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Dry Aging a Dinosaur Bull

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  • #16
    Originally posted by rooster85 View Post
    years ago when I lived out west, the guy that taught me how to properly butcher told me something similar. He lets his mulies hang, in his shack mind you, until it grew a mold then he cut and wrapped. Every cut was fork tender in his words. I've never let them hang that long.
    Many years ago when I lived in the Sierras I killed a nice big mulie. I got it home whole the same night and hung it in the garage with hide still on. The garage was not heated and that night it got down below freezing outside. The deer meat didn't freeze but got super cold. I let it hang for only a couple days and then did it up. That meat was still so cold under that hide as even though it would warm during the day the hide insulated it from the little bit of heat change in the garage. I still remember my hands barely being able to handle it from being so cold. Even though it only hung a few days the meat was still excellent. I can't remember how the temp stayed outside, but I wonder if it did stay cold(ish) if I could have left it hang like that with skin on for who knows how long? I also would think that with the hide on, it would help with the change in humidity?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by rooster85 View Post
      .He lets his mulies hang, in his shack mind you, until it grew a mold then he cut and wrapped....
      Many places we'd hunt mulies and blacktails would be in hot country. My Dad was a big advocate of using vinegar water to wipe down the meat while hanging to avoid mold and help build the protective crust. I've done the same here while hanging moose meat when conditions weren't that good outside.
      Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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      • #18
        I'm very surprised to hear this. I grew up in Idaho hunting whitetail, mule deer and elk. I don't know anyone who was particularly fond of mule deer, including me and I've shot my fair share of them. My wife finally discovered that cooked all day in a crock pot with a can of cream of mushroom or cream of chicken soup, it was decent for the table. The whitetail is another story, it's one of my favorite wild meats. Probably second to elk, but of course, moose is right up there with elk. JMHO
        Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Doug in Alaska View Post
          I'm very surprised to hear this. I grew up in Idaho hunting whitetail, mule deer and elk. I don't know anyone who was particularly fond of mule deer, including me and I've shot my fair share of them. My wife finally discovered that cooked all day in a crock pot with a can of cream of mushroom or cream of chicken soup, it was decent for the table. The whitetail is another story, it's one of my favorite wild meats. Probably second to elk, but of course, moose is right up there with elk. JMHO
          Well, as you've probably heard before, mule deer meat can be an acquired taste (lol), but I was pretty much raised on it and have always loved it since I was a baby. Big thick steak on the grill is my favorite as is pretty much any other deer, elk, sheep, moose, etc... I'm curious if many you ate were feeding on a lot of sage brush? They say that if that's pretty much all they eat it can give it some pretty strong flavor. Or are you just talking about it being gamey?
          Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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          • #20
            Yes, I'd say they were feeding on sage brush. Most were killed in the breaks of the Salmon River and Snake River.
            Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.

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            • #21
              What elevation is that? Many of the mulies we hunted were pretty high, upwards of 10k feet sometimes. Different kinds of feed up there. I remember sitting my Dad down to a fresh grilled mulie steak and him taking the first bite and saying "You took good care of this one." I said, "Well it's all your fault Dad." See, he was meticulous when it came to field dressing and butchering his deer and taught me the same.
              Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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              • #22
                If I understand this right, you are using all your trimmings? I would never have imagined they would be any good. I have ground scraps into sausage and mixed with meat and usually regret it.
                My only gear sponsor is the salvation army - Dick Griffith

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by scott_rn View Post
                  If I understand this right, you are using all your trimmings? I would never have imagined they would be any good. I have ground scraps into sausage and mixed with meat and usually regret it.
                  Not all of the trimmings, no. The sinewy trim does not get salvaged. With dry aging you end up with significant trim of what would have been good meat had it not dried up. I've used these dried trim scraps in burger, sausages, and to season broth and salts.

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