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Lead for Bullet casting(Fairbanks)

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  • Lead for Bullet casting(Fairbanks)

    Trying to bird dog some lead for bullet casting for my whitworth rifle Anyone have any suggestions?

  • #2
    Check with plumbers and recycle centers in your area. You can always buy it from Rotometals, but lots more fun and cheaper to dredge up local sources.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

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    • #3
      Originally posted by wingerdt View Post
      Trying to bird dog some lead for bullet casting for my whitworth rifle Anyone have any suggestions?
      I use to go to Seward and get old lead lines from nets also Homer was a good source usually a few hundred pounds . That's was 4 years ago last time I went searching before I moved to Manley
      . How much you needing.

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      • #4
        I think I'd try tire stores. Usually they take the old weights they take off of old tires to balance them with new and the old discarded.

        Patriot Life Member NRA
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        • #5
          Are muzzleloaders loaded with mostly pure lead (soft) bullets? Are untreated wheel weight lead bullets soft enough?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by LeonardC View Post
            Are muzzleloaders loaded with mostly pure lead (soft) bullets? Are untreated wheel weight lead bullets soft enough?
            For patched round balls alloy of any form including wheelweights can be fine, especially for extra penetration.

            But for bullets or "conicals" you need very pure lead so the bullet will "upset" or swell a little to fully fill the bore and engage the rifling for accuracy. If cast true bore size from alloy you'd need a sledge hammer and a staff of helpers to beat it down the muzzle.

            The only real exception for any alloying metals in bullets come with those having lots of grease groves. For uniformity all the edges need to be sharp and well-filled, but it's really tough to do with pure lead. Adding a little tiny bit of tin- on the order of 2-3%- helps the lead flow better while not making the bullets too hard to upset.
            "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
            Merle Haggard

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            • #7
              Thank you. I've got a TC in .54 I need to start shooting. I have a little pure lead stashed away just for this rifle. Going to use the TC molds. I always thought pure lead was "required". Adding the tin makes sense.

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              • #8
                The little bit of tin doesn't harden them excessively, while it sure helps you turn out purty perfect bullets, as needed for best accuracy.
                "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
                Merle Haggard

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