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  • #16
    Originally posted by wildone View Post
    A 7mm-08 and 120 or 140 barnes is hard to beat for a mountain rig JMHO. Short action non magnum and premium bullets. It saves you weight in the action and barrel no need to go more that a 36 mm objective on glass max. Could never figure out why guys build an ultralight and then throw a hubble telescope on it , kinda defeats the purpose. Something between 5.5 and 6 lbs all up is easy to carry and still balances well when it come time to go to work. The 7 's have sheep and goat written all over em. good luck what ever you decide.
    I thought hard about a 7-08 for my next mountain rifle. The longer I looked the more I realized that it doesn't seem to offer any advantage over the good old 308, in fact there were more drawbacks than advantages when put side by side. Most of the negligable but still... Same spec rifle the 7mm will weigh slightly more, the ammo costs a little more, the range of bullet weights is smaller and lighter while not being any faster, at least according to the load data I found. My hodgdon book puts the 308 tossing 165's at about the same speed that the 7-08 will toss 145's.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by LuJon View Post
      I thought hard about a 7-08 for my next mountain rifle. The longer I looked the more I realized that it doesn't seem to offer any advantage over the good old 308, in fact there were more drawbacks than advantages when put side by side. Most of the negligable but still... Same spec rifle the 7mm will weigh slightly more, the ammo costs a little more, the range of bullet weights is smaller and lighter while not being any faster, at least according to the load data I found. My hodgdon book puts the 308 tossing 165's at about the same speed that the 7-08 will toss 145's.
      That's what I found when doing research, and I ended up with a 308 as well...

      The short magnums are the only other thing I'd consider. The 300 is certainly a solid choice and one I thought about too. I think for a light handy rifle you want to cut ounces as much as possible, so that means short actions. That also implies to me accepting the best acceptable choice with the least recoil. If you think you need to take the longer shots, then by all means, go for the short magnum -- but if not, why not go for something that's going to kick a little less in a lighter rifle with a shorter barrel?

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      • #18
        love the .270 win and the .30-'06 probably more than any other calibers...for personal hunting. most short mags i see are a little lighter than factory long actions..but most fail to take full advantage of the ability to get them as light as possible..
        you can get a .270 win just about as light as a .270 short if you build the gun right...my .416 is 6.5lbs or so...my .270 is about the same, .30-'06 is around 8lbs and i'd give anything (except money... ) to knock about 2lbs off of it...
        Www.blackriverhunting.com
        Master guide 212

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        • #19
          Originally posted by BRWNBR View Post
          my .416 is 6.5lbs or so...
          I knew there was a reason I hoped we didn't see anything for me to shoot with your rifle on the goat hunt.

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          • #20
            ya i remember you sayin' that several times over while you had it....
            Www.blackriverhunting.com
            Master guide 212

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            • #21
              .260 remington

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              • #22
                Jake, do you walk in circles because one shoulder is set farther back than the other?

                6.5lb .416 :shot:

                ouch

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                • #23
                  .30-06 has always been a great caliber for me. Got a .300 wsm for x-mas and excited to give it a try for moose, bou and bear. For deer and sheep, I like the .25-06 and .270 wsm (fast, flat and accurate).

                  BUT, you are going to be on Kodiak, where there are some slightly larger bears. I think the .300wsm with 165 or 180 grain barnes X would be a great choice for your trip.

                  Please put a good optic on it as well with not to much magnification; you can't kill what you can't see.

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                  • #24
                    My "go to" rifle is a stainless model 7 in 284 winchester. When I was going to rebarrel the m7(it started as a 243) I wanted a cartridge with some reach, some power, good selection of bullets and it had to fit the short action. So the 284 winchester was a perfect fit. It took me a lot of work but when it was finished it weighs in at 5.5lbs with 22" barrel, talleys, 6x36 leupold, butler creek flip ups, and sling. I've been using it for 8 yrs now and have taken stones, goats, caribou, elk, and lots of deer without any issues or need for anything more powerful. I've tried lots of different bullets but I have settled on hornady 154gr interlock for everything at about 2880fps.

