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What cut of meat is this?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by knikglacier View Post
    An interesting topic. You have the two backstraps on either side of the spine and the hanging tenderloins underneath the spine just forward the pelvic area. This forward tenderloin concept is one I never heard. I wish that tiny diagram gavre us more detail.
    I googled "neck chain meat" and found this. If I recall it looked a lot like this on the moose.... http://www.harveybeefexports.com/pro...ef-neck-chain/
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    • #17
      Originally posted by 4merguide View Post
      I googled "neck chain meat" and found this. If I recall it looked a lot like this on the moose.... http://www.harveybeefexports.com/pro...ef-neck-chain/

      That cant be it. On your link it says it's "offal". The piece we had was really really 'good' !
      Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine! :whistle:
      WWG1WGA! QANON

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      • #18
        I call them the "neck tenders." Cows don't seem to have them. I 'm slaughtering some more today and I'll look. The "hanging tenders" in a beef are in the same region as the tenderloins. They can come out with the liver, lungs and rumen if you're not careful while gutting.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by willphish4food View Post
          I call them the "neck tenders." Cows don't seem to have them. I 'm slaughtering some more today and I'll look. The "hanging tenders" in a beef are in the same region as the tenderloins. They can come out with the liver, lungs and rumen if you're not careful while gutting.
          Well, I looked more carefully yesterday. I'm not sure if this piece has an official name; I've worked for 3 butchers, and all put this piece into hamburger or stew meat. Physiologically, it sits behind the lungs, and rests between the inside of the ribs and the spine. I'll try to post some pics.

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          • #20
            Click image for larger version

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ID:	2498689Pic one shows the hanging tenders to the left, neck tenders to the right. Brisket has been split open, you are looking through the brisket toward the spine. Second picture is zoomed out and focused more on the hanging tenders, which begin right where the tenderloins end. Liver, lungs and rumen are attached to these.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by willphish4food View Post
              Pic one shows the hanging tenders to the left, neck tenders to the right. Brisket has been split open, you are looking through the brisket toward the spine. Second picture is zoomed out and focused more on the hanging tenders, which begin right where the tenderloins end. Liver, lungs and rumen are attached to these.
              These show the piece of meat that I understood 4mer to be describing. They start out pretty skinny toward the rear of the muscle but then get a thicker up closer to the first couple of ribs, but still remain a pretty slender cut over all. I have always just ground this piece, but look forward to trying it next time. 4mer did you just season it whole and cook it or did you slice it and cook it like medallion's? Maybe since this piece is closer to the neck it gets a little more use than the tender loin and has better flavor.

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              • #22
                [QUOTE=4merguide;1612284]Thanks Steve....do they call it that on a beef cow as well? Before I posted this I looked at beef cut diagrams and didn't find any mention of it, unless they leave it on when cutting the bone as well? And yes, that's how we cooked it....chopped it up small, threw in a little cooking oil, salt and pepper, and seared it quick on fairly high heat.

                This ^^... It was cut in bite size pieces and seared.

                And yes, willphish, that is the meat we speak of.
                Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine! :whistle:
                WWG1WGA! QANON

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                • #23
                  I have never heard a name for this meat in the butcher world. As I said earlier, they just stay on the ribs and go into burger. Really a shame, but after aging 9 days there isn't much left of them. This is likely why they aren't shown on butchering cut diagrams, too. "Neck tenders" is just my personal name for them.

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