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Muzzleloader Safety/ Common Sense?

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  • Muzzleloader Safety/ Common Sense?

    So....I'm newer to muzzleloaders, but have completed the state certification course. I'm going to be hunting this fall/winter on the DM766 draw hunt and need some advice.
    So, I load with IMR White Hot and powerbelt bullets.
    Once I'm in my hunting area should I load up and just leave the firing cap off?
    Should I travel while hunting with my muzzleloader loaded but without the cap?
    Is it advisable to clear the load from the muzzleloader after a certain amount of time or days, if it hasn't been fired?
    Sorry if these seem like dumb questions, but still new to me.

    Thanks,
    John
    John
    www.alaskaadventurejournal.com

  • #2
    Dunno all that much about inlines any more, but here goes based on my experience with different components than you're using.

    I keep them loaded but unprimed. I prime them as I go into the field, then unprime when I come back out. I have a piece of black electrical tape over the muzzle at all times to keep out rain, mud, sticks and snow. When unprimed, I cover the nipple to keep moisture from getting to the powder at that end. I don't carry my loaded (but not primed) guns from the cold outdoors into a heated car or truck cab or house. That can cause lots of condensation. I put them in the trunk or bed for transport, and I stow them outside when I get home. I'm in a real wet area, and that "formula" has prevented problems for decades. I can't say the same for the early years when I got sloppy about keeping my powder dry.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

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    • #3
      I have hunted with muzzle loaders for the past 35 years. I have used cap and ball and now inline with 209 primers. I just load and put a primer in the primer pocket. Back when I used cap in ball you had to be a bit more careful because of the hammer. I just did a caribou hunt with my inline and harvested a young bull. The newer inline are as safe as any other rifle as long as you are following the 4 cardinal rules of safety at all time.
      I always keep a second or third primer ready because on extended hunts when its wet they will fail.

      Have fun with and practice ranging
      sigpic
      Sweepint
      Wasilla,
      '' Livn' The Dream ''
      26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

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      • #4
        Sure appreciate the advice guys! We will be staying in my Arctic Oven with a wood stove inside and I would have brought that muzzleloader inside every night. I'll just let it stay cold in a storage case outdoors, with the black tape on the end! Appreciate any other advice, including best stalking techniques for bulls past the rut in snow! This will likely be an early December hunt.
        Thanks
        John
        www.alaskaadventurejournal.com

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        • #5
          Does anybody have a good suggestion for something to put in an inline 209 primer pocket if you want to keep a charge in but do not want it primed? I have been using a fired primer that I colored with a red sharpy, but would really like something else.

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          • #6
            A bud uses a pencil eraser, but I don't know a lot of the details. Evidently it's a little long, but compresses when closed. Pops up just enough he can get hold of it when he wants to remove it. I'd sure figure out the details at home and make sure you can get it out before heading out on a hunt though!
            "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
            Merle Haggard

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            • #7
              That might work, I'll play around with it. Thanks.

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              • #8
                The thing I don't recall (and he's beyond phone reach), is which eraser fit best. One was perfect- no friction when put in place, but cut a little long, it "squishes" into place for a tight seal. Easy to remove (falls out) when the bolt is opened.
                "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
                Merle Haggard

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                • #9
                  I never thought about protecting the empty primer pocket from moisture!
                  Thanks!
                  John
                  www.alaskaadventurejournal.com

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