Koyukuk Adventure 2010

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  • rambling raven
    replied
    The boat underwent the change to a hard top 3 years ago. We spent the night about 25 miles up stream from you. Hadn't been that far up that particular creek before. Went up late and came out early. We didn't see anyone else up there at the time but back on the main river the camps were starting to stack up. Glad your wife was able to get a nice one - sounds like she had a good season. How did you enjoy the bugs?
    Originally posted by GAredneck View Post
    RR,

    We did see you pull in the slough but I didn't recognize the camo on the boat. I was looking for the maroon color top like in your profile photos. We were perched up on the high bank about a 1/4 mile above camp when you came by really slow, if I'd know it was you I'd walked down to the waters edge to say hello. All in all we had a great hunt also, the wife got a good bull and I passed up some small ones trying to get he really big boy but no luck, the weather was just too hot during the day. We ended up pulling out 3 1/2 days early so we wouldn't loose the meat from the wife bull.

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  • MARV1
    replied
    Nice, drove from Nenana down to here a little over 3 years ago while working. Lugged along at 9-11mph and the scenery was awesome and your pic's bring back memories. I want to do it again, this time with my family.
    And yes, bone on the meat is best, calcium and minerals when you cook it.

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  • tboehm
    replied
    You are to congradulated on a wonderful and successful trip. Loved the pictures and thanks for taking the time to share with the rest of us who didn't get to go.

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  • rambling raven
    replied
    Originally posted by broncoformudv View Post
    Congrats on a great hunt!! Hopefully you get the big guy the next time around!
    I probably had my share of the big ones in years past and I wouldn't want to press my luck by passing one up. When I can get my daughter out of school long enough to take her down there I would like to try and find her a big one.

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  • broncoformudv
    replied
    Congrats on a great hunt!! Hopefully you get the big guy the next time around!

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  • GAredneck
    replied
    RR,

    We did see you pull in the slough but I didn't recognize the camo on the boat. I was looking for the maroon color top like in your profile photos. We were perched up on the high bank about a 1/4 mile above camp when you came by really slow, if I'd know it was you I'd walked down to the waters edge to say hello. All in all we had a great hunt also, the wife got a good bull and I passed up some small ones trying to get he really big boy but no luck, the weather was just too hot during the day. We ended up pulling out 3 1/2 days early so we wouldn't loose the meat from the wife bull.

    Leave a comment:


  • rambling raven
    replied
    Originally posted by bushrat View Post
    RR, great post and pics, you guys really covered the country. I haven't seen anyone cut up a moose that way either, and with the hide still on. Care to offer any insight on that, the pros and cons of doing it that way and if you used a sawzall or something?

    Congrats to you both, good meat for this winter.
    Hello Mark,
    Thanks for the comments. I am a fanatic about the meat care. I prefer to leave all the meat on the bones when I butcher as I enjoy the bone in cuts and there is less waste. Both of these bulls were small enough to quarter and still handle the 4 pieces. We use a "Wyoming" type hand saw and simply cut the moose in 1/2 and then split the spine down the middle. As long as the blade is sharp it is a pretty easy task for 2 people, Little tougher if you are alone. It makes for a quick and clean butcher job as well. I like to leave the hide on until I get it hung, simply because it keeps the meat clean and dry. As soon as I can hang it and get a tarp above it the hide comes off, ideally in the first hour but each one can be different, if packing is involved the hide comes off sooner to lighten the load. Our second bull was in the dark, on the sand, very windy, and then the rain came. We had the head off, guts out, briskett split, all blood out of the cavitiy, ribs cleaned with vinegar, and a tarp over it in the first 45 minutes. The wind was howling so it was plenty cool to leave the hide on till early in the morning when conditions were better to assure the meat stayed clean and dry.

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  • bushrat
    replied
    RR, great post and pics, you guys really covered the country. I haven't seen anyone cut up a moose that way either, and with the hide still on. Care to offer any insight on that, the pros and cons of doing it that way and if you used a sawzall or something?

    Congrats to you both, good meat for this winter.

    Leave a comment:


  • skybust
    replied
    Great story congrat on the moose.

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  • ducks n' dogs
    replied
    WOW! Sounds like quite a trip... looks like you've got the right rig for the job, Nice Boat.


    would have been nice to get a big one but who can resist when all that tasty, high protein, low fat, goodness walks right into your sights (I have the same problem). Made moose tacos last night and realized how low on moose I'm getting have to wait till next year I suppose...

    great photos as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • alaskachallenge@yahoo.com
    replied
    5 bulls after you left steve

    Click image for larger version

Name:	sjx.jpg
Views:	3
Size:	84.1 KB
ID:	2475038hi steve,ended up getting 5 after you 2 left,mine was 63,58,56.5,56,48,,in 4 days
    Attached Files

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  • Jerod
    replied
    Thanks guys. I'll post other questions later if I'm lucky enough to draw the tag. I don't want to end up highjacking this thread. I appreciate the info though!

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  • martentrapper
    replied
    Starting at Manley means you have to get thru "squaw crossing". Can be pretty tricky if it's a dry year.

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  • stid2677
    replied
    Originally posted by Jerod View Post
    I'm presuming that is 100 total miles cut (50 miles each way)?

    Did you log your travel speed, gallons, and GPH? I've tried putting the numbers together, and it looks like at the 1000 miles, 25mph average at 10gph (conservatively) would be 400 gallons of gas. I figure I can comfortably carry 160 gallons on board, so I'd have to fill up at least twice along the way. I'd be doing the trip in my 20' Predator with the 200 optimax.
    Jerod, Tim and I used his Extreme Shallow with the 200.

    Our moving avg was about 21 mph and about 12 GPH avg. We burnt about 550 gals and almost 11 gals of oil. We left Galena with 195 gallons on deck and that was really only enough for one tank hunting. A heavy jet boat burns a lot of fuel, way more than when empty.
    Another tip I would offer is seek out shallow water, we could only get up to 18mph loaded in deep water, we could get up to 27mph or so running right next to the shore using "ground effect to push the boat up on step".

    Steve

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  • Jerod
    replied
    Originally posted by rambling raven View Post
    Launching at Manley cuts 100 miles off the trip. With the price of fuel and the poor mileage of the boat it has been worth it for us.
    I'm presuming that is 100 total miles cut (50 miles each way)?

    Did you log your travel speed, gallons, and GPH? I've tried putting the numbers together, and it looks like at the 1000 miles, 25mph average at 10gph (conservatively) would be 400 gallons of gas. I figure I can comfortably carry 160 gallons on board, so I'd have to fill up at least twice along the way. I'd be doing the trip in my 20' Predator with the 200 optimax.

    Leave a comment:

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