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  • #16
    That's another thing I was wondering about. Does FedEx serve Adak? I know Alaska Airlines don't allow camping stoves to be checked as baggage, even if they are brand new and never used. Therefore, I'd have to find some way to ship it out there.

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    • #17
      ADAK viva US Postal Service

      Originally posted by WIsam View Post
      That's another thing I was wondering about. Does FedEx serve Adak? I know Alaska Airlines don't allow camping stoves to be checked as baggage, even if they are brand new and never used. Therefore, I'd have to find some way to ship it out there.

      Here is a little tip I learned hunting in Cold Bay. U can ship most things USPS general delivery and in your own name. All mail is flown, but if you select general delivery, you get charged general delivery fees, but you stuff goes air mail :-)
      U would be surprised how much gear you can get there cheap going this route.
      Louis

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      • #18
        If you go with USPS do you pick up the package at the post office? Do they just hold it for you somewhere?

        Thanks

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        • #19
          ak airlines allows you to take stoves and lanterns as long as the tank is dry (they did check ours) wasnt a problem, you can buy fuel on the island

          zodiac would be handy to run across the interior bays but not much use in the oceans, not sure it would be worth the exspense, I would have given my right arm for a sea kayak at the bay we stayed at,there are several small fishing boats there i am sure you could rent, the best source for that info would be the general store

          adak is different then any other place it is a very tight knit group of people there which is good- understand that everyone there has multiple jobs the airline people also run the housing rentals, the liquor store owners run the "gas station" etc. etc.

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          • #20
            Last I checked with the Refuge there have been no transporter permits issued for 2009 yet, possibily one will? I think there is one outfitter permit for adak.

            For those who have had the good luck to ship antlers back how did you do it? Are there packing material, crates available on the Island? did you go AKAir cargo? do you recommend spliting the antlers?


            Thanks

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            • #21
              Adak Terrain

              The hiking conditions out there are veriable, but no too bad if you know where to hike and can see where you are going.

              These Adak posts always bring back some great memories of my teenage years and I go looking around for info. Adak Update has pdf scans of the USFWS recreation map that we used to use for planning our near death adventures. These pdf files are really large and take a while to load even on a T1 line. The topo lines on these maps are better than the USGS maps and show just how steep some of the ridges are. It appears the lines are on 100 ft contours.

              In flat areas the hiking is pretty good. It will be wet, but spongy and you need good ankle support so rubber boots won't work. We hiked in normal hiking boots and changed socks all the time - before goretex boots. Gaiters are required to keep the water from the grass off your legs. We only hiked in rain gear when it was raining. We wore wool all the time.

              There is an issue out there with over grown ponds. I have walked onto a couple and managed to walk out without breaking through. Look for a very consistant vegetation type that may be in a small depression which is easy to over look. These were typically found in large flat areas and not on any kind of varied terrain.

              On ridges and on the mountain sides you will find the footing always changing. In some areas you will have rocks covered in about 6 inches of tundra which makes for some ankle twisting issues if you try to move too fast. This stuff comes and goes, but you can waste a lot of time trying to find a way around it.

              The trails in and out of Lake Betty are the hardest part coming back with a load. The hillside on the west shore is steep keeping you pinned to the slope just above the lake shore. The trail used to be really muddy with lots of high step-up mud benches to go up and then down. I don't know how it is now, probably a little more vegetation. I have short legs so these step-ups were just about knee high meaning that I was carrying a 100 pound pack and my own butt on one leg as I stepped up. There were dozens of these along the shore line trail. We would be fine endurance wise until this point in the return trip. By the time we made it around Lake Betty and to Finger Bay road we were toast ususally. The one advantage of the steep hillside is that we could rest standing up leaning our packs against it and take some weight off our legs.

              We used Gannet Pass all the time to get into the center of the island from Lake Betty. It can be hard to find in the fog, but is not too hard to find. In the fog if you get into sketchy terrain back down and try again to the other direction. If you are on the trail you should not find it too hard to walk - just up and up and up over a few rocks in spots but not steep. Once you are on the back side it is a nice hike down into Gannet Lake.

