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rifle for extended hunt and float and sidearm

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  • rifle for extended hunt and float and sidearm

    I am planning an extended float for bear, moose, and smaller game that presents itself. I do most my hunting with a 270wsm and have access to a 7mm rem mag and a 35 rem lever action. But I feel I probably need a bigger gun. Dont you think?
    I like the med bore guns, if I need to step up I was thinking 9,3X62. Tikka make a short barrel raised sights gun in that caliber and I have taken a lot of african plains gane with that caliber and know it is the rifle that farmers used to tame africa.
    What do you think?
    And do I need a large sidearm? Min caliber?

  • #2
    I say go ahead and just roll with the 7mm. Plenty capable for moose/caribou on a float trip. As far as a slip arm? I'd prolly take a .22 pistol on a float hunt as weight isn't as much of a concern as a backpack hunt. Nice to have the option to pop a ptarmigan or spruce hen (grouse). Or if you are worried about bears a .44 mag ought to work for ya, but I honestly wouldn't worry bout the bears too much and just keep the camp clean. A .22 would be a lot more fun to have along IMO although I am sure a .44 mag would be more than capable of taking a grouse Unless you wanna buy some more guns then buy all means get something bigger, but I don't think you really need to.

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    • #3
      You didn't say whether you were or were not a resident so which bear you are hunting. You don't need a bigger rifle if you are not hunting the brown bears and even then you may not. You should take what you are most cofortable shooting and are ost accurate with. Use preiu bullets and you will be fine. If you are really looking for an excuse to get a new rifle, the 9.3 is a great caliber. I've done a "few" hunts up here and have a .44 mag and I have yet to take it with me. If you really want to take a handgun, that is the caliber I would take.

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      • #4
        It sounds like you already own a 9.3x62 and feel pretty comfy shooting it? If so, bring that! Would do great on bear/moose/bou.

        Agree with Lanche that the 7mm would work, but if you want to bring something bigger for the bears, the 9.3 would be great.

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        • #5
          If you don't already own a 9.3mm take a look at the .338-06. They are very close in performance and you can have a wide bullet weight selection-if you load. I'd second the .22 for a sidearm, or you can be very different and take a .22 rifle and a .460 or .500 in a long barreled hunter version! Have fun!
          I may be slow, but I get where I'm going!

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          • #6
            Lookin4adventure,

            Your plan of bringing your 9.3x62 mauser is a great idea and I know exactly the gun you are speaking of. It's the Tikka Battue carbine. It has the 20 inch barrel and fast aquisition sights. I couldn't think of a better gun for floating rivers of Alaska. I was torn between that rifle and the CZ because both rifles had 20 inch barrels and awsome style. I went for the CZ because I hadn't yet owned a full lenth stocked bolt rifle. But the Tikka is just as sharp looking IMO. Way to be unique! Good luck.
            www.freightercanoes.com www.copperheadalaska.com
            sigpic
            matnaggewinu

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            • #7
              caliber selection

              i agree, with a rifle it is what you are most confortable with, for bear and big game i personally rock a .375 mag and for a side arm i have a .smith and wesson .460 mag which is a bad mofo. but for the price you can not beat a good old dirty harry .44 mag. And for the small game i have a little marlin papoose that breaks down and will easily pack into a day pack or float pack. And the newer ones with open sights and a little practice you can be on target at 100yrds

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              • #8
                The 22 pistol is a good idea. I carry a Browning Buckmark and some 22 CB longs, though they don't cycle the semi-auto pistol they are really quiet and won't ruin a lot of meat if you miss the head on the grouse/ptarmigan.

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                • #9
                  Take a firearm you can use accurately. Your confidence in your shooting ability will pay huge rewards. In a gunfight I would rather be up against a novice with a .50 cal than a .22 sharpshooter.
                  Bill S.
                  I think your M's are sticking on your keyboard.
                  On my first Alaskan hunt I took a sidearm. .44 cal Ruger Redhawk with 30 rounds of ammo. Never needed it. Have not taken a back-up since.
                  Whatever you do, remember that moisture is your enemy. Spend money now to save $$$ later.
                  Nick Clegg
                  Husband, Father, Hunter,
                  Usually in that order
                  http://nixoutdoorpursuits.blogspot.com/

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lookin4adventure View Post
                    I am planning an extended float for bear, moose, and smaller game that presents itself. I do most my hunting with a 270wsm and have access to a 7mm rem mag and a 35 rem lever action. But I feel I probably need a bigger gun. Dont you think?
                    I like the med bore guns, if I need to step up I was thinking 9,3X62. Tikka make a short barrel raised sights gun in that caliber and I have taken a lot of african plains gane with that caliber and know it is the rifle that farmers used to tame africa.
                    What do you think?
                    And do I need a large sidearm? Min caliber?
                    Float hunts and blued guns are not a good mix no matter what the firearm or caliber. Short rifles in handy configurations and side arms have their place on Alaska's river trips, but it is much advised to have something in stainless or do the best you can afford to weather/water proof the firearm. (even if it is a waterproof case)

                    True, you can baby your guns on a river trip out in the rains, sleet/snow, or frosts... but why??? - Unless it is all you have; there are smarter choices available.

                    That Tikka Bat. model will definitely shoot well. Never held a Tikka (even WW II vintage) of any model that would not. The CZ makes another sturdy and quality rifle. PROBLEM: neither are Stainless or have any extended harsh, wet conditions treatments or coatings. Continual care will be needed on a float trip if you keep the gun at the ready out in the elements.

                    If that 270wsm or 7mm is stainless, reliable, in good working condition, and you hit where you aim - There is your answer.

                    Do you need a sidearm? Not really... just extra gun, little peace of mind, or some added fun.

                    Curious why the 9.3x62? I like the cartridge, and it's a bit different. Yet again somewhat better, more available selections.

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                    • #11
                      Many of the older Alaskans on this forum have 30 or more years running rivers with the same blued rifles they started with. Just because a rifle doesnt come in stainless configuration should not automatically disqualify it's worth on a river, especially if its got a lot going for it. You don't have to baby a rifle either. Stainless steel is a great thing, but there are a lot of folks out there that don't give a hoot weather or not their rifle is stainless to include myself. Many of my Alaska hunting and fishing books, documenteries, and biographies show pictures of some of the most accomplished outdoorsman in all of Alaska holding a rifle with blueing on it! So should they all turn in their rifles for a stainless one?
                      www.freightercanoes.com www.copperheadalaska.com
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                      matnaggewinu

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                      • #12
                        All of my hunting for big game is done with a .300 win mag or a 30-06 mauser, for my sidearm i carry a .44 super blackhawk, and ive never had a problem...funny thing is i just started hunting with the .300...i usually only bring the .44 on extended hunts, mainly for an unexpected bear attack during the nite or early morning in camp, but i have been known to take potshots at wolves and the like...but if im going sheep or goat hunting i trade it off for a a .22 single six. i really like marmot,and ptarmigan/grouse in mountain camp. i think your 7mm would work just fine, and you know, if you want an interesting sidearm, look into the taurus .45/410 revolver....that way you can have a small game cartridge, and still have the security of a .45 cal...
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