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  • Wary

    OK, there has been some talk of wariness on the part of Alaskan animals so I thought this might be in order.

    Which Alaskan animal (in your opinion) is the most wary? This should make it fairly challenging to hunt.

    BTW, since this is your opinion, there are no wrong answers and other hunters who post should not say you are wrong. Hopefully that will keep this thread pretty civil.

    As a non-resident, I don't hunt anything that requires being guided. Of those left, I guess I would have to go with the blacktail. While (IMO) no Alaskan animal that I have ever hunted is very wary, the blacktail is pretty careful about showing itself to predators. This applies only to the early season. I have been told that blacktails are pretty easy to hunt late in the fall.

    Taking that into consideration, I would have to say that NO Alaska animal that I have hunted is very wary (caribou, moose, black bear, blacktail).

    I also have never hunted any suburban animals so that opens up an entire new catagory.
    Last edited by Phil; 04-09-2009, 04:48. Reason: grammar

  • #2
    Wary

    Wary is a subjective term. You'd have us believe turkeys are super wary and yet I've turned a coon dog into them which send's them straight for a tree. At which point you can walk right under them and shoot as many as you can carry right in the arse. Shooting from bellow ruins no meat!
    In this case I was the wary one as this cannot be performed just anywhere.
    Hopefully someday your own Hillary will find herself up a tree!
    Mike

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    • #3
      of them all up here? would be the wolf. that is the one RARLEY seen..
      "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

      meet on face book here

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      • #4
        1.Wolverine
        2. Wolf
        3. Lynx
        4. Sheep

        The other end of the spectrum...I have a feeling Musk Ox may be worse but I haven't seen anything as unwary as a black bear in a berry patch.

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        • #5
          Wolf and Interior Grizzly are even, and they could not be considered "wary", when compared to a Whitetail Deer.
          NONE of the other animals are the least bit wary in any way. They are very easily stalked or called.
          "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
          ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

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          • #6
            Mmmmm

            Strangly, I agree mostly with Akres.
            Wolf are #1 in this catagory.
            All, but wolf are routinely "stalkable".

            Also, your whitetails are "wary", but absolutely, clearly the easiest game animal to pattern....on earth.

            Dennis
            AK TAGS

            because...WE TOLD YOU SO.
            Imagine (It's easy if you try)
            …miles and miles of mountains…wide expanses of tundra...remote wild waters…
            (Whisper words of wisdom) Let It Be

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            • #7
              An old brown bear. One that is at least 6-7 years old.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
                Strangly, I agree mostly with Akres.
                Wolf are #1 in this catagory.
                All, but wolf are routinely "stalkable".

                Also, your whitetails are "wary", but absolutely, clearly the easiest game animal to pattern....on earth.

                Dennis
                AK TAGS

                because...WE TOLD YOU SO.
                They are only easy to pattern where there are lots of them. I have hunted quite a bit in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan and parts of Northern Wisconsin where the densities are very low...and that pattern may mean that twice a week they pass the area that you put your stand in....that's a lot of squirrel watching and book reading my fellow outdoorsmen. (granted it's a nice place to do such things) And to cover ground to find them does little good since they are wary....so yes, in areas of high concentration...you could run out of bullets 5 days a week and set your watch to when they come out, but you drop those numbers to Alaska densities...you had better be one savvy hunter (which time has proven I just may not be). Also, if you give up the treestand and the cornpile...things get a whole lot more interesting using groundblinds and stillhunting with a bow.

                I'd vote for the wolf here too, I've gotten the drop on everything else pretty easily. Haven't chased Dall's but I hear that unless highly pressured it's more about beating the mountain than it is beating them.

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                • #9
                  for me

                  Since most wolves and wolverine that are taken while hunting are "incidental" I would say dall sheep that have been "hunted" hard way be the most wary of all. I do know some brownies that have been hunted hard that are also right up there. Those old brownies that tend to get "nocturnal" are very hard to harvest. Seems to me that any creature that has been hunted before and pushed, has learned how to "avoid" the hunter. I have found some sheep that will spook at the sight of anything "odd" and these guys will not stop for a minimum of 5 miles until they are on another mountain. The are "wary" but not untouchable.

