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Goat hunt weights?

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  • Bighorse
    replied
    Sweet

    Trapper Bob,

    Hats off-to-ya! Honestly I'm impressed by that show to grit. Your photos and story are a real contribution to this thread.

    I had a similar experience this last year with my goat hunting partner.....he swore by the time we hit the beach he'd not do it anytime soon. Just short of refusing to do it again he'll think really hard before commiting to head up the mountain after a goat again.

    Lu Jon I'd love to hear more about your pack....I'll head over to the gear thread to check it out.

    I guess the reason I keep typing about training is because I've seen strong capable guys fade after three days on the mountain. There are few training methods that do prepare a guy with full-time job for it but we can try our best in the interest of injury prevention.

    Leave a comment:


  • LuJon
    replied
    I recently started a thread about my own quest for the perfect mountain hunting pack in the gear section. I think that I am on the right track. I am working with Dan McHale to modify one of his INEX packs to fit the bill. The two things that are for sure is it will be one of a kind and it will be expensive! I am also hoping for light, of course that is the same thing as saying expensive when it comes to mountain hunting...

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  • trapperbob
    replied
    These two came out in one load

    These two goats came out in one load, a day and a half pack. The larger was a 9 yr. old goat and was lung punched with no meat loss. 93 lbs. of clean boned meat, and a wet lifesize cape, was right up at 150 lbs. The other goat was a 6 yr.old with one shoulder hit so lost some meat, and I took camp and my lifesize cape was dry, but I was still right up at 150 lbs. It was worth it as we each have beatiful lifesize goats, but my brother in law swears it took years off his life. We each took a fall coming out he suffered a pretty badly bruised arm, I cut my palm open pretty bad. We had to carry these goats up about 800 feet or so which was the worst of it. Then at the beach we had to cross a mid calf deep mud flat to get to the boat which took everything we had left. Both of us carried Barney's packs. It can be done and it is rewarding however it may shorten your older body hunting career.


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  • Bighorse
    replied
    Honestly

    Most internal packs are not designed to carry the weight a hunter packs after the animal is down. Inevitably stitches will give, suspensions sag, fabrics break apart. I can't even get my waist buckles to secure tight enough to really lock my load onto my back sometimes. It depends on how many MH meals I've eaten.

    I know I'm inviting the wrath of certain pack owners but with the three internals I've owned they have all experienced serious strains from hunting. I don't complain too much though. I just patch and sew with the intention of making em better than before. Aquaflex is a great product for coating surfaces and sealing up at-home sewing.

    I'd love to see the face of a company rep from some greenie outdoor gear company if they read a letter comlaining about their pack performance after a few goat hunts. Just for fun I'd say I was Polar Bear hunting too. They wouldn't know the difference between the white hairs of a goat and a bear.

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  • eagle937
    replied
    internal frame pack

    Anyone tried an internal frame backpack for sheep/goat hunts. I know my Dana internal frame is much more comfortable than any external frame pack frame I've use. The drawback would seem to be size of the bag to take gear, meat, etc.
    Dave

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  • OldRgr
    replied
    I have done it once and won't do it again. Without getting into the specifics, I lost all the skin off the bottoms of both feet!!! :mad: I can laugh about it now, but for a week or two, it was not pleasurable. If you do it, I would come along a take pictures so everyone can "enjoy" your hunt. Now I am laughing. J.

    Leave a comment:


  • redhed
    replied
    It can be done but I dont reccomend it

    I've taken two goats now and was grateful to have a buddy along to help share the load both times. I suppose it could be done solo but it would be no easy task. Better be in tip-top shape!

    Leave a comment:


  • sockeye1
    replied
    Originally posted by Bighorse View Post
    Ya, being a big mountain hunter is a disadvantage when the going is up with a load or not. I find though with strong shoulders and capable lower units I'm able to move rather quick down hill with a heavy load. It takes flexablity and speed though. I'm also already preparing for it because I realize being a large mountain hunter takes that much more energy and stamina to get-er-done.

    Will I hesitate to roll a big ol billy this year.........no way!! It's on and if I have to do it solo I will but I'm working on a group effort for moral, safety, and fun.

    Let us not forget the most powerful muscle........our brain. I really enjoyed the previous comments on the sheep gear thread about just learning to suffer.
    True that!!! As a coach, that is something I preach almost everyday. If you can conquer your mental weaknesses, its amazing what the body will do- that's why I enjoy packing/hiking...I haven't found a better mind-over-matter activity...that I actually enjoy.

