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  • #31
    This year while hunting on the Yukon we accidently camped on some Native land. No signs around for miles, figured it was federal land but we were wrong. Couple Native guys in a boat approached us one night and explained our situation. Guy told us it was his land, and the land on both sides of the river was all Native owned for several miles each way. He was very kind and told us we were more than welcome to stay and hunt, but recommended we not go to far either direction, as some of the other land owners would not be so tolerant.

    Sure enough, the next night some of his brethern came by in a couple of boats. They were not happy. They were not sober. They were just mad as all hell for us hunting "their" moose on their land and "asked" us to leave. We said "no" we are not.

    We left the next morning. Got as far away as we could and still ended up on Native land (in hindsight checking on it). Didn't stop us from killing a couple of bulls though.

    Should've checked on the area before the hunt, but such is life.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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    • #32
      You were most likely on a Native allotment parcel, not Native corporation land. That makes it private property owned by that person. You could have hunted his land with his permission, but the neighbors sounded like they didn't like it.
      Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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      • #33
        Originally posted by pike_palace View Post
        This year while hunting on the Yukon we accidently camped on some Native land. No signs around for miles, figured it was federal land but we were wrong. Couple Native guys in a boat approached us one night and explained our situation. Guy told us it was his land, and the land on both sides of the river was all Native owned for several miles each way. He was very kind and told us we were more than welcome to stay and hunt, but recommended we not go to far either direction, as some of the other land owners would not be so tolerant.

        Sure enough, the next night some of his brethern came by in a couple of boats. They were not happy. They were not sober. They were just mad as all hell for us hunting "their" moose on their land and "asked" us to leave. We said "no" we are not.

        We left the next morning. Got as far away as we could and still ended up on Native land (in hindsight checking on it). Didn't stop us from killing a couple of bulls though.

        Should've checked on the area before the hunt, but such is life.
        How many of you go hunting/camping/fishing without knowledge of who the property owner is?
        In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
        _________________________________________________

        If I come across as an arrogant, know-it-all jerk, it's because I am

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        • #34
          Can an AK native from another tribe (say Kenai area) hunt on another natives land from up north, or do they need to get a permit as well? How does that work?

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          • #35
            Many so called rent a cops can legaly hold you and thats why they have handcuffs,same with bond collectors in many cases. I've read some real horror stories of folks in Washington getting caught on lumber company land with out permits.I will say I have found if you know the native folks that own the land from every day life you probably will not have problems.If a person just comes to you to borrow money you are not likely to give them much time and asking to hunt is much like that.The kid with the car has the most friends
            Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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            • #36
              I always like throwing my 2 cents in when I know I should'nt.
              Just found on the web, def of the two. The big difference being intent and proving it. Once you have been notified that you're trespassing if your caught again it's Criminal.
              As to restraning, "Arresting, Detaining" a person when your not a LE type person backed by a government I added the last definition.
              Civil Trespass to Land
              • A person may enter another's land, cause a third party to enter another's land, or place an object on another's land. A person may also stay on another's land longer than he has been permitted to stay or fail to remove his possession from another's land at the agreed-upon time.

              Proving Trespass to Land
              • In order for a landowner to prove that a person has trespassed on his land, he must show that the person entered the land on his own volition with the intent to make use of the land without the landowner's permission.


                Criminal Trespass
                • A person knowingly enters or remains unlawfully in a dwelling or premises without the owner's consent, or the person enters or remains in a building or on real property without the owner's consent. The law in most states assumes that a person lacks the owner's consent to enter the owner's property when the owner or someone else has communicated this to the person, of when there is a fence around the property or a sign warning against trespassing that potential intruders can see. Different states have different laws that will be used to determine whether or not a person has trespassed upon another's property. If in doubt, you should consult those laws to find out the definition of and punishments for the crime.


                False imprisonment often involves the use of physical force, but such force is not required. The threat of force or arrest, or a belief on the part of the person being restrained that force will be used, is sufficient. The restraint can also be imposed by physical barriers or through unreasonable duress imposed on the person being restrained.



              HL Mencken, defined a demagogue (American Politician) as "one who will preach doctrines he knows to be untrue to men he knows to be idiots."

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              • #37
                Originally posted by Matt View Post
                Can an AK native from another tribe (say Kenai area) hunt on another natives land from up north, or do they need to get a permit as well? How does that work?
                I have no rights on Doyon, or NANA or any other regional/village corporation. In fact, I need permission from my own corporation to access "my" property. Difference is, I don't have to pay the $1,500 fee to Ahtna if I want to hunt bison on their property, or predators or what have you. I do have to get their permission and have that on my person.

