draws a lot of blood impurities out that can make some of those critters a little strong tasting.
                    Yep, exactly. I also found that it makes it a whole lot easier to separate out the blood shot meat and any pellets if they were shot with a shotgun. If I am hunting alone I use a .22 or a .17 hmr., but when I'm hunting with my beagle I use a shotgun because she runs the hares so fast in front of me. After soaking the meat for a day or two the texture and color of the meat starts to change a lot and the contrast between what's edible and non-edible is more apparent.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Sign me up for overnight soaks for all the same reasons, a cup of salt to a gallon of water.

                      As for cooking, I'll tell you a secret. I grew up on a ranch down on the border, and ranchers don't eat beef unless they have to put down an animal before market time. YOU DON'T EAT MEAT YOU CAN SELL. We ate a whole of wild game, especially rabbits.

                      Here's another secret:

                      Texas-style chili was invented for tough jackrabbits and not for beef! You may never use beef again after you've used snowshoe hare instead to make your favorite chili. Young snowshoes are dandy for frying, but those tough old-timers are prime for chili.
                      "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
                      Merle Haggard

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by BrownBear View Post
                        Sign me up for overnight soaks for all the same reasons, a cup of salt to a gallon of water.

                        As for cooking, I'll tell you a secret. I grew up on a ranch down on the border, and ranchers don't eat beef unless they have to put down an animal before market time. YOU DON'T EAT MEAT YOU CAN SELL. We ate a whole of wild game, especially rabbits.

                        Here's another secret:

                        Texas-style chili was invented for tough jackrabbits and not for beef! You may never use beef again after you've used snowshoe hare instead to make your favorite chili. Young snowshoes are dandy for frying, but those tough old-timers are prime for chili.
                        Nice. I may have to try that out.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I cook rabbit/hare in all the same ways I cook chicken....only difference: it's SOoooo much better! (Rabbit/hare is to chicken as King Salmon is to halibut).
                          ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
                          I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
                          The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It

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                          • #28
                            We debone and grind them. Cut it with beef and or pork and make bunny burgers. Just another way, and can make a lot of things with ground meat.


                            Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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                            • #29
                              The first winter I was married (72-73) there were no jobs, Nelchina caribou populations had crashed, darn few moose, and a bazillion rabbits. Guess what we ate 3 or 4 times a week, ground, stewed, fried, wrapped in bacon and baked next to taters and carrots,... My favorite was slow-cooked and boned rabbit mixed into a pot of pearl barley and tomato soup. I got sooo tired of dressing and skinning the buggers, but they were what was available. A couple of years later my finances were a bit more solid, and I took in 40 pounds of boned rabbit to Alaska Sausage and had Polish sausage made. Best use of rabbit ever.

                              It was no problem taking a limit every week from the same 20 acre patch of brush between the Parks Highway and the railroad tracks.

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