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                  • #10
                    sheep

                    I feel sheep are easy to hunt and kill. I have said this many times. I base this on the fact that I have been in on 27 ram kills, more than any other Alaskan big game species other that caribou.

                    The country they live in can be rough and tough. The country will test ones fitness and emotional committment. But rams die easy when hit properly. Of course they can see forever, but they can, sometimes, also be surprisingly accepting of a hunter who moves very slow. I would not rate them as being especiallly wary, based on my 29 stalks and 27 kills.

                    Our man Northway has been in on at least 30 ram kills, possible many more.
                    And Ill also agree with Northway that sheep that have been pressured are hard to hunt and will not be accepting of anything that does not look comfortable to them. Still, I feel the rough country they seek refuge in (after being pressured) is the biggest problem to overcome.

                    Dennis
                    AK TAGS
                    Imagine (It's easy if you try)
                    …miles and miles of mountains…wide expanses of tundra...remote wild waters…
                    (Whisper words of wisdom) Let It Be

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      27 for 29, I want to hunt with you! Seriously thats impressive. Can't comment on AK's toughest. But in regards to Whitetails I think it has gotten pretty easy with all the trail cams, food plots and gadgets. It seems to be who can get the acres, pour the protein to them, watchem on the trail cams and show up on time. Bows are shooting 300 fps, muzzle loaders and shotgun are shooting like rifles. From what I have seen of AK while fishing. Physical demand alone i would guess makes most AK big game hunts pretty tough. Will throw out a pretty wary midwest opponent, the wiliy coyote.

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                      • #12
                        OK

                        Dennis, I agree. I am just saying that if they are wary, they spook and get into places that aren't fun to get. Thus, I said, not impossible to get at, just wary creatures! Personally, I have seen no animal that is so wary that I can't kill it. It seems that once you cross the 100 yard barrier, bears (grizz/brown) seem to have some sixth sense that makes them very wary even when wind conditions are in your favor. I guess "no" animals are so wary that they can't be stalked. I would guess that with all the pressure that "big" whitetails have, they must be pretty darn wary creatures!

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                        • #13
                          Whitetail

                          Since whitetails have been mentioned several times, I need to comment. The big ones have a nasty habit of becoming nocturnal. As such, they become very difficult to hunt. That is their "wary" component.

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                          • #14
                            perception is everything

                            I've seen plenty of wary moose. Cows especially. I've got to witness stalks from on high too. Amazing how far off a moose can smell a hunter, and how fast they can be gone. Quietly too. It's kinda interesting many don't think moose are wary. Yeah, in rut they can be easily confused and hunted, but I've had more cows end up ruining a stalk for me than I can count, and bullwinkle following their lead off and out of there.

                            If you spend enough time out in the woods and mtns and on the rivers you're eventually going to see every critter out there at some point or another. Not at the same time of course. And if you spend a fair amount of time sitting, just sitting, whether on a bluff overlooking a valley or at a beaver pond or in a stand, you'll also see some critters you don't normally see.

                            So while everything is wary to a degree, really the #1 thing that leads to hunting success is time afield. More time, more success. More time the more you learn. More country you get to know, more you will see. To include winter time, which I think most don't take into account. Lot easier to see stuff in winter when leaves are off the trees and snow adds contrast. It may be nigh impossible to ever see a coyote in summer, but get out there with a call in winter and they aren't all that wary. I've seen plenty of wolves in winter too. And if there are wolves in an area and you have a chance to sit on a kill site for a bit in the fall...well I guess wary is all in the perception of the individual. Heck, I was surrounded by eight wolves once. Quite the experience. Was dark and all I could see was the green reflection of their eyeballs in the flashlight beam. No weapon. One of the highlights of time afield, that's for sure. They weren't too "wary" then <grin>.
                            Mark Richards
                            www.residenthuntersofalaska.org

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Phil View Post
                              Since whitetails have been mentioned several times, I need to comment. The big ones have a nasty habit of becoming nocturnal. As such, they become very difficult to hunt. That is their "wary" component.

                              Well, to hunt "legally"

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