    Leave a comment:


  • dieNqvrs
    replied
    I am not afraid to pack. My pack this fall with the bear hide alone was 140 pounds for 2 plus miles, and was up and down through alders and through little creeks and snowy grass. It was a push but not impossible. I have also packed dozens of elk quarters through wind fall, and whole deer numerous times. Two sheep, one was a half plus cape and the other was 3/4 plus cape and both were not much fun in the rocks! Steep rocky slippery shale with too much weight will spell disaster from what I already know and you guys tell me. The load shuttle back and forth off the steep mountain is a good idea, and the way to go.

    Thanks.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bighorse
    replied
    Balance and coordination

    Ya, being a big mountain hunter is a disadvantage when the going is up with a load or not. I find though with strong shoulders and capable lower units I'm able to move rather quick down hill with a heavy load. It takes flexablity and speed though. I'm also already preparing for it because I realize being a large mountain hunter takes that much more energy and stamina to get-er-done.

    Will I hesitate to roll a big ol billy this year.........no way!! It's on and if I have to do it solo I will but I'm working on a group effort for moral, safety, and fun.

    Let us not forget the most powerful muscle........our brain. I really enjoyed the previous comments on the sheep gear thread about just learning to suffer.

    Leave a comment:


  • TWB
    replied
    Being 6'4 218, gravity works against me. Luckily I'm bringin a tank on my goat hunt to help.

    Leave a comment:


  • BRWNBR
    replied
    funny sockeye i was thinking the same thing but wasnt' in the mood to type a bunch of stuff...lol
    i've shuttled once i think and will do it again without a thought if i think i need to. But your right on, shuttle the tough stuff and sweat the easiER stuff. I've done it with clients and there packs, i'll run my up head come back and get theirs, they usually just drop it and keep on walking so i'm going back and forth past them with the packs while they trudge along....its a work out..but at least we get out!
    i'm 5'8 and 170lbs and can tote weight like i never dreamed before i started guiding...push your body a couple times and you'll realize what your really capabale of..ie can survive. Makes the next tough load not seem so bad.
    Bigger guys usually don't pack loads as well as smaller guys. center of gravity, muscle it takes to keep weight that much higher off the ground centered, bending forward takes more movement and more muslce to stop the movement...donkey and horse.... not always the case but the majority of the time.

    Leave a comment:


  • sockeye1
    replied
    Idea...?

    Here's an option that hasn't been discussed, how about shuttling your loads? I've done it on a couple of sheep hunts and it has worked out well. My hunting partner and I are esentially physically equal- although he's 6'4" and 200 pounds- this is a key ingredient if you are going to shuttle loads. We only shuttle through steep terrain, and then we'll load ourselves down over any mild slopes or flat terrain. Our packs fully loaded last time weighed 152 and 154, a heavy load for sure, but broken in half it was much easier, and body preserving. We usually wouldn't go further than 2-3 miles between shuttles, and the walk back is always nice because it almost served as a recovery walk. If you shuttle you obviously need to plan on taking more time, but it is an option if both hunters take a Goat.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bighorse
    replied
    Good topic

    I went into a hole to recover a Billy goat last year. It was a big goat and I carried out the hide and meat solo for only like 30 minutes. I was spent and glad to have my partner take his share of the load.

    They are indeed huge if you shoot a big billy. Like has already been mentioned......a young goat or nanny is different. Note, I didn't say easy!

    I'm also a load packer....6'2" with an athletic 230 pound athletic frame. I'll be going to the pool just as soon as I'm done with this email. I hit the weights in the winter and spring months and run the mountains up until hunting time. Why? Because I know the pain involved in getting into the backcountry for good animals and what it takes to carry em out.

    This year I'm going in with another person to target a billy. There will be frank discussion beforehand about only taking one.

    There is fun and successful hunting and there is painful and successful hunting. I like to have fun.

    Keep your legs healthy........build relationships with capable mountain hunters and work the give and take angle.

    Leave a comment:


  • 450HUNTER
    replied
    I had 95lbs of boneless meat from my Kodiak goat. I weighted it at Sea Hawks Air office and that was meat only. Once you add cape,horns,rifle,and camp you are asking for trouble if you pack it out in one trip. To me its not worth hurting yourself after a great sucessfull hunt. It would suck to end it by hurting yourself.

    Leave a comment:

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