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Secret Ptarmigan Hunting Spot

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  • Secret Ptarmigan Hunting Spot

    I know hunters won't give up their secret spot for ptarmigan hunting, but I'll put in the miles and bust the brush. I'm just asking that you get me pointed in the right direction. Please list a trail or two that you've had success on within 2hr of Anchorage.

    Thanks,
    Casey

  • #2
    Try the center ridge trail out of turnigian pass. Leave from the skier side parking lot watch for avalanche with this weather.

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    • #3
      It may just be me, but I've just never seen all that many ptarmigan in the Kenai mountains, never spent time in the Alaska range.


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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      • #4
        Powerline Pass just above Anchorage.

        Back of Palmer Creek

        Summit Creek trail (Near the south end of Summit Lake)

        You need to drive to the highest elevation you can, and then climb from there. The upper hillside above Anchorage has a lot of them. They are above the Alders, and just where the willow brush starts to thin-out to open Alpine or barren rocks.
        ALASKA is a "HARD COUNTRY for OLDMEN". (But if you live it wide'ass open, balls'to the wall, the pedal floored, full throttle, it is a delightful place, to finally just sit-back and savor those memories while sipping Tequila).

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        • #5
          A trail ? Pick a mountain or ridge and climb, fat chance of finding game on a hiking trail...

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          • #6
            Originally posted by .338WM View Post
            A trail ? Pick a mountain or ridge and climb, fat chance of finding game on a hiking trail...
            This is truth. It's not that trails aren't a good starting point, but any alpine area will hold ptarmigan - rock ptarmigan up on the windblown ridges, willow ptarmigan down in the willows and alders. There isn't a bad place to hunt ptarmigan if above treeline, and the further from other people the better. Pick a spot and climb, and if in winter, watch for little white balls with small black eyeballs at the base of groups of alders and willows. Often their eyes are the first thing I see.

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            • #7
              Thanks guys

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Brian M View Post
                This is truth. It's not that trails aren't a good starting point, but any alpine area will hold ptarmigan - rock ptarmigan up on the windblown ridges, willow ptarmigan down in the willows and alders. There isn't a bad place to hunt ptarmigan if above treeline, and the further from other people the better. Pick a spot and climb, and if in winter, watch for little white balls with small black eyeballs at the base of groups of alders and willows. Often their eyes are the first thing I see.
                I agree with both of you guys. Trails are a good starting point to gain some elevation before breaking off trail. Thanks for the tips and advice.

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                • #9
                  Brian gave you great advice.

                  In winter ptarmigan are always on the move. They are like little fugitives, dressed in the best of camo, don't move around a lot unless to eat, never sleep in the same place twice. One day you will hit pay dirt and strike it rich and find large covies and scattered pairs and threesomes. Next day you will find nothing. Ptarmigan are where you find them. Go up high, put in the time and the miles, and you will find them. If you don't have a good dog or two you might consider using a binocular much like you would for big game. Sometimes snowballs actually do fly. Best of luck on your adventure.

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                  • #10
                    dont want to be a kill joy but...do check your regulations...not every ridge is open to firearms or hunting without registration

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                    • #11
                      Brian is spot on, but I look more for tracks in the snow. Very distinguishable tracks.

                      One place where I hunt them is a willowy river bottom. I have pushed them up the canyon, gathering flocks along the way. Gets pretty exciting.

                      River bottom


                      Out on the flats moose hunting
                      Live life and love it
                      Love life and live it

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                      • #12
                        Don't forget bowhunting for ptarmigan too!
                        Bowhunting Birds on a Mountain Military Base: http://youtu.be/vE35-4cKjBo

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                        • #13
                          if you are willing to put in some miles driving north from Anchorage shoot me a PM (if you have a sno go/ track vehicle) if not I have another area that you can access (same area) by foot but not as much area to play in as the sno-go area).

                          "Whoever said the pen is mightier than the sword obviously never encountered automatic weapons."

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                          • #14
                            I wonder how the lack of snow is affecting the ptarmigan, as in whether they are still staying high. It has always been my experience that deep snow drives them down... yet I have seen resident flocks near saltwater on Bristol Bay and Cook inlet, so maybe not always the case.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by sayak View Post
                              I wonder how the lack of snow is affecting the ptarmigan, as in whether they are still staying high. It has always been my experience that deep snow drives them down... yet I have seen resident flocks near saltwater on Bristol Bay and Cook inlet, so maybe not always the case.
                              They will move down even with lack of snow cover when the food supply up high becomes exhausted, so the move to lower elevations is inevitable.

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