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  • Spring Black Bear Questions Anchorage Area

    This is the first year that I've decided to try my hand at hunting black bears. I'm in Anchorage so I've been taking a number of day trips into the management areas near here. I haven't found any bears yet, or even any sign of them... no scat, no prints (there's a lot of mud from snow melt that would show whether a bear has passed by). I've seen a lot more sign of them in town, and at my house than I have deeper in the management areas. Having read through other forums on this site already my strategy has been to find what they are eating. Yesterday was the first that I have found any chutes of green starting to pop up in the valley bottom, and the mountainsides still appear the be very brown. Starting to think that ALL the bears have made their way into Anchorage neighborhoods where garbage foraging opportunities abound (jk).

    Anyway, my questions for those still reading are:

    1. Is it still a little too early in those areas, and am I better off waiting a little longer for green up, or is now a good time and I'm just not looking in the right places?

    2. What food sources should I be concentrating on looking for when there is still very little if anything green around?

    3. It's very dense with trees, alders, devil's club, etc in the valley bottom without much line of site to be had. From the valley I'm able to get glimpses of the mountainsides which are checkered with patches of mostly alder, spruce and still brown meadows (and snow). Would a better strategy be to find a place that looks promising in the dense valley bottom and set up a spot down wind for an ambush, or to do some serious bushwhacking to try and get up past the alders where there is lot more visibility to attempt a spot and stalk?

    4. What are the GPS coordinates for the best spots in the Chugach?

    Thanks for any help that you guys are willing to provide. This forum has already been a wealth of great information!

    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk


  • #2
    Originally posted by mockjt View Post
    This is the first year that I've decided to try my hand at hunting black bears. I'm in Anchorage so I've been taking a number of day trips into the management areas near here. I haven't found any bears yet, or even any sign of them... no scat, no prints (there's a lot of mud from snow melt that would show whether a bear has passed by). I've seen a lot more sign of them in town, and at my house than I have deeper in the management areas. Having read through other forums on this site already my strategy has been to find what they are eating. Yesterday was the first that I have found any chutes of green starting to pop up in the valley bottom, and the mountainsides still appear the be very brown. Starting to think that ALL the bears have made their way into Anchorage neighborhoods where garbage foraging opportunities abound (jk).

    Anyway, my questions for those still reading are:

    1. Is it still a little too early in those areas, and am I better off waiting a little longer for green up, or is now a good time and I'm just not looking in the right places?

    2. What food sources should I be concentrating on looking for when there is still very little if anything green around?

    3. It's very dense with trees, alders, devil's club, etc in the valley bottom without much line of site to be had. From the valley I'm able to get glimpses of the mountainsides which are checkered with patches of mostly alder, spruce and still brown meadows (and snow). Would a better strategy be to find a place that looks promising in the dense valley bottom and set up a spot down wind for an ambush, or to do some serious bushwhacking to try and get up past the alders where there is lot more visibility to attempt a spot and stalk?

    4. What are the GPS coordinates for the best spots in the Chugach?

    Thanks for any help that you guys are willing to provide. This forum has already been a wealth of great information!

    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk
    First of all, there is a reason why you see tons of bears right in downtown anchorage but not in the places where you can actually shoot bears. Bears are smart and they know where they are safe. Simple as that. It's complete insanity that the municipality of Anchorage doesn't allow people to hunt bears close to town. If they did they would eliminate most if not all of the bear/human encounters and human fatalities. That being said I'll try to answer your questions.

    1. Nope, not too early, just in time. Bears are coming out right now.

    2. Fresh vegetation at higher elevations and pregnant moose dropping calves. A newborn calf is a bait pile. If you are lucky enough to find one in suitable habitat, pick a seat and wait. A bear will more than likely find the calf. (60% mortality rate)

    3. Spot and stalk is always the best prospect. If in thick cover, your best bet is set up a bait pile, but you need a baiting permit to do so.

    4. Ha, very funny and good try. This is a bad place to ask for GPS coordinates buddy. If you want to ask for tips, strategies, techniques and general locations only (like GMUs, roads, etc.) you might get lucky. But you probably have a better chance of somebody giving away free money on this site than someone willing to give away GPS coordinates to their favorite hunting and fishing spots

    Comment


    • #3


      Originally posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post

      First of all, there is a reason why you see tons of bears right in downtown anchorage but not in the places where you can actually shoot bears. Bears are smart and they know where they are safe. Simple as that. It's complete insanity that the municipality of Anchorage doesn't allow people to hunt bears close to town. If they did they would eliminate most if not all of the bear/human encounters and human fatalities. That being said I'll try to answer your questions.

      1. Nope, not too early, just in time. Bears are coming out right now.

      2. Fresh vegetation at higher elevations and pregnant moose dropping calves. A newborn calf is a bait pile. If you are lucky enough to find one in suitable habitat, pick a seat and wait. A bear will more than likely find the calf. (60% mortality rate)

      3. Spot and stalk is always the best prospect. If in thick cover, your best bet is set up a bait pile, but you need a baiting permit to do so.

      4. Ha, very funny and good try. This is a bad place to ask for GPS coordinates buddy. If you want to ask for tips, strategies, techniques and general locations only (like GMUs, roads, etc.) you might get lucky. But you probably have a better chance of somebody giving away free money on this site than someone willing to give away GPS coordinates to their favorite hunting and fishing spots
      Thanks for the help! Completely agree with your first point. I would love to see the municipality allow for hunting closer to town. Bears and moose both are overpopulated and can be a problem here.

      I'll be fighting with the alders to get into some higher elevations on my next trip out. Any particular habitat to keep an eye out for when looking for suitable calving areas?

      As for the GPS coordinates, that was an attempt at humor.... The search for a good spot is half the fun. Wouldn't be "hunting" without it.

      Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mockjt View Post
        As for the GPS coordinates, that was an attempt at humor....
        Even though you are new here, I still didn't want to believe you were actually being serious

        Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

        Comment


        • #5
          They are out. Plenty of green for them to eat. My experience is if you are baiting that activity on the bait site will drop the same time the moose calves do. There are new items on the menu. Watching hillsides is one of my favorite ways to spot black bears. Good binoculars are a must.
          Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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          • #6
            Check south facing slopes.
            Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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            • #7
              Put on hiking boots and get up high and glass. I'm heading out again today, only seen 1 bear last weekend but that was a quick scouting overnighter trip.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by mockjt View Post

                Any particular habitat to keep an eye out for when looking for suitable calving areas?
                No not really. Other than just areas that are good for moose in general. Willows, rivers, areas that have been disturbed such as places with past fires etc. But as you probably know, moose can be just about anywhere. On another note, if you ever happen to see a cow moose and her newborn calves quickly take to the water to cross, like a lake or large pond, just wait a few minutes. I can almost guarantee you that a bear is close behind her. I've seen this happen a few times. And every time that I've seen it happen, a bear was right behind her within 10 minutes of her crossing. I believe (based on observation, not by research) that the mothers instinctively know to do this because it's a way to make the bears lose the trail of their scent. Just my two cents. And I'm glad you were joking about the GPS coordinates. Wasn't sure if you were or not, but I didn't think anybody was gonna share anything with you anyway.

                Comment

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