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  • Larry Bartlett
    replied
    The reference i sighted was the Alaska Hunting Regulation but more so from experience with LEOs who check hunters, as well as having been married to a federal conservation officer. All initial encounters with a conservation officer will be subject to his or her legal interpretation of Alaska law. You may or may not get by without a citation which then may or may not be decided by a court down the road. Unfortunately the court location will be in Alaska nearest the ticketing officer's home base. This makes you think twice about challenging regulation language, IMO.

    lb

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  • majorbam
    replied
    From my perspective I think if you want to set up a field expedient cooler or even if you need extra cooler space at your house or cabin for harvest season the way to go is the Coolbot system (see you mentioned it in one of your posts). This system is starting to really gain traction in the small farming, brewery, hunting, and butchering sectors because it is simple, cost effective, and works.

    You can Google for a lot more information and videos and testimonials but I think this is the simplest, lightest, cheapest, and "proven" way to accomplish what you're thinking about. Sold at both Cabela's and BPS.

    Here are two links to get you started to see if it matches your needs:

    https://www.storeitcold.com/

    https://www.cabelas.com/shop/en/cool...ure-controller

    Hope this helps a bit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daved
    replied
    After all this, this is what I came up with.

    Not going to process in the field for fear of the law. I actually do not disagree with needing to keep the quarters intact while in the field. Sounds reasonable.

    You would need a 24 CuFt freezer to have any hope of fitting an entire bone in moose. You can use a thermostat to turn the freezer on when the inside temperature is above say 40 deg so effectively turning the freezer into a fridge. It weighs 200 pounds. Plus a generator of 50#. So 250 pounds extra weight. The 250# weight penalty is too much for us.

    We could make a walk in cooler easy enough with a generator, home air conditioner and a way to keep the AC from freezing up with the Coolbot. Use an insulated tarp (concrete blanket) and some spruce poles to build a make shift structure. The A/C and generator are 50# each and the blanket is about 10#. 110# total. If we go early season, have more than 2 boats or the weather is forecasted to be overly warm, we may do this.

    We could just be more diligent with what we are already doing, but do it better. Changing out game bags more often and use more synthetic, build a better meat hanging structure, use more citric acid and check the PH. We will for sure do this anyways.

    We could also bring some fans to circulate more air and keep things cool and drier. Use D/C battery from one of the boats and a couple D/C fans. 10 pounds maybe. We have 2 batteries per boat already so we don't need to add weight. We can swap batteries and charge them while using the boats, which we do most every day. I don't know if this will really do much though. I think normal day breezes will be about the same as the D/C fans. Maybe if we bring big box fans, but then we would need A/C and a generator.

    Just plan on spending a ton of money and piss of my wife by having the moose shipped out to Fairbanks and her to pick up last minute. I would have said cooler set up already at home. This is my least favorite option for a host of reasons. Mostly staying married

    Thanks for the input guys.

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  • mark knapp
    replied
    We have carried freezers with us to Chitina and other places. The idea of building a walk in cooler for a ten day trip seems a bit much. It seems like all that stuff could take up as much room in the boat as a good sized freezer.

    You could invoke a rule that the guy that kills an early moose heads home, then it's his decision.

    I would leave the chunks as big as will fit in a freezer, leave the evidence of sex in tact and for sure make pains to salvage as much meat as possible so no one could say there was less than a moose there. Certainly, a moose will fill a freezer quickly so the chances of you needing to sort out moose parts for inspection would be small.

    The problem is, if you pile a whole moose in the freezer it will likely not get cool enough in the center of the mass for days anyway and spoilage could still occur. You would need to unload the freezer every half a day or so and cycle the meat from center to outside so all the meat could cool evenly.

    Many of us plan our hunts late enough in the fall so that it's USUALLY cool enough to save a moose killed in the beginning. On our float hunts, we have alternate strips where we can meet an airplane to haul the meat to town for us. Then it's our wives problems to take care of the meat till we get back.

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  • Daved
    replied
    Thanks for posting. Funny, the reason I started this post was because of watching your videos just recently. Super appreciated

    I think you need to update the ASSWHOLE continuum to include complacency. We hang everything and then go out and hunt for another day. We might not see the meat again for a day and all sorts of stuff can happen. Such as it gets wet and warm and generally that is no Bueno. A day and a half like that and we have a big issue. Agreed, constantly monitoring and checking to meet is The best way. It would be nice to be able to set and forget for the day the temperature and humidity While we are in the field. It might seem lazy to bring a cooler but really it also may be efficient. There is always that fine line. Thanks again for the input

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  • akgriz
    replied
    Originally posted by Larry Bartlett View Post
    Legally if you're hunting in a bone-in required unit, the leg bones and ribs must remain intact until field exit. There is no other way to interpret this requirement in those areas.

    Here's a pretty comprehensive presentation on meat care that will help you with that task:



    lb
    Larry, I've got most of your books and these videos--great stuff!!!! What is your source regarding the bone-in issue? I'm asking since the reg reads "naturally attached to the bone until the meat has been transported from the field OR (emphasis mine) is processed for human consumption."