                Every corp is different in terms of process. Ahtna allows non-natives to hunt, granted they go through their process. Doyon will not allow non-native or non doyon shareholders to hunt. Not sure of the others.
                In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
                _________________________________________________

                If I come across as an arrogant, know-it-all jerk, it's because I am

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by tlingitwarrior View Post
                  How many of you go hunting/camping/fishing without knowledge of who the property owner is?
                  Used to do it all the time. Back when this was alaska. Now I usually know who owns the land through experience or the lovely signs that are put up.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by tlingitwarrior View Post
                    How many of you go hunting/camping/fishing without knowledge of who the property owner is?
                    I guess they were too busy getting their free land to put up signs. I've since gotten in touch with the property areas area on the Yukon and will not make the same mistake again.
                    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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                    • #40
                      I would like to inform everybody that I have a lot of prime hunting land with lots of animals on it. I don't have any signs up, but my land and animals are for white people only and I will be ticketing, fining and detaining any natives that I find on it.

                      Sounds absurd in reverse doesn't it?

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                      • #41
                        Originally posted by tyrex13 View Post
                        I would like to inform everybody that I have a lot of prime hunting land with lots of animals on it. I don't have any signs up, but my land and animals are for white people only and I will be ticketing, fining and detaining any natives that I find on it.

                        Sounds absurd in reverse doesn't it?
                        Nothing absurd about it. Its your property, do what you will. Respect the ability of the other property owners to do what they will.
                        In 1492 Native Americans discovered Columbus lost at sea
                        _________________________________________________

                        If I come across as an arrogant, know-it-all jerk, it's because I am

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Originally posted by tyrex13 View Post
                          I would like to inform everybody that I have a lot of prime hunting land with lots of animals on it. I don't have any signs up, but my land and animals are for white people only and I will be ticketing, fining and detaining any natives that I find on it.

                          Sounds absurd in reverse doesn't it?
                          It would sound absurd if that's what was happening. As has been pointed out, hunting these lands isn't restricted to Native Alaskans, it is restricted to corporation shareholders. There are lots of Native Alaskans that are not shareholders of any corporation and thus do not have rights to hunt any Native corporation lands, and as was mentioned, belonging to one corp does not give you rights to hunt other corporations' lands just because you're Native.

                          Again, this is not the thread to discuss whether ANCSA was a good idea or not. The land in question has been legally deeded to these corporations and is thus private land. I'd love to see some changes in the way access across these lands is made available, but my responsibility is to follow the law with regards to private land.

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by J2theD View Post
                            While reading one of the Kodiak Grizzly threads on here it was mentioned that the fine was more than $1300 for tresspassing. I have also heard Ahtna will write you tickets if they catch you trespassing.

                            So my question is...how can they write you a ticket and enforce it? I mean, do I HAVE to show my ID to some Ahtna guy, and can they MAKE me pay it? I know you can get prosecuted, but trespassing is only a misdemeanor, which to me, is well worth $1,300 +. Plus, they have to take you to court which seems like more of a hassle than they would want.

                            I am not trying to instigate or have a negative attitude, I am just curious as to what the "rules and laws" are regarding a native corp. issuing you a ticket or fine.

                            Comments?
                            To Clarify to the ORIGINAL posting, I am fairly sure, the $1300 mentioned is not the fine, but is the cost of access to harvest a Brown Bear on their land.
                            Depending on the area you are looking at, Afognak Corp. or Kodiak road system, Leisnoi Corp.,
                            it may be a different amount charged to hunt on their land for Brown Bear.

                            But that is not the trespassing fine, as you may have read somewhere, but the cost they feel to charge folks for a Bear taken on their land

                            Just in case you were thinking it may be worth 1300 to go ahead on it,

                            if found on their land, Brown Bear down, without a hunting access permit for Brown Bear, it might be a fair bit more ?? Probably not worth pulling that trigger......

                            Could be Just the Example they were looking for, and I'm also fairly sure the Afognak folks do have some access to serious lawyers. Could get ugly to be That Guy
                            Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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                            • #44
                              kodiakrain thanks for the clarification. Your post begs another question: Can a private landowner charge what amounts to a trophy fee for taking a public resource (game animal).

                              Charging a flat rate for access is one thing but charging for access on a sliding scale based on the perceived value of state property is another.
                              If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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                              • #45
                                Ohhh, you got a can of worms going there,...... Very Good Question

                                From my perspective, knowing a few of the Corp. folks locally, and what they are talking about concerning hunting access fees, etc.

                                I don't think they know the answer to that,

                                They're doing it, cause they see the value of a Brown Bear, as much higher than an Elk, and Way Higher than a Blacktail Deer

                                but legally, I wonder if anyone has questioned this yet?
                                So, Is the game animal, found on their land, still a public resource ?

                                It's a fair size discrepancy, $1300 some for Bear, $125 for three Deer,.....Hmmmm

                                (maybe it's, all those Bear hunters arriving with Weatherby Gun Cases ??)
                                Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

                                Comment

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