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  • Bear hide after the hunt???

    If I'm successful in May when I fly up for a spring bear hunt, what does anyone suggest as the best course of action with the hide? Should I just prep it and fly it back home to a taxidermist here to have a rug made, or is there someone in Petersburg that you would recommend?
    Thanks
    Keith

  • #2
    If you have a Taxidermist in your area that does bear rugs and is good at it then I'd say prep it and have them do it. My reasoning is that if they know what they are doing and are good you'll get the same outcome for a lot less. A friend of mine came up 3 yrs ago and took a nice Bou and blackie, we preped them and he had his taxi do it. Total cost for the Bou $475.00,bear(6'6") was $650 rugged with double felt and they look better than a lot I've seen here in AK. It'll cost you close to a grand or better here in AK just for a good rug.

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    • #3
      Thanks for your inpur GAredneck!

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      • #4
        Although I have field processed over 200 pelts ansd skins, I still like to get them to a tannery as soon as possible.

        While in the field I get all the meat and fat off the skin, salt and drain off the fluid twice. (Ask your preferred taxidermist what he advises.)

        Then, when I arrive in Anchorage I like to get pelts and skins immediately to ALFA Fur Dressers, phone # (907) 868-3227. Gary at Alfa Fur will ship the tanned pruduct wherever you want, anywhere in the world.

        And I advise you to choose that preferred taxidermist based on the quality of his work, not at all on price/costs. All my early budget mounts have had be be remounted by a professional.
        Imagine (It's easy if you try)
        …miles and miles of mountains…wide expanses of tundra...remote wild waters…
        (Whisper words of wisdom) Let It Be

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        • #5
          +1 with AKTrueAdventure on making sure you get a quality taxidermist. My point I was making is that you can get the same quality for your trophy for a lot less money in the lower 48 and you want have the possible issues of getting in touch with them, checking on your trophy and if you're not happy with your end result, being able to deal with the person face to face and not over the phone. I use a taxi here in AK and he is good, but I sure wish he had prices like my old taxi did back in GA on his deer. To get a deer mounted up here will typically run you about $550-$750 for a shoulder mount, go south and you can get a taxi to do the same mount for $300-$400.

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          • #6
            You must remove the skull from the hide for the sealing process and it must be unfrozen when taken to the sealer. Remember to leave evidence of sex attached to the hide. Place your tag in a place that will not get in the way of the flesher or taxidermists.

            Do not salt your hide until it has been fleshed properly and the feet and toes skinned and fleshed ... ears turned ... lips and eyes split.

            One of the Taxidermists night mare ... an improperly salted hide.

            Expect to spend about 3 to 5 or more hours on the fleshing job. Freezing is what some hunters do but if it gets misplaced as airline baggage or sits on a hot tarmac a frozen hide can be ruined. If freezing .. roll (or fold) it up so the head is on the outside of the roll not on the inside.
            johnnie laird

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            • #7
              Originally posted by muskeg View Post
              Remember to leave evidence of sex attached to the hide. Place your tag in a place that will not get in the way of the flesher or taxidermists.
              One good place to put your locking tag is in either the penis or vaginal opening, as Muskeg mentioned you are required to leave proof of sex anyway.

              Steve
              Last edited by stid2677; 04-04-2011, 07:16.
              "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"

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              • #8
                Thanks for all the good info! I appreciate it!

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                • #9
                  Hope you have a good hunt. This guys done 3 of my bears, 2 blackies and 1 brownie, and I liked his work. A few things to take into account, I always take along 5-10 lbs of non-iodized salt and salt the hide in case it takes awhile to get it on ice.
                  I got my last blackie 2 days after 9/11 and when I went to ship it, it was a block of ice. The new TSA at the time said they had to visually inspect it which I said was impossible. We ended up running it through the airports xray machine so they could see that it wasn't haboring a WMD.
                  Just my 2 cents.
                  Here's the link from outdoor forums for the guy I've used.
                  http://outdoorsdirectory.com/directory/taxiderm.htm
                  HL Mencken, defined a demagogue (American Politician) as "one who will preach doctrines he knows to be untrue to men he knows to be idiots."

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                  • #10
                    Thanks Snowman!

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
                      ...While in the field I get all the meat and fat off the skin, salt and drain off the fluid twice. ...
                      For a grizzly, how much salt is required each time? How much salt should I take to do the entire bear if I don't come out of woods for 10 days?

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                      • #12
                        Mad Angler,
                        For AK Peninsula brown bear hunts, I take 50 pounds of salt per large bear I expect my clients to kill, which is plenty enough, with some extra, for two saltings.
                        For inland grizzly hunts I have 30 pounds of salt per pelt, which will be enough for two saltings.
                        Get a 50 pound bag of (non-iodized) fine mixing salt at any horse/tack outfit-store. Iodized salt will say it on the bag. Non-iodized will just say Fine Mixing Salt.
                        In the "ol days", your taxidermist would simply give you a 50 pound bag. But at $12.00 per bag in Anchorage, the free-salt-days are over.
                        If you properly flesh, a little salt goes a long ways.
                        As I have said before, spend some time with your preferred taxidermist to get his guidance. Skinning, fleshing, bear paws-lips-noses, salting, aint rocket science. Any job any of us do is more complex. But it just astonishes me to hear hunters, Alaskan hunters, who do not know basic field care procedures when going into remote country. And again, I do not mean for these comments to read as criticism. I do mean for these words to read as "strong urging" to attempt to become more complete outdoorsmen and hunter/killers.

                        Just for contrast, I take only 6/7 pounds of salt for two saltings of a ram shoulder cape.
                        Imagine (It's easy if you try)
                        …miles and miles of mountains…wide expanses of tundra...remote wild waters…
                        (Whisper words of wisdom) Let It Be

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          salt

                          Can you use iodize salt? what will it do to the hide / process?

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Mammoth Hunter View Post
                            Can you use iodize salt? what will it do to the hide / process?
                            The iodine in table salt inhibits penetration of the salt into the hide.
                            Iodized salt will not draw out as mush moisture creating a risk of slippage.
                            Non-iodized salt penetrates the hide much more efficiently, allowing the salt to remove as much moisture as possible.
                            It is also said to cause some yellowing of the hide.

                            Steve
                            "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
                              ...While in the field I get all the meat and fat off the skin, salt and drain off the fluid twice. ...
                              Unless you have the pelt in the abnormally hot-sunny early September weather in SW AK for ten days, and then you salt it three times, right?

                              Originally posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
                              ... when I arrive in Anchorage I like to get pelts and skins immediately to ALFA Fur Dressers, phone # (907) 868-3227. Gary at Alfa Fur will ship the tanned pruduct wherever you want, anywhere in the world. ...
                              Like this guy:




                              Originally posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
                              For AK Peninsula brown bear hunts, I take 50 pounds of salt per large bear I expect my clients to kill, which is plenty enough, with some extra, for two saltings.
                              The extra jugs of salt also are helpful in holding down the tarp on which you skin the bear, right? And the empty plastic jugs burn really well when your bonfire at midnight on a sand bar starts to need a little boost.

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