Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Heart & Tongue

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Heart & Tongue

    I've never kept/processed either before but am going to try them in the future. I have a goat hunt coming up and thought, Why not?

    For those of you who keep them, how do you clean the heart? Do you trim off artery or valve tissue? Slice like a tomato? Cube it? I've heard of pickled heart and will probably go that route. Open to suggestions.

    As to the tongue? My wife is of Mexican descent and I likes me some lengua. Question is how to get the meat out.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  • #2
    Originally posted by Erik in AK View Post
    I've never kept/processed either before but am going to try them in the future. I have a goat hunt coming up and thought, Why not?

    For those of you who keep them, how do you clean the heart? Do you trim off artery or valve tissue? Slice like a tomato? Cube it? I've heard of pickled heart and will probably go that route. Open to suggestions.

    As to the tongue? My wife is of Mexican descent and I likes me some lengua. Question is how to get the meat out.
    I enjoy heart and tongue. For heart I clean the valves out in the sink by running water through it. Then cut off the top with all the white fat looking stuff. I Cut the heart into 1/2 -3/4 inch slices and cook in a pan with butter some seasoning and garlic. For tongue I boil then peel it. Slice it sprinkle with salt and pepper. I like it served hot or cold and sometimes with a little vinegar. Moose tongue is so much better than cow tongue. My five year old loves both heart and tongue.

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks Andy!

      I will give it a try.
      If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

      Comment


      • #4
        We usually always save the Heart from our deer down here in Southeast. It's delicious and almost indistinguishable from a piece of backstrap when cooked properly; because in reality it's just another muscle. We usually just cut out the heart and soak in water (usually salt water), doing water changes until the heart stops releasing blood. If you want to speed up the process you can give the heart little compressions to purge out excess blood. Then pan fry as you would a normal piece of deer steak. It's always exceptionally tender and delicious!

        As far as tongue, I cooked some deer tongue with a buddy last year. We boiled it and then cut the skin off it. As far as deer tongue is concerned, I'm always for using as much of the animal as you can; but I think deer tongue isn't really worth the work for how little meat you end up with. Plus, I didn't exactly like the texture/taste/smell of it. Just my experience of course

        Have yet to try Liver, but I already know/feel I won't like it judging by others' descriptions. Irony/bloody/spongy doesn't appeal to me.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Erik in AK View Post
          I've never kept/processed either before but am going to try them in the future. I have a goat hunt coming up and thought, Why not?

          For those of you who keep them, how do you clean the heart? Do you trim off artery or valve tissue? Slice like a tomato? Cube it? I've heard of pickled heart and will probably go that route. Open to suggestions.

          As to the tongue? My wife is of Mexican descent and I likes me some lengua. Question is how to get the meat out.
          This will be my third heart. First one I cut into strips and fried. It was ok. Last year I was given one that I baked. I stuffed with sausage and dressing then baked it. Wow. Great taste. For tongue I do it Spanish style (wife is Puerto Rican and Colombian). I've never tried heart or tongue from deer or goats. Though I discussed this possibility all weekend.

          Comment


          • #6
            Best tongue I have had was moose, Best heart deer!

            Comment


            • #7
              I like to use both to make fajitas. I crave that meal bout once every month!

              Comment


              • #8
                We always take a big white onion with us. Sliced Heart or Liver, fried up on a griddle with slices of the white onion are a GREAT camp meal after you've spent the day field dressing and packing in your moose. In all honesty, the liver from an old bull in rut isn't all that good, but from a young spike/fork it's really good.

                Comment


                • #9
                  to save the tonque-- I cut the jaw musles on one side and roll back
                  then just start fillitting off the tongue from the lower jaw

                  if big moose- there is lots of meat on the head

                  on a deer- you can cook the whole head for a meal


                  good eats, either way

                  Chris

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    some natives will split the head into sections and cook separatly

                    moose nose soup/stew, ect

                    Chris

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We have been keeping Whitetail heart for 30+ years and it is always a treat. Cut up into chunks and slow cooked in fry pan with mushrooms and onions for an hour on low heat (add the mushrooms half way thru). It is a great treat at deer camp.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by akgun&ammo View Post
                        ...to save the tonque....
                        We take the tonge the same way we do when butchering beef-

                        Point the head up in the air to expose the underside of the jaw. Cut the hide from one corner of the jaw forward to the front, then do the same thing on the other side, so you drop the hide away from the underside of the tongue. Now grab the tongue and pull it straight down as far as it will go and cut it off well down in the throat. You'll be surprised just how big even a deer tongue is.

                        For cooking, simmer or boil in seasoned water until the skin can be pulled free. Cool and peel the rest of the skin off.

                        We slice it and serve it cold with an Italian herb salad dressing for "pickled" tongue.
                        We cut it in chunks and simmer in green chilli sauce for lengua en chili verde.
                        We cut it in chunks, brown it lightly in a fry pan with onions for lengua tacos.
                        We cut it in chunks, then simmer in red chili sauce lengua en chili colorado.
                        We slice it and eat it cold in sandwiches.

                        Heart we do as others have described here with a few additions:
                        We grind it and cook like burger with seasonings for tacos.
                        Slice leftovers into slivers, add lots to brown gravy and eat over mashy taters.
                        Cut it in hunks and use in shepherds pie or pot pie.
                        "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
                        Merle Haggard

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          One of my favorites is thin sliced tongue piled on rye bread with swiss cheese and mustard.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ah man....

                            You keep talking like that and I'm going to be eating an early lunch! :topjob:
                            "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
                            Merle Haggard

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Old John View Post
                              We always take a big white onion with us. Sliced Heart or Liver, fried up on a griddle with slices of the white onion are a GREAT camp meal after you've spent the day field dressing and packing in your moose. In all honesty, the liver from an old bull in rut isn't all that good, but from a young spike/fork it's really good.
                              I agree..... Always like fresh moose liver and onions. Don't like beef liver, but love moose.

                              Been eating heart since I was a little kid. I still have half a moose heart in the freeze. Been thinking about smoking it. Anybody ever smoke moose heart?

                              But what I REALLY want to know is how many of you eat brains...!!! Can't say I have that's for sure........lol
                              Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

                              Comment

                              Footer Adsense

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X