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  • #16
    I'll go out on a limb and say that if you shoot a deer with a 225 or 250 grainer from a 338, you'll ruin less meat with a shoulder shot than you would with a 270.

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    • #17
      I have a .30-06 with 150 grain Barnes X and they made a huge mess on a deer I shot. However, my dads .375 H&H magnum with 270 grain Barnes X bullets did not make a huge mess on a blacktail he shot.

      Take that .338, if it makes a mess, so be it. If it kills a brownie when you need it to, you'll be thankful that a little wasted meat is the least of your problems.
      "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

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      • #18
        .338 for deer

        Originally posted by rivense View Post
        Just bought a Remington 700XCR in .338wm. I was wondering, is it to much for blacktail? I mean, if I load it down, is it still to much?
        I say go for it! I have used my 338 for blacktail several times. Since they're smaller than moose and caribou, I generally "try" for a neck shot. It drops 'em faster than lightning with minimal damage. If you hit the shoulders and get some bones, yep, chunks can be a flyin'! BUT NOT ALWAYS! Either way, the 338 was all I had for years and since it shot the 250 grainers the best, that was all I hunted with. It will kill a deer (any deer) effortlessly. If you can handload heavy bullets at a slower speed, that would flatten' em pretty good too without the damage, kinda like a 45-70. It won't be like some lightweight-uber-magnum-highspeed-missiles launched at mach 4! Oh yah, a 270 works beautifully..... My .02...

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        • #19
          From my personal experience on Caribou I found that my .308 with 180 grain Nosler on a broadside lung shot caused at least 50-65% more percussion damage to the rib cage than my .338 with 225 grain Nosler partition. The .338 is so much faster, it causes less damage. After being followed by a 8-9 foot Toklat Grizzly for 2 miles with just my .308 I will never go afield with my .338
          "...and then Jack chopped down the beanstock, adding murder and ecological vandalism to the theft, enticement and vandalism charges already mentioned, but he got away with it and lived happily ever after without so much as a guilty twinge about what he had done. Which proves that you can be excused just about anything if you're a hero, because no one asks the inconvenient questions." Terry Pratchett's The Hogfather

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          • #20
            Originally posted by pike_palace View Post
            I have a .30-06 with 150 grain Barnes X and they made a huge mess on a deer I shot. However, my dads .375 H&H magnum with 270 grain Barnes X bullets did not make a huge mess on a blacktail he shot.
            Yep. Makes sense.

            150gr 30-06 = 2,910 fps
            270gr 375 H&H - 2,690 fps

            Speed destroys meat. Not big calibers.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Roger45 View Post
              From my personal experience on Caribou I found that my .308 with 180 grain Nosler on a broadside lung shot caused at least 50-65% more percussion damage to the rib cage than my .338 with 225 grain Nosler partition. The .338 is so much faster, it causes less damage. After being followed by a 8-9 foot Toklat Grizzly for 2 miles with just my .308 I will never go afield with my .338
              Interesting.

              The 180gr .308 factory loads (2,620 fps) are about 160 fps (moderately) slower than the factory 225gr .338 loads (2,780 fps), unless you're talking about handloads?

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