Meat / Trophy Poll

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  • Michael Strahan
    replied
    What kind of animal?

    Originally posted by VA Steve
    If you didn't get my earlier message, about $100 to ship 90# via air frieght from Indian Valley meats to Dulles Airport in northern VA.
    Steve,

    What kind of animal was this? Did you donate any? Finally, is this 90# of processed?

    -Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • Alaskacanoe
    replied
    Promote hunting

    I usually don't take an animal anymore unless it is as the backup guy. The experience of watching young and older hunters alike enjoy the sport of kings. It is such a wonderful thing to have these oportunities for our expeditions in the Wilds of Alaska. Watching my Step son take his first big game animal of his life. The way he reacted, The smile that still 8 months later crosses his entire face when I brag about our hunt together. The trophy is indeed to me-- that we have added anouther member to our hunting world. I hope I can be a good example always of true sportsmanship and ethics. That is what brings me the most joy.
    Max

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  • VA Steve
    replied
    If you didn't get my earlier message, about $100 to ship 90# via air frieght from Indian Valley meats to Dulles Airport in northern VA.

    Leave a comment:


  • Water_Gremlin
    replied
    I hunt for the experience. If I am just hunting for meat or trophy antlers than its not as fun if you get skunked. If the main goal is to have fun on a hunting expedition a great time will be had even if an animal isnt bagged. Coming home with meat for the freezer is an added bonus.

    Leave a comment:


  • viktor
    replied
    why i hunt

    I work as a manager over seeing a department of 40 plus. I aslo work in the hospitality business. As you can imagine it is flat out crazy. I hunt to get away from it. I hunt to be able to relax and actually listen to nothing, but in reality listen to alot like birds, mosquitoes, calls of cow moose the bleet of a lamb sheep in the fog, the sound of the dog swimming across a lake with a duck in his mouth, the 6 wheeler, the snow machine, the sound of my buddies shotgun, the sound of a ducks wings as they fly over, the sound of a bird hitting the ground and yes the sound of nothing at all other then just plain natural nature. Words do not do justice as to what the experience in Alaska is. If i shoot somthing and if i get a nice rack it just makes it better. Just think of how much different the food tastes, how cozy it is laying in a tent and hearing it rain. How exciting it is just to sit on a snow machine and wait for a flag! For me it is the experience for sure then the meat then the rack. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • TroutsMan
    replied
    Age and Animals affect it.

    I read somewhere once that there are 3 stages in a hunters life.

    The first stage is just getting out and be able to shoot your gun/bow and bag the animal.

    The second stage is the Trophy stage where you will pass up any small animal for the chance at that really nice trophy.

    The 3rd stage is not careing if you shoot anything and are just happy to be there in a beautiful place with family and friends.

    I would hope all of these stages of a hunters life include meat care and not wasting anything. We as hunters have the responsibilty to teach those arround us hunting ethics in every respect of the animal.

    I belive I am in between stage 2 and stage 3.
    I hunt for a trophy animal in every species. I dont need the meat and in some cases different species are better tasting then others.
    I do however make sure none of the meat is wasted. Shelters in my area are so greatful for the meat that it would be a shame not to help them out.

    I voted for the experience, but trophy came very close. Meat I put last not because I dont respect that aspect of hunting, but because I dont need the meat.
    I will be going on a Black bear hunt on the 4th week of may down in S.E. AK and they tell me the locals there are greatful for the meat. If they are not in need of it at that time I wont hesitate to Take it home or find someone else who is in need of it.
    Sorry for the lengthy post.

    Russ,

    Leave a comment:


  • hilbile1
    replied
    Every Reason Possible

    I would have to honestly say, I enjoy for all reasons. I have dreamed of hunting Alaska since I was a kid, just had the bug I suppose. Now that I am here, I dreading the day I leave. But not just hunting here, hunting any where, just having the ability and choice to enjoy what we are blessed with have, it makes it all worth the time and effort. From the meat to trophies. Ain;t nothing better than grillin the steaks with a cold one, lookin at the heads in the window and remembering all the good and bad with all my family and friends!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Terry
    replied
    Differs Animal to Animal

    When I go hunting for bou or moose it is for the meat normally. A couple years back I did a lone flyin moose hunt, even thought it was a nice 60"er the time in the field was all about the experience. When I take the boy it is about the time in the field together. When going bear or goat hunting it is more of a thropy hunt.