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                    • #25
                      Don't chime in much but since mod7rem mentioned the .284, I thought I would say that is my go to rifle. Love my .270 but the .284 ULA is almost 2 pounds lighter. I load 140 grain NPs at 3000 fps and have taken many sheep, goat and one grizzly with it.

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by kloshe View Post
                        My vote goes to the 300wsm for a mountain rifle. it won't do anything a 300winmag can't, but it does do it in a shorter barrel, smaller action, and therefore a lighter rifle. I also think any rifle carried should give a hunter a level of comfort against bear troubles, which a 300wsm does with a good bullet.
                        Your reasoning is Interesting.

                        Do you think that a 300 WM, with as short a barrel, and loaded to the same pressure level, won't do as well?

                        Won't, 300 Magnums would do better with a longer barrel, whether they're crowded into a short action or not?

                        Is there a practical advantage of having smaller action, when the difference in weight and bolt throw are so slight?

                        A 300 Magnum would be my LAST choice for a "Mountain"/(lightweight) rifle. With that kind of recoil, a heavier gun with a longer barrel is indicated.

                        The WSM version reely doesn't change anything, but perception. It's jist a nother 300 Mag. with more downsides than ups.

                        Smitty of the North
                        Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
                        Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
                        You can't out-give God.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by icb12 View Post
                          .260 remington
                          That sounds good to me, or a 6.5x55.

                          I choose 7x57 or 7mm-08, but that's cause 7mm is my Caliber.

                          With heavy for caliber bullets, these cartridges have proven to be, reliable dispatchers of all North American Beeg Game, and more.

                          Smitty of the North
                          Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
                          Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
                          You can't out-give God.

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                          • #28
                            The 6.5, .7mm and .308 calibers seem to be very popular calibers for punching holes in live and paper targets at great distances. The choice of bullets is huge and charts are available that show you all the ballistics. So it just depends on how much power you want. Then you have to decide on the rifle and scope combo that best suits the caliber. Our military is very fond of the .308 caliber and the .308 Winchester case. Many bench rest shooters use it and some version of the 6.5 caliber. The 7mm caliber is used for much of the long range shooting on the Best of The West show. What ever you choose just remember your critter deserves to be shot with a decent hunting bullet.

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by LuJon View Post
                              I thought hard about a 7-08 for my next mountain rifle. The longer I looked the more I realized that it doesn't seem to offer any advantage over the good old 308, in fact there were more drawbacks than advantages when put side by side. Most of the negligable but still... Same spec rifle the 7mm will weigh slightly more, the ammo costs a little more, the range of bullet weights is smaller and lighter while not being any faster, at least according to the load data I found. My hodgdon book puts the 308 tossing 165's at about the same speed that the 7-08 will toss 145's.
                              Here are some numbers to ponder. I tried to keep things true to your example and as apples-to-apples as possible - same bullet manufacturer & type, loading data from the same company (highest I could find), etc. Velocities are from Hodgdon's online loading data, and calculations via JBM's online ballistics calculator.

                              7mm-08 - 139gr Hornady Interbond (.486 BC, 2900fps)
                              .308 Win - 165gr Hornady Interbond (.447 BC, 2775fps)


                              Drop at 500 yards:
                              7mm-08 - 49.5 inches
                              .308 Win - 56.7 inches

                              Wind drift at 500 yards:
                              7mm-08 - 18.7 inches
                              .308 Win - 22.0 inches

                              Energy at 500 yards for both is vitually the same, at 1200 ft-lbs & change. At 500 yards, the 7mm-08 does the same job with less drop and drift, and beyond 500 yards, it gets even uglier for the .308. At 800 yards, the .308's projectile drops 30" more than the 7mm-08's, and has another 10 inches of wind drift. The 7mm-08's projectile is also moving faster and has more energy at 800yds than the one fired from the .308 Win.

                              What does this mean to the real world hunter? That's up to the individual hunter to decide, but launching higher-BC projectiles at faster velocities is a good thing, and the 7mm-08 simply does a better job - especially for the handloader. The .308 Win is probably a better choice for folks shooting factory ammo, though, since there is a lot more variety of factory loaded .308 ammo to choose from.

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                              • #30
                                I see what you are saying in that instance but honestly if I wanted to shoot animals at that distance I would look at a 7mm mag vs 300 win mag comparison.

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