Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OPTICS DELIEMA for sheep hunt

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • OPTICS DELIEMA for sheep hunt

    Okay so I know I have some good glass for my sheep hunt but I keep tripping over which set to bring. I could lug my 8x42 leica geovids around or use my leica range finder and Swarovski 10x25's. the geovids are 32 oz and the swaro's are 7.6 and the range finder is 10 oz. so I could lug around 17.6 oz for light weight or pack all in one package bino's/range finder and have lots of eye relief and light gathering but heavy. I'm packing my leica 62 spotter so I was thinking I could look on the mountain with the swaro's and look through the spotter for trophy size. Any advice or suggestions, thanks for any help.

  • #2
    I would not take a range finder if I was worried about weight you did not say if you were bow hunting I assume you are rifle hunting. I take the best, highest magnification glass I had. I have never had a problem with light gathering sheep hunting.

    My main issue is looking extremely long distances with wind causing problems. Nothing like saving 3 miles and 3000 feet of vertical because I can tell the ram on the other side of the valley is a 3/4 curl.
    Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming-----WOW-----what a ride!
    Unknown author

    Comment


    • #3
      Yes deffintly rifle hunting, maybe once i have one under my belt ill try with stick and string. The 10x25 swaro's have more magnifcation, but the 8x42's i think i could look through longer and have a wider field of view. Even though they're 10x25's i should take them because they have more magnifcation but smaller objective ? I mean even the swaro EL's still weight 27 oz, so only 5 more Oz and i would have a range finder too.

      Comment


      • #4
        Not even a doubt.

        Take the geovids and don't look back.
        Once you miss a ram by mis-judging distance over a canyon, etc, you'll never sheep hunt without a range-finder again.
        The Leica glass is excellent and you may need that larger low light objective.

        My 10X42 geovids have earned their weight in sheep horns....
        Proud to be an American!

        Comment


        • #5
          Good deal, if your happy i'll probally be happy with mine too. I was going to bring a range finder either way. The geovids are 8x, do you think the 10x has an advantage? i know the 8x are bigger field of view but i hear the 10x are better for trophy judging. Personally i have always used 10x and loved them but the price i got my geovids for i couldnt pass them up @ 1400$ like new condition. I love the clairty of the glass though, tough to beat the top 3.

          Comment


          • #6
            I've got the 10x28 swaro and 1200 cfr and love the fact that I can crawl around with each in a shirt pocket like they are not there at all but you do give up the low light.

            With the spotter do you really prefer a larger objective bino that is hanging off your neck also?

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by goosepilot View Post
              I've got the 10x28 swaro and 1200 cfr and love the fact that I can crawl around with each in a shirt pocket like they are not there at all but you do give up the low light.

              With the spotter do you really prefer a larger objective bino that is hanging off your neck also?

              True, Goose. For me it's just less "stuff" in my pack. Seems like geovids are made for the sheep and goat hunter.
              Just my two pennies.

              Doog, the 8x geovid will do just fine as opposed to the 10x. Your spotter will pick up the slack.
              Proud to be an American!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by fullkurl View Post
                Doog, the 8x geovid will do just fine as opposed to the 10x. Your spotter will pick up the slack.

                AMEN! I wish a few of my hunting pardners would realize this!
                Know guns. Know peace. Know safety.

                No guns: no peace. No safety!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Think Light...both weight and "not-dark"

                  So you will have the great glass (spotting scope) for the long range views. Regardless of bino power, I suggest taking whatever weighs the least.

                  Note that if your sheep hunt is early season, there will be a bunch of daylight hours. Around Aug 10th it is tough to be up hunting early at first light and then remain out really hunting until sundown. Frankly, most times i get out of camp an hour later than I expect, and I prefer to be past the last significant water crossing before dark-thirty. So I would not be concerned at all about the light gathering capacity of your binoculars, regardless of the power.

                  Most all of my ram kills have been mid-day stalk-and-kill type deals. A few have been towards evening after being pinned down for most of the day, but out of rifle range. Which means another night on the mountain, next to a dead ram, doing jumping jacks to stay warm until sun-up.

                  Dennis
                  Alaska True Adventure Guide Service
                  Imagine (It's easy if you try)
                  …miles and miles of mountains…wide expanses of tundra...remote wild waters…
                  (Whisper words of wisdom) Let It Be

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Yes i thinks its good glass, leica 62 televid. Ahh the decisions, i just weighed my pack and for ten days of hunting and a rediculous 8 LBS of water im at 48 LBS. Weight is crucial but even with the geovids im at 48 LBS . I think thats a good weight for a pack. the difference between the geovids and the swaro combo is 17 OZ. I still like to hear oppions and thanks for all the advice already. I deffintly like to listing to people who have been there done that. If im lucky I'll have full curls and a big smile in AUG.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Pack weight good

                      Does that include 10 days of food? If it does, good job. AlaskaTrue said it all, weight is the issue. Beside that, whatever happened to the age-old skill of range finding with your eyes without electronics. Too many don't do it or never learned it in the first place. Stuff quits or breaks now and then so where are you then? Saving weight. I really don't have any quarrel with using one, just learn to not use one as well. Me, never bought one. My partner and I use a Leupold 12-40X60 and a pair each of 10X25 Zeiss between us. We then put a little extra weight into a decent tripod that doesn't wiggle too much in the wind. There's a lot more, but that's it on this subject.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
                        Frankly, most times i get out of camp an hour later than I expect,


                        Which means another night on the mountain, next to a dead ram, doing jumping jacks to stay warm until sun-up.
                        Glad I'm not the only one who drags his feet in the morning getting going!

                        Last year we killed our rams at about 3pm and were back in camp at 3am. That is one nice thing about early season Brooks Range hunts - plenty of light for packing at night.
                        sigpic

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          big guy

                          CHISANA....AND AS I REMEMBER THE PICTURE, THAT WAS A BEAUTIFUL BIG RAM....3AM walk back to camp. Nothing is better than a walk back to camp with a big ram (or any legal ram) on your back.
                          dennis
                          Imagine (It's easy if you try)
                          …miles and miles of mountains…wide expanses of tundra...remote wild waters…
                          (Whisper words of wisdom) Let It Be

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I sure hope I can have a sheep down smile too! I grew up without a range finder and can guess pretty decent if all else fails, but knowing exactly the distance is defiantly not a bad thing. Yes that’s ten days of food too @ 48 LBS with 8 LBS of water. Freeze dried delights, emergency ration, and wilderness athlete bars/powder. I heard water was key but could defiantly put less water if I know water is available. I bought all my gear ultra light or as close to it. The reason I bought the kifaru pack over the barny's was to save 2-3 lbs, but thats a whole nother forum post. . 2-3 lbs here and there makes a huge difference.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Fresh sheep ribs

                              The 3 AM smile can only be trumped by that contented feeling you get after a long day, lots of miles behind you headed for base camp or the truck, when you've finally taken your boots off, your feet have cooled off in the nearby cold trickle and then dried, that 100+ pound pack full of sheep meat and horns is hung for the night, and you take that first bite of fresh ribs that have been roasting over the fire you made when you hit timberline. The next sound you might hear are your eyes slamming shut before your head hits the pillow, so-to-speak. I know how much it hurts to read this with sheep season almost 4 months away, but it's better than staring all winter in the face!

                              "The disease that is sheep hunting is not to be understood by all. Most will never "get it" for the price of admission is too high to bear."

                              Comment

                              Footer Adsense

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X