    Leave a comment:


  • Michael Strahan
    replied
    shipping meat

    Originally posted by B_M
    Steve - It's a little off topic, but how much did it cost you to ship the meat back to VA? I hear such concerns about the cost of shipping meat to the lower 48 after a successful hunt, but I've yet to see hard numbers on what this cost actually is. Not trying to start another debate on the merits of donating meat locally (I'll leave that for the Kotz discussion), but I'd still like to hear what it cost you. Thanks!

    -Brian
    Brian,

    Your post points out an important issue. Would you be interested in posting a new thread on that? I'd hate to have some really good info get buried in here where few people will see it. There are lots of options for meat shipping, and I personally would be interested in learning what others are doing and the costs involved.

    Not telling you what to do, but I think you have the makings of a great thread here.

    -Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • Brian M
    replied
    Steve - It's a little off topic, but how much did it cost you to ship the meat back to VA? I hear such concerns about the cost of shipping meat to the lower 48 after a successful hunt, but I've yet to see hard numbers on what this cost actually is. Not trying to start another debate on the merits of donating meat locally (I'll leave that for the Kotz discussion), but I'd still like to hear what it cost you. Thanks!

    -Brian

    Leave a comment:


  • VA Steve
    replied
    Alaska Hunting

    Only been lucky enough to hunt in Alaska once, caribou drop hunt in Sep 05. I would order my reasons, in priority order, as the experience, meat, and trophy. The experience alone, a week of complete solitude, beautiful scenery and comraderie, made the trip specatacular, with or without bagging an animal. I did manage to get a nice bull and had a mount done, which now hangs on my wall here in northern VA, where it reminds me every day of how luck I was to spend a few weeks in such a remarkable state. Stil enjoying the meat from the freezer as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Akboondocker
    replied
    Alaskan Experience

    I voted for the experience. Nothing makes you feel closer to nature than being on a hunt with good friends, food and a good camp set up. Some of the more memorable hunts I've been on we didn't shoot one round but had the time of our lives. I agree with Mud, you can buy meat at the grocery store for pennys on the dollar compared to what it costs to go hunting these days. Nothing beats being in the outdoors...nothing.

    Great poll Mike!

    Leave a comment:


  • AkHunter45
    replied
    I hunt Alaska because there's nothing like this anywheres else and to share it with friends is even more enjoyable!

    Leave a comment:


  • Bravowhiskey
    replied
    The experience

    The experience is something you can't substatute. Having grown up hunting and fishing, I really am missing the experiences you get fromthe hunt. Due to the Germany laws it is almost impossible for an American to hunt over here. Looking forward to being able to take my son out with me when I get back to the USA. We try to get into the woods as often as possible and at least get a little bit of the enjoyment of the outdoors. My little guy is sure to be a hunter as he grows, he wants to "boom" all the little critters we come across over here. Brad wanted me to put his picture on here so here he is.
    Attached Files

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  • northriver21
    replied
    Tradition

    1 The peace and quiet of being in the woods and leaving the crazyness behind, the tradition of spending time with family in the field. the thought of raising your young sons the same way you were raised. Teaching them to respect the right to harvest a legal animal and the joy that comes with that.

    2 Meat, My family wont starve if I dont put a moose in the freezer, but I do almost every year. We use every bit of the meat it is healthy and the satisfaction of putting food on the table. I dont pass on a legal animal. Meat in the freezer is more important than a rack on the wall.

    3 Horns, if I accomplish both of the above listed, and get a big rack then that is the cherry on top.

    Leave a comment:

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