    Leave a comment:


  • Larry Bartlett
    replied
    Legally if you're hunting in a bone-in required unit, the leg bones and ribs must remain intact until field exit. There is no other way to interpret this requirement in those areas.

    Here's a pretty comprehensive presentation on meat care that will help you with that task:



    lb

    Leave a comment:


  • mallardman
    replied
    I have hung moose for 17 days and never had any spoil. Good bags, hang it near a creek so there is always some air flow, keep it our of the sun. If it gets hot it is usually only hot for a few hours of the day. we have taken box fans and made a tunnel around the hanging meat with a tarp, put the box fan on one end and it keeps bugs away and a few degrees cooler during those hot hours. Everyday I take the bags off and inspect the meat and take its temp. If you make sure the quarters are EXTREAMLY clean before you bag them you should be fine.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daved
    replied
    Originally posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    Is there a freezer in Galena at the airport? Could you run it down there to pick up latter or fly it out and have a friend pick it up? Just brainstorming here.
    "the Koola Buck, nice. Except it is $3500 and 350# . Ouch" Glad I don't need one either.
    It does not take a beer cooler to get moose hunters all juiced up and worthless. And the addition of one will not likely be more encouraging. Having the trooper guaranteed to show up because you are processing your game funny might keep people in line.

    Putting a moose is somebody's cooler or freezer is not a sure thing. They get full and usually only want to hold it for a few days until the next plane leaves. Not to mention the hassle of getting it there. It may be 150-200 mile round trip and a couple days out of the field. 50-100 gallons of gas depending on weather, mileage and what boat goes. At least $300 round trip in gas, maybe 4-500. You pay for the freezer space. From the Nowitna, the available freezer and cooler space is going the wrong way home so you are going to put over 100 miles extra to your trip not to mention the trip there in the first place. If you pay for a flight, that is a few hundred dollars. And the air carrier will only keep it cool for a couple days in Fairbanks so you have to have somebody come get it. That is a about 15 hours of time coming from Anchorage. So, it is best to keep it all in the field. The price of gas getting it to somebody then coming back to camp will more than pay for an air conditioner or small freezer. A small freezer is just that, too small for the quarters. It cost maybe $300. A big freezer is several hundred pounds and $900 new. Maybe $300 used? An air conditioner is about the same weight and expense as a small freezer and looks to be the option I am heading towards.

    Of course, we are going to be more diligent with meat care. We are ordering more Caribou and Tag bags to change out to dry clean bags more often. We have use the citric acid spray, but I think we need to use more of it, daily. We still have some thick cotton bags, but they get wet pretty fast and we are moving away from them pretty quickly.

    Leave a comment:


  • akgriz
    replied
    Originally posted by Daveinthebush View Post

    I have seen on some of the outdoor channel hunting shows where someone was selling manufactured storage units for this exact thing.
    https://www.basspro.com/shop/en/kool...in-meat-cooler
    Now you've gone and done it, Dave. Supposedly this thing holds 50 cases or 15 kegs on tap. The upshot is all the other hunters will be passed out drooling on themselves, and I'll have my choice of moose!

    Leave a comment:


  • Daveinthebush
    replied
    Is there a freezer in Galena at the airport? Could you run it down there to pick up latter or fly it out and have a friend pick it up? Just brainstorming here.
    "the Koola Buck, nice. Except it is $3500 and 350# . Ouch" Glad I don't need one either.

    Leave a comment:


  • SmokeRoss
    replied
    F&W looking at your moose head. "Where is the carcass?"
    You. "Processed and in the freezer."
    F&W. "Huh?"

    Leave a comment:


  • highestview
    replied
    I would be worried about running into a LEO who would find what you were doing to be so strange and abnormal he'd assume you're breaking some law and charge you thusly. LEO's have about a 5 minute capacity to discuss/argue about what the law actually is or means and then they just drop the hammer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Daved
    replied
    Originally posted by kaybur View Post
    This is a very good question. It seems to me that the hunting region itself needs to be clarified here. Perhaps this is real and feasible.
    Certainly. 21b on the Nowitna or Koyukuk. Meat on the bone requirement. We will have 2-3 boats in camp depending on the year. It is often 45-50 deg and raining for days and nothing dries out. Or, cold in the evening and 50 deg during the day. That scenario is not too bad, at least the meat cools at night and will dry out In both scenarios a cooler would be good for part of the time. When it is raining, wet, and overly warm for over.a week the air conditioner trick might dry things out a bit and keep things cool. The scenario of warm during the day would also benefit from cooling the meat for maybe 6-8 hrs when the sun is up then leave it open at night.

    I am starting to think that processing it on sight is a no go. The weight of a freezer big enough to put full quarters is too much. We are looking at a cooler system. An air conditioner unit is about 50 pounds, so is the generator. If we source local lumber and insulate that structure with something we might be able to pull it off and be under our 150# weight limit. Bringing in lumber is too much weight. Thinking of using a concrete blanket to wrap a 3x6x8 structure made from local small spruce poles. The CoolBot would keep the air conditioner from freezing up, but is expensive.

    Leave a comment:


  • kaybur
    replied
    This is a very good question. It seems to me that the hunting region itself needs to be clarified here. Perhaps this is real and feasible.

    Leave a comment:

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