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game bags vs. flies

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  • game bags vs. flies

    What is everyone using to keep flies off your meat? I had mine bagged, but still had a few flies due to unseasonable warm temps. We then treated the bags with citric acid and had far fewer flies on the bags. It occurs to me that a pre treated bag might be the ticket.
    Thoughts?

  • #2
    There is a thread here somewhere about this very thing. Never tried it myself but I thing some guys have with some success. Try doing a search.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    • #3
      I hear that the liquid game bag works fairly well. I know an old man who puts a fairly heavy layer of black pepper on the meat. He says it works but I havn't tried it yet.

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      • #4
        Pepper

        Tried it this year after seeing the flies getting after my meat, I'd say it helped, wouldn't call it fullproof.

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        • #5
          I soak mine in Lemon juice and then air dry it. The acicd from the juice remains on the bags. So when a fly lands it burn there feet and they fly away.
          Living the Alaskan Dream
          Gary Keller
          Anchorage, AK

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          • #6
            Nix the pepper!

            Originally posted by Wombat View Post
            I hear that the liquid game bag works fairly well. I know an old man who puts a fairly heavy layer of black pepper on the meat. He says it works but I havn't tried it yet.
            Wombat,

            Black pepper just won't die! Years ago the thinking was that a liberal coating of black pepper spread over the meat while it was still tacky would repel flies. With the game bags we have nowadays, pepper is not only unnessary, it will cost you some of your meat. It makes a huge mess at the butcher shop and has to be trimmed off during processing. I've spoken with several meat processors about this, and have gotten the same story from all. NO PEPPER!

            Dunno about the liquid game bag product. I suspect it will leach out of the meat though, wherever fluid is leaking out. I wouldn't use it and there's no need to if you're using game bags anyway.

            -Mike
            Michael Strahan
            Site Owner
            Alaska Hunt Consultant
            1 (907) 229-4501

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            • #7
              I've used the citric solution for eight years now. I buy the powder from Indian Valley and it seems to work well. I soak them in the solution, air dry the bags and then seal them in a ziplock or vacuum pack them. As fishnhuntr says its not fool proof. The reason I do it is the second year I hung my meat bags right next to my buddies who did not treat his bags. There was a big difference. He had flies laying eggs on his bags and I did not. So its worth the littel effort it takes.

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              • #8
                Pepper

                Black pepper does work on the outside of the bag to keep flies off. I have never used it directly on the meat, and I see no reason to do so.
                "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

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                • #9
                  Flies on Game Bags

                  Originally posted by Bill S. View Post
                  I've used the citric solution for eight years now...I hung my meat bags right next to my buddies who did not treat his bags....He had flies laying eggs on his bags and I did not...
                  Bill,

                  If your game bags are breathable yet tight enough to not allow fly eggs to pass through the material, why bother treating the bags at all? Fly larvae have to have moisture to survive, and a few maggots on the outside of your game bags will not taint the meat at all if they cannot get to it. Also, because maggots must have moisture to survive, this says that the game bags are not properly dry as they should be. I had the same thing going on with my TAG Bags this year (flies laying eggs on them), but I just brushed them off. The eggs were mostly in creases where there was a little moisture. All I had to do was move the meat around and get rid of the creases.

                  I keep hearing about folks treating the bags, but I can't see the point, as long as eggs cannot get to the meat. What's your take?

                  -Mike
                  Michael Strahan
                  Site Owner
                  Alaska Hunt Consultant
                  1 (907) 229-4501

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                  • #10
                    Poison

                    Use poison and a sacrificial pile of meat, all the rest of the meat will be fly free. It also helps to put a few strands of fly paper around the meat pole. Cheap insurance. Pepper is extremely high in bacteria, that is why you don't pepper food until you are ready to eat it. Using pepper will accelerate the spoiling process. Game bags are needed, to keep the leaves and dirt off the meat. Change them out, until the meat is dry on the surface. I take the bags off, periodically, to let the meat air. Shade the meat pole, but not so close that it restricts air movement. A white canvas tarp makes the best shade, as it will be quite a bit cooler under it vs a blue plastic tarp. Worst possible thing to use is visqueen. It actually acts like a hot house and really causes problems when the suns rays hit it for even a few minutes.
                    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
                    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Michael Strahan View Post
                      Bill,
                      I keep hearing about folks treating the bags, but I can't see the point, as long as eggs cannot get to the meat. What's your take?

                      -Mike
                      Maybe I'm just one of those that do not like seeing eggs all over my meat bags. Its just something I do so that I can get every little bit of chance on my side so the meat will remain good. I know flies will lay the eggs on wet bags but this is Alaska and sometimes, no matter how hard you try, the bags get wet and it takes awhile hanging under a tarp to dry out. I'd rather drop the $3 for the citrus mix and spend the hour it takes to treat them then take a chance.

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                      • #12
                        Treating bags

                        The less flies you have hanging around the outside, the less likely one will find its way inside. Sometimes you get a hole or two in the bag and may not notice it for a while.

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                        • #13
                          Note to Bill and Rick

                          Makes sense to me. I've noticed that the cheesecloth bags do allow fly eggs to slip through, and I do see the point about small holes that may go unnoticed. I might have to give citric a try next time. I have it with me most hunts, but have not used it yet. This year would have probably been a good time to try it.

                          Thanks for the input!

                          -Mike
                          Michael Strahan
                          Site Owner
                          Alaska Hunt Consultant
                          1 (907) 229-4501

                          Comment

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