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  • Penninsula brownie sightings

    I have a tag and my first week hunt was cut short do to avalanches, so any help on sightings of brownies on the penninsula would be much appreciated.

  • #2
    Why dont you just go back in for that booner. You had the right area.

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    • #3
      Please explain about the Avalanches.........?
      "Life Is Either a Daring Adventure or Nothing" - Helen Keller

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Hopeak View Post
        Please explain about the Avalanches.........?

        avalanche |ˈavəˌlan ch |
        noun
        a mass of snow, ice, and rocks falling rapidly down a mountainside.
        • a large mass of any material moving rapidly downhill : an avalanche of mud.
        • figurative a sudden arrival or occurrence of something in overwhelming quantities : we have had an avalanche of applications.
        • Physics a cumulative process in which a fast-moving ion or electron generates further ions and electrons by collision.
        verb [ intrans. ]
        (of a mass of snow, ice, and rocks) descend rapidly down a mountainside.
        • [ trans. ] (usu. be avalanched) engulf or carry off by such a mass of material : the climbers were avalanched down the south face of the mountain.
        • [ intrans. ] Physics undergo a rapid increase in conductivity due to an avalanche process.
        ORIGIN late 18th cent.: from French, alteration of the Alpine dialect word lavanche (of unknown origin), influenced by avaler ‘descend’ ; compare with Italian valanga.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Git-r-done View Post
          avalanche |ˈavəˌlan ch |
          noun
          a mass of snow, ice, and rocks falling rapidly down a mountainside.
          • a large mass of any material moving rapidly downhill : an avalanche of mud.
          • figurative a sudden arrival or occurrence of something in overwhelming quantities : we have had an avalanche of applications.
          • Physics a cumulative process in which a fast-moving ion or electron generates further ions and electrons by collision.
          verb [ intrans. ]
          (of a mass of snow, ice, and rocks) descend rapidly down a mountainside.
          • [ trans. ] (usu. be avalanched) engulf or carry off by such a mass of material : the climbers were avalanched down the south face of the mountain.
          • [ intrans. ] Physics undergo a rapid increase in conductivity due to an avalanche process.
          ORIGIN late 18th cent.: from French, alteration of the Alpine dialect word lavanche (of unknown origin), influenced by avaler ‘descend’ ; compare with Italian valanga.
          That was sp wrong, but it made me laugh. Best explaination Ive ever read.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Daniel in Ak View Post
            That was sp wrong, but it made me laugh. Best explaination Ive ever read.
            And the reason this would terminate a Hunt is.........What??????
            "Life Is Either a Daring Adventure or Nothing" - Helen Keller

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Hopeak View Post
              And the reason this would terminate a Hunt is.........What??????
              Just guessing here, but perhaps because he didn't want to die. A lot of spring bear hunting, as you're aware, is done in the mountains on slopes that can be avalanche-prone given the correct conditions. We've been in the midst of some pretty serious avalanche cycles in recent weeks, particularly in the Kenai Mountains. I'm guessing the guy assessed the danger, his own avalanche knowledge, and made a decision based upon the risk. Good on him. Avalanche fatalities are totally preventable, and the bears will still be there next week.

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              • #8
                I would have to guess that the highway being closed would have more to do with it then anything... kind of hard to hunt if you can't get there...
                "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

                meet on face book here

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Brian M View Post
                  Just guessing here, but perhaps because he didn't want to die. A lot of spring bear hunting, as you're aware, is done in the mountains on slopes that can be avalanche-prone given the correct conditions. We've been in the midst of some pretty serious avalanche cycles in recent weeks, particularly in the Kenai Mountains. I'm guessing the guy assessed the danger, his own avalanche knowledge, and made a decision based upon the risk. Good on him. Avalanche fatalities are totally preventable, and the bears will still be there next week.

                  I live in the Kenai Mountains, I Ski-Doodle, hike and/or snowshoe everyday. Avalanche danger is reason of caution, yes. But this time of year I fine the bears will come straight down to the valley floor. I would be inclined to glass the the hillsides, from the safety of the floor, and let the bear more or less come to me, buy carefully moving to a point of interception.
                  "Life Is Either a Daring Adventure or Nothing" - Helen Keller

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                  • #10
                    Not all bears come right down once they first emerge from the den. Some poke their head out then go right back inside, some come out and might hang out for up to a week, sometimes longer. He did the right thing by not going, his life is not worth losing opver a bear.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by AkHunter45 View Post
                      Not all bears come right down once they first emerge from the den. Some poke their head out then go right back inside, some come out and might hang out for up to a week, sometimes longer. He did the right thing by not going, his life is not worth losing opver a bear.
                      Yes, I have three dens behind my cabin on the mountain, and at times they are out in the middle for the winter for a day or two. My point is there is no food up there, and once they depart the den, they more or less come down. My understanding was that he went, and came back early for a reason having to do with the avalanches. My point is you can and often times have to work around the avalanche danger.
                      "Life Is Either a Daring Adventure or Nothing" - Helen Keller

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Vince View Post
                        I would have to guess that the highway being closed would have more to do with it then anything... kind of hard to hunt if you can't get there...
                        Good point, Vince. The road was closed for a time heading south last week.

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                        • #13
                          back on point

                          I did make it out there and stayed two and saw a couple avalanches come down and since I was by myself and if for whatever reason I did end up in the bottom of an avalanche I would have been there for a week before any I e would have decided to come look for me. So I came backs when I did and then the big storm hit the pass making it hard to get back down after dropping the sled. I will be going back down every work weekend until I get one. But back on point I am looking for sightings so I can determine which area I have the best chance of on a two day hunt.

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                          • #14
                            permit area?

                            Just s small point of information required...what tag did you get and/or for which area of the Kenai? This could help with people's efforts to keep you apprised? Just a thought...

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                            • #15
                              Avalanches and big bears

                              They sure are wonderful, both the spring avalanches and the emerging bears. They, the avalanches, will be coming down until late May. That will cut into the spring bear season if a hunter waits until summer. Simply stay out of the avalance chutes as much as possible. Seen hundreds, probably thousands of 'em....avalanches and bears. You can hear 'em, the avalanches, coming usually long before you see 'em. When the sun starts really warming up the mountainsides you might see a hundred avalanches a day, and any day that you are hunting you might see that one big bear. Sounds like your desire to be warm and social exceeded your desire to kill a big bear. Now go back out and hunt.

                              dennis
                              Imagine (It's easy if you try)
                              …miles and miles of mountains…wide expanses of tundra...remote wild waters…
                              (Whisper words of wisdom) Let It Be

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