              The map is not accurate since it does not show the large stream that flows to the west draining Gannet Lake being connected to Gannet. Not a big deal, but if you are going further south to Teardrop Lake and Hidden bay for reds you need to stay on the west side of Gannet Lake and as soon as you cross the second stream flowing into the lake turn away from the lake shore and head SW for the pass over into Teardrop keeping the second stream to your right. If you go directly south from the end of Gannet you will end up climbing some really steep terrain not shown on the contour lines. Aim for the pass to the southwest it is broad and open and easy on both sides.

              If you look at the Down Town map on Adak Update you will notice a broad valley to the west of Lake Betty with some trails through it - Hikers Pass. This is a great place to sit and wait for 'bou to walk through if you are meat hunting. Back in the Day a buddy shot one there and it was the easist pack out I did while living there. The hardest pack out was from Teardrop Lake over two passess to get back. Luckily there were 4 of us kids so we could share the load of the one animal.

              The trails from Lake Betty will connect with the trails from Lake Bonnie Rose that go to the west through Husky Pass. The old jeep road down into Lake Constance was still visible in the early 1990's and in the 1980's 'bou used it all the time.

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              • #22
                Thanks, great information!! I had some topo maps, but they only showed 1/2 the detail of these. Most of the trails weren't depicted.

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                • #23
                  Those trails are "routes" based on easy terrain. The only time you will notice a trail is when there is a muddy ditch to walk in.

                  The little red crosses are emergency shelters. They used to be 6 foot by 12 foot wood stave water tanks from WWII, but I was told they were swapped out with real huts, but I could be wrong. The tanks were pretty nice as long as the dumb guys in the military didn't use them to camp in and eat all the rations.

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                  • #24
                    I was on a search on Adak a few months ago for a missing hiker and I got to search a few of those shelters. They still are the big wooded ones you were talking about and believe it or not, there still is alot of the original gear in some of them. They are pretty neat to look in, it's almost like a time capsule. From what i've heard some people that hike in on Adak stash their meat in those shelters during their hunt.

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                    • #25
                      When the base was active the search and rescue guys and USFWS would stock the shelters up and by the end of september the one in Gannet was typically torn up due to all the passers by going to Hidden Bay. The ones off the beaten path typically staid in good shape. There were only about 10 of us teenagers that hiked that far, but there were hundreds of navy guys that made the trip for reds all summer long and the hunting in august an through the fall until the snow came down. We were blamed for stuff all the time, but we never did get into the tanks other than to clean up someones mess. The guys that pooped in them really sucked.

                      The one thing that always bothered us about the Hidden Bay cabin was the military shipping coffin used for storage and a bench for the table. We were just kids then and drinking hard (didn't post those photos on the other thread) so we could freak out the easily rattled folks. That cabin was a welcome sighte

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                      • #26
                        US Post Office

                        Originally posted by wildwilderness View Post
                        If you go with USPS do you pick up the package at the post office? Do they just hold it for you somewhere?

                        Thanks
                        Sorry for the delay:
                        Yes! You ship it general delivery in your name. They hold it until you get there. Worked like a charm in Cold Bay

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                        • #27
                          thanks

                          thanks for the info for shipping. I guess I can ship stuff and call the Post Office to confirm delivery. with the extra cost for baggage it probly wont cost too much more and then I don't have to worry about the airlines loosing it.

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                          • #28
                            Has anyone ever taken notice to waterfowl on Adak? I was looking at possibly scouting it out next year but it looks to be an expensive ride out. I have talked to a couple of oldtimers that gave me some pointers. Also are there 4-wheeler rentals on the island?

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                            • #29
                              From what I hear, you can rent four wheelers, but they are not allowed on the south side of the island.

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by southernduckhunter View Post
                                Has anyone ever taken notice to waterfowl on Adak? I was looking at possibly scouting it out next year but it looks to be an expensive ride out. I have talked to a couple of oldtimers that gave me some pointers. Also are there 4-wheeler rentals on the island?
                                They migrate through in the fall, but don't stick around for long. Sea ducks are around most of the year in the saltwater. Divers and some puddlers in the ponds. Most of the ponds out there do not have much in the way of food for a puddler so they don't spend much time around there.

                                If you spend a month or two you might see a Eurasian GW teal or wigeon. We had some kind of lost Asain Swan one summer/fall in 1992 or 1991. It was a juvi and left after two months.

                                You might get a chance to see some Emperor Geese at low tide in Clam Lagoon, but can't shoot them.

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