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Keeping brownies off the bait?

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  • Keeping brownies off the bait?

    Hey all,

    I'm baiting in a new area this year, and lots of folks out here have told me they have problems with grizzlies getting in their bait piles (obviously meant for blacks). I've heard a few vague tips, but though I'd ask the experts. So, any suggestions? (Other than the obvious "lots of flying lead seems to do the trick!")

    Thanks for helping out!

  • #2
    brown on bait

    I havent found a solution yet, I really dont think there is any way to avoid them from going to it. I have however noticed by evidence of my trail camera,that towards the last week of may the first week of june or so, the browns seem to move on, and concentrate on other things, moose calves maybe? I dont know. There are always a few that will continue to hit it, but the black population seems to get higher, and the brown lower the later into the season it gets. I have tried all different kinds of things to no avail. I think we just have to deal with them.

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    • #3
      when i get hit hard by Grizz,, i stop baiting it... until they move off.. but it will be back next year.. I have one that comes in EVERY year smae day or so... with in 12-18 hours of the first date time i seen him on camera... they REMEMBER where a meal was found. they will sit on it until empty or they are pushed off by bigger bears.
      "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

      meet on face book here

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      • #4
        Protein?

        A good friend of mine has been baiting for several years and he says that brown bears are looking for protein when they come out of hibernation. They go off insearch of winter kills and such. He told me that they love dog food because it provides them w/ the protein they are wanting. Therefore, he only baits w/ pasteries, bread, sugar, frosting. He said that he will have an ocassional brown to come by but they quickly move on. I dont know if this is true, but he and his friends harvest 5-6 bears off the same tree stand for the past several years.

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        • #5
          bears

          I dont think they are too choosy or picky as to what they eat, if there is a pile of human food or dog food that is there, free and easily attainable they are going to eat it, and continue to eat it until its no longer there for them. I have had brown bears camp out at my bait station for weeks keeping blacks out until I just quit baiting it. Then they move on. But all bears and situations are different.

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          • #6
            Do not use meat or fish products. That won't guarantee you won't get browns, but using meat or fish will darn near guarantee that you will get them on your site.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Brian M View Post
              Do not use meat or fish products. That won't guarantee you won't get browns, but using meat or fish will darn near guarantee that you will get them on your site.
              What Brian said...
              Vance in AK.

              Matthew 6:33
              "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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              • #8
                Thanks for all the help guys. I was already gonna just rely on jello, karo syrup and stuff, and maybe if I keep it 15' up between two trees (with some holes in the bucket for drippings) the brown ones won't get at it and will just move on. Guess I won't put in my tree-stand tree though!

                Thanks again, I'll see how it works!

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                • #9
                  The area were I have been baiting in the interior. We wait until after the first week in may to put out baits. It seems like the grizz coming out of the dens seem to move through first to get to the lower flats to dig for roots. By no means are you going to avoid them all together. But for the last 6yrs we have had much less problem with the grizz. I would have to agree with the rest of you that if you get a grizz on the bait you will have to starve him out to get him to move on.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by AmagukG View Post
                    Thanks for all the help guys. I was already gonna just rely on jello, karo syrup and stuff, and maybe if I keep it 15' up between two trees (with some holes in the bucket for drippings) the brown ones won't get at it and will just move on. Guess I won't put in my tree-stand tree though!

                    Thanks again, I'll see how it works!

                    NOt sure that will stop one either... LOL


                    last year i winched a 15 gallon fuel drum up the tree to get them to leave my gas alone... they dug up the tree... i swear all you need to bait bears is a plastic jug of some sort; they know, you will need again..
                    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

                    meet on face book here

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                    • #11
                      Yes brian I totaly agree, I never had a brown one hang on a pile of donuts. I start collections at thanksgiving and have friends save them till I stop and pick them up. By this time of year I have a whole freezer full of sweet stuff, and the blackies LOVE ME while the guys not to far away can't get rid of the griz. Besides I'd rather eat one from a pile of donuts than dog food. And there IS something about plastic them bears have a fasination with, that is for sure.
                      Visions Steel/841-WELD(9353)
                      "Rebellion is in my blood, I was born an American"
                      Μολών λαβέ

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                      • #12
                        Note that if you have syrup, jello, or other such liquids dripping on the ground that you will be required by law to remove the contaminated dirt at the end of the baiting season. Liquids can be good, but they're required to be removed along with all other bait when you're done. I don't know that it's worth the extra effort to intentionally drip something on the ground.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by AmagukG View Post
                          Hey all,

                          I'm baiting in a new area this year, and lots of folks out here have told me they have problems with grizzlies getting in their bait piles (obviously meant for blacks). I've heard a few vague tips, but though I'd ask the experts. So, any suggestions? (Other than the obvious "lots of flying lead seems to do the trick!")

                          Thanks for helping out!
                          You need to catch them in the act and run over to them and scold them! Bad Bear! Get away from my barrel of free snacks!

                          Seriously, take advantage of the scenery for now, when you've had enough, remove the bait (leave no-trace) and hope they come back for harvest...
                          Respect what you do not own but are privleged to enjoy, Mother Earth thanks you...

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Grizz problems

                            I haven't been baiting very long....only 4 seasons, and have grizz show up every year. I have noticed if I leave a sweaty shirt at the bait site, the grizz will stop coming in, and I have not noticed a decrease in black bear. Another friend of mine has 2 bait stations, and he had grizz hitting one so he tried peeing next to the bait and the grizz didn't show back up for almost 2 weeks, and surprizingly the black bears didn't seem to mind at all.

                            Something to try. Good luck.

                            CubeCove

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                            • #15
                              Barrel

                              I have seen tons of bait sites and some in heavy brown bear country. If you have a large hole in your barrel and a brownie can reach in and grab everything, then they will stay and eat it all. If you use a 20-30 gallon barrel and cut smaller holes that a bear has to move around to shake the dog food and whatever your using out, I have found that a brownie doesn't like the idea of working too hard for the small reward. This isn't foolproof, but does work.
                              You also don't need a huge pile of bait. You might want to bait heavy at first to get your site noticed, but once it gets hit, go to the barrel with smaller holes. Its kind of cool to watch a black bear kick a smaller barrel around like a salt shaker. I have also been able to hear the barrel being moved around when I was walking into the site.
                              I have seen guys use dog food with syrup and horse feed be highly successful over the guys who put a half ton of old bread, donuts, gallons of grease and oil.
                              Just my .02.

                              